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Fb2 Unafraid of the Dark: A Memoir ePub

by Rosemary Bray

Category: Americas
Subcategory: History books
Author: Rosemary Bray
ISBN: 0679425551
ISBN13: 978-0679425557
Language: English
Publisher: Random House; 1st edition (February 10, 1998)
Pages: 282
Fb2 eBook: 1602 kb
ePub eBook: 1383 kb
Digital formats: doc mbr mobi txt

Unafraid of the Dark book.

Unafraid of the Dark book. In her deeply affecting, vividly written memoir, Rosemary L. Bray describes with remarkable frankness growing up poor in Chicago in the 1960s, and her childhood shaped by welfare, the Roman Catholic Church, and the civil rights movement.

McNatt, Rosemary Bray. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

In elegant, passionate prose, Rosemary L. Bray uses her personal history to persuasively defend America's . Unafraid of the Dark is a beautifully written, inspirational and deeply touching book. I was unable to put it down from the moment I read the first page.

Unafraid of the Dark is a beautifully written, inspirational and deeply touching book. I admire Rosemary and feel that she is an inspiration to all African American women. Essential reading! By Thriftbooks. com User, January 14, 1999. Rosemary Bray's memoir cuts through the anti-welfare hype and contempt for poor people, especially poor black women, that brought us "welfare reform.

Bray is an eloquent and perhaps surprising voice for the generation of welfare recipients that has come of age since the '60s

Bray is an eloquent and perhaps surprising voice for the generation of welfare recipients that has come of age since the '60s. As her affecting story reflects, her accomplishment is an achievement not so much of material progress but of the intellect-a contribution to cultural understanding. An African-American woman, a child of the '60s, recalls growing up poor on Chicago's South Side, attending Yale as an affirmative-action beneficiary, and taking her knocks en route to an understanding of the world and her role in it.

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With complete candor, she explains why she feels changes in the welfare system make it virtually impossible for her story to happen today. Bray writes poignantly of her lasting dread of the cold and the dark that characterized her years of poverty; of her mother's extraordinary strength and resourcefulness; and of the system that miraculously enabled her mother to scrape together enough to keep the children fed and clothed.

Details about Unafraid of the Dark: In her deeply affecting, vividly written memoir, Rosemary L.

UNAFRAID OF THE DARK: A MEMOIR is a story of a young American girl’s dreams coming true. Her dreams of marriage and of having a traditional family and home are also realized. Sources for Further Study.

Jim Adamson, Rosemary Bray McNatt, Robert McNatt. Rosemary Bray McNatt. The Allen Institute for Artificial IntelligenceProudly built by AI2 with the help of our. Collaborators.

In this stunning memoir, Rosemary Bray describes growing up poor in Chicago in the 1960s and becoming one of the first black women at Yale--and she shows why changes in the welfare system make it virtually impossible for her inspiring story to happen today."Certain things shape you, change you forever," Bray writes. "Years later, long after you think you've escaped, some ordinary experience flings you backward into memory. Being poor is like that. Living surrounded by fear and rage is like that. I grew up hating the cold, dreading the approach of night. Thirty years later, a too-cold room at night can trigger a flash of terror."When Rosemary Bray's mother decides to apply for welfare, it creates a rift between her parents, and yet it proves to be the salvation of the family, enabling the Bray children to be educated--and education was the one thing her parents agreed upon as the only way to a better life. Bray writes movingly about her resourceful mother, who joins the Catholic church and shepherds the children to school. The nuns at the Catholic school spot Rosemary's potential and arrange for her to become one of the few black children at Parker, a predominantly white private school on the other side of Chicago. In a series of powerful vignettes, Bray describes the shock of discovering the discrepancies between her life and the lives of her affluent classmates. She writes of the experiences that gave her hope: a teacher fostering her development and choosing her to play the title role in Alice in Wonderland; the thrill of being accepted at Yale; falling in love; becoming a journalist; and, ultimately, becoming a mother.In this beautiful memoir about how the dark in a life can be overcome, race, gender, and social problems are explored as a fine writer tells the story of a life.
Comments to eBook Unafraid of the Dark: A Memoir
Gribandis
The clearly told story of Rosemary's growing up black and poor in the South Side of Chicago in the 1960s, and how she is able to transcend this with a good education. European Americans can get a real picture of what experiences and thoughts she goes through in going to school with white children, and later at Yale; this gives a kind of vicarious cultural immersion. For this alone the book is a valuable contribution. But it is so much more. Very much worth reading
Ceroelyu
Rosemary Bray's memoir cuts through the anti-welfare hype and contempt for poor people, especially poor black women, that brought us "welfare reform." Her mother went on AFDC because her father was a violent gambler, and she had four kids to raise. Welfare enabled rosemary to grow up in threadbare but at least decent poverty--food on table, roof over head,school supplies and so forth. Far from promulgating the "culture of dependency," welfare helped Bray's mother get some independence. And far from passing welfare on to her daughter, Rosemary went to yale. Bray writes so perceptively about her family and her childhood, about the racism of l960s Chicago (and of yale). she made me think about all the little cruelties and deprivations poor people are expected to just accept, and how wrong this is. I wish every white person would read this book, and every person who thinks people are poor because they "don't want to work." Isn't it interesting that even in the midst of the "memoir boom," this book didn't get front page reviews?
Gold as Heart
I checked this book out at my local library, after seeing it displayed on a black history month shelf. I'm a avid reader and this book left me feeling disappointed not was I was excepting, at all! I finished thinking "what was the writers purpose". This isnt your typical welfare child who grows up and attend an ivy league college, she is a welfare child who attended catholic and private schools her entire life and then off to Yale, a big difference in my opinion. The welfare situation really was a unspoken detail which really was not addressed in the book 'cept for a few pages and the last chapter. To me this book was more about her abusive then her mother having to rely on public assistance. The repeated theme out the book was about the abuse she & her mother endure from the hands of her father and the moms husband and also not much detail was spoken of her siblings also residing in the home. I dont know, this story left me more with questions then answers....
Golden freddi
Very good insight into how whites (I am a white male - I needed to read this book) unknowingly perpetuate racism. There are several anecdotes in the book that, in my humble opinion, precisely capture the essence of racism in America. There's one in particular, a scene in a cafeteria at Yale. The book in general paints a great explanation of how, in order to look after ourselves, we need to stop letting children, black or white, fall through the holes.
Zodama
This woman knows how to write and she has something to say. She makes her point very effectively. For the cost of a paperback, you can give a copy to every Republican or other person who matters to you who doesn't understand or support Aid to Dependent Children or welfare, etc. Her book leads people to care about her and understand.
Samugul
This book was one that opened my eyes to the welfare program and the problems it has. It has also illustrated the social gaps that have been created by gender, race, and poverty. Rosemary did an excellent job in description in the life that she lead, and to how she has overcome the many barriers in her life. A great read for all!
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