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Fb2 The Interpreter ePub

by Alice Kaplan

Category: Americas
Subcategory: History books
Author: Alice Kaplan
ISBN: 0743254244
ISBN13: 978-0743254243
Language: English
Publisher: Free Press (August 30, 2005)
Pages: 256
Fb2 eBook: 1897 kb
ePub eBook: 1916 kb
Digital formats: txt doc lrf lrf

Alice Kaplan is the author of French Lessons: A Memoir, The Collaborator, The Interpreter, and Dreaming in. .

Alice Kaplan is the author of French Lessons: A Memoir, The Collaborator, The Interpreter, and Dreaming in French: The Paris Years of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davis, and the translator of OK, Joe, The Difficulty of Being a Dog, A Box of Photographs, and Palace of Books. Her books have been twice finalists for the National Book Critics Circle Awards, once for the National Book Award, and she is a winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. She holds the John M. Musser chair in French literature at Yale. She lives in Guilford, Connecticut.

Alice Kaplan's The Interpreter finally reveals the horrific hidden history of.Thank you for signing up, fellow book lover! Tell us what you like and we'll recommend books you'll love.

Alice Kaplan's The Interpreter finally reveals the horrific hidden history of America's blatant World War II military injustice against its own black soldiers. Thank you, Alice Kaplan. Alice Kaplan exposes the brutal double standard of justice of America's 'Jim Crow' Army.

The Interpreter book. Book by Kaplan, Alice. But the book retreats immediately into pedantic legal arguments. Point taken, Mme Kaplan. But it's certainly not as open and shut as the cover proposes. Oct 11, 2019 Michael Romo rated it really liked it. I think the title of this book says it all. An important book.

As Kaplan demonstrates, that virtue was illusory: In one case that she closely documents, a white American officer murdered an.Kaplan illuminates some abhorrent recent history that the Army would likely prefer to forget.

Kaplan illuminates some abhorrent recent history that the Army would likely prefer to forget.

Kaplan has written a unique book that combines history, literary biography, investigative journalism, courtroom drama, and personal memoir. The miracle is that she blends these genres so effortlessly in a book as compelling and beautifully written as French Lessons and The Collaborator.

Historian Alice Kaplan's new book The Interpreter describes the disproportionately large number of black World War II soldiers publicly executed . That's Alice Kaplan reading from her new book "The Interpreter

Historian Alice Kaplan's new book The Interpreter describes the disproportionately large number of black World War II soldiers publicly executed by the . That's Alice Kaplan reading from her new book "The Interpreter. The author drew upon the observations from a French US Army interpreter to describe how Jim Crow era military courts sentenced a disproportionate number of black soldiers to be hanged in public, sometimes as Europeans and white American soldiers looked on. Ms. KAPLAN: The citizens of Plumaudan were to be informed, but official attendance should be limited to authorities designated by the American Army.

Alice Kaplan is the Lehrman Professor of Romance Studies and professor of literature and history at Duke University. She is the author of French Lessons and The Collaborator and the translator of OK, Joe, all published by the University of Chicago Press. Her books have been nominated twice for the National Book Critics Circle Award and once for the National Book Award, and she is a winner of the Los Angeles Times Book Prize. Country of Publication.

Published by Free Press, 2005. Condition: Good Hardcover. Excellent customer service. 30 day return policy. Books Express LLC 318 US Route 1, STE 2 Kittery ME 03904. From Books Express (Portsmouth, NH, . Price: US$ 8. 8 Convert Currency. Shipping: Free Within . Destination, rates & speeds.

Draws on the account of World War II French political novelist and court interpreter Louis Guilloux, who witnessed general Patton's example-setting executions of seventy American troops, many of whom the interpreter believed were condemned because of their race. By the author of The Collaborator. 35,000 first printing.
Comments to eBook The Interpreter
Timberahue
I was very disappointed in this book which concerns an area of military history in which I am keenly interested. It was like listening to a Monday morning quarterback describing a long ago game. The author selected two very different cases to illustrate her supposition that we had a Jim Crow Army during WWII. She fails to note that in a 1945 Report of the Judge Advocates Section, HQ FET (Rear) which states out of 411 persons sentenced to death, 239 were white. Of these the numbers convicted of rape and murder weere 142 Black and 86 White. Many of these sentences were commuted and the author correctly states that only 70 persons were actually executed. Most of the white prisoners under death sentence were convicted of military type charges such as desertion, misconduct in front of the enemy, etc. Such statements as "James Hendricks was a fully trained servant of liberation in a white man's Army," (pg 33) sounds like a statement designed to inflame the reader. The author allows little space to the Military Police investigation and involvement of the Criminal Investigation Division (CID). As for the trial, Ms. Kaplan is critical of everything from the site selection to the board and attorneys handling of the trial. Late in 1945, in just one military disciplinary training center, in France, there were 82 men under sentence of death. They were a mix of white, black, latins, enlisted and officer. None of them were executed as far as I have been able to learn. Did we have racial problems in the Army under segregation? Yes, of course we did and it lasted long after integration. However, the author paints the entire military establishment with the broad brush of prejudice which is untrue.
Zulurr
This is a fascinating and extremely compelling story about a lesser-known aspect of WWII. The way American black soldiers were treated by their own army is something we should all familiarize ourselves with.
I came to this book via the new John Wideman essay.
Ance
good stuff
Lahorns Gods
The author's apparent liberal bias justified my low rating of this book. If she had just stuck to the facts about her black soldier "hero" who was hanged for murder and attempted rape, perhaps she would have had either a best seller or a separate fictionalized TV movie deal.

In my opinion, the author erred in choosing a French interpreter during the trial of the black soldier for the book's title. It is not perfectly clear as to how proficient the interpreter actually was in translating French witnesses' testimony into contemporary American English, nor his importance to the court martial members as they heard all the facts of the trial and made their unanimous decision to hang the black soldier for murder and attempted rape of French civilians in 1944 during the American army's liberation of France. I cannot believe that the interpeter was present during the court's closed deliberations to determine guilt or innocence of the accused black soldier.

She attmpted to contrast the black man's conviction and subsequent hanging with an American officer who was found not guilty of killing a possible German spy armed with a weapon at about the same time in 1944. This is the fatal flaw in this story.

I will give the author credit for explaining the many safeguards for the accused in a court martial trial. While the needs of the armed forces in wartime are to find guilt or innocence quickly, there are enough safeguards that give the accused hope for outright acquital, or reduction in sentence by a mandatory review by higher headquarters.
Ddilonyne
Kaplan made a number of mistakes in her book. Another reviewer has pointed out factual mistakes relating to military medals and history. George Whittington was my father, so I can point out some other factual errors the author made. She suggests that Whittington killed the man outside the bar because the man was, at some point, speaking Spanish, and that Whittington didn't understand what the man had said. Fact: Because he grew up in New Mexico from the age of 10, my father spoke Spanish fluently and without an American accent. He was so fluent in the language that when he travelled in Spanish-speaking countries, people there did not know he was from the States. Fact: my father was a true war hero, highly decorated, and greatly respected by the men he led into battle. He was written about by name in various histories of World War II. One of his heroic actions on D Day was portrayed in the film The Longest Day (by Tommy Sands). He is in the New Mexico Military Institute hall of fame. Among the facts Kaplan presents in her book are the following: A black private had been in France for a couple of weeks, and had seen no combat, when he chose to get drunk and go on a rampage in the French countryside, killing and raping innocent French civilians. He was executed for his crimes. Shortly after D Day, my father killed a man outside a bar where the victim, my father, and other soldiers were drinking. The victim was wearing bits and pieces of various uniforms, refused to identify himself as to his nationality, spoke various languages with an accent that may have been German, and while inside the bar, pointed his rifle in a threatening manner at an American soldier. No identification was found on his body. My father was not executed for his crime. And this, according to the author, is a brilliant example of racism in the American military during WW II. In her book, the author excuses the black private for his actions (he was from a small town and far from home, he may not have been entirely stable prior to his joining the military). She makes no mention of what effect lengthy combat experience might have on a man's psyche. Buried in the notes at the back of the book is something about the dead man's identity that suggested he may, in fact, have been a spy. On a personal note: Kaplan describes my father as being short. If he had been short, the other soldiers shown with him in a photograph in the book would have been too small to get on a carnival ride. He was 5'10 1/2" tall. She portrays my father as a sort of primitive, knuckle-dragger. He spoke 5 languages, learned German after the war (and because of it), and a month before his death was brushing up on his Latin verbs. He did not talk about the war. I know of three stories, and only three. He himself was an eloquent writer. One piece he wrote for a local paper (it ran on Veteran's Day, I believe) described one experience he had: he was standing in a doorway in France talking with some 2 or 3 other soldiers. The next thing he knew he was waking up in a bombed-out basement, and the men he had been speaking with were dead around him, steam rising from their brains. My father received 3 Purple Hearts. He was not a fan of war, but he was an outstanding warrior. When Kaplan's book was published, she sent my mother a copy. I read it and sent her a civil, though scathing, letter, which she did not acknowledge. Racism is ugly in any context. Racism in WW II deserved better treatment than it got in Kaplan book. So did my father.
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