» » Being Comanche: The Social History of an American Indian Community

Fb2 Being Comanche: The Social History of an American Indian Community ePub

by Morris W. Foster

Category: Americas
Subcategory: History books
Author: Morris W. Foster
ISBN: 0816513678
ISBN13: 978-0816513673
Language: English
Publisher: University of Arizona Press (December 1, 1992)
Pages: 230
Fb2 eBook: 1958 kb
ePub eBook: 1231 kb
Digital formats: doc rtf docx mbr

Morris Foster has written the first study of Comanches' history that identifies continuities in their intracommunity . As was true of many tribes, Comanche social organization was invoked through the informal establishment of a "moral community" based on "presentation of face.

Morris Foster has written the first study of Comanches' history that identifies continuities in their intracommunity organization from the initial period of European contact to the present da. Social units and social situations were used to organize relations among tribe members based solely on the presentation of face. And as a result, the community remained a viable constantly changing, vital interactive sociocultural entity.

Morris W. Foster has written the first study of Comanches' history that identifies continuities in their intracommunity organization from the initial period of European contact to the present day.

by Morris Foster--Same ISBN-Very good used condition-1991 University of Arizona Press Hardcover with dust jacket-clean text-good binding-interesting and informative-ship ASAP. Other Products from alexshanbooks (View All). Griff Carver Hallway Patrol audio book cds Jim Kreig.

a social history of an American Indian community.

1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Being Comanche from your list? Being Comanche. a social history of an American Indian community. Published 1991 by University of Arizona Press in Tucson.

The Social History of an American Indian Community. The University of Arizona Press publishes the work of leading scholars from around the globe. Learn more about submitting a proposal, preparing your final manuscript, and publication.

A member of a prominent Dakota family, he received his PhD from Yale University in 1994

481 Foster, Morris W. 1991: Being Comanche: A Social History of an American Indian Community (Tucson: University of Arizona Press). Fowler, Loretta 1982: Arapahoe Politics, 1851-1978 (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press). Стр. 486 Mandell, Daniel R. 1996: Behind the Frontier: Indians in Eighteenth-Century Eastern Massachusetts (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press). A member of a prominent Dakota family, he received his PhD from Yale University in 1994. In addition to numerous articles and essays, he is the author of Playing Indian (1998). Neal Salisbury is Professor of History at Smith College. Foster Background Born January 28, l960 in Alva . Tucson: University of Arizona Press. Foster Background Born January 28, l960 in Alva, Oklahoma Attended public schools in Alva and Stillwater, Oklahoma Education l981 P. Yale University . hil. with Distinction, University of Oklahoma Honors and Scholarships - 1978-1979 Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin Prize for Best Book in Ethnohistory, American Society for Ethnohistory Graduate. Book Chapters and Journal Articles Submitted Foster MW, Sharp RR.

Being Comanche : A Social History of an American Indian Community. I would recommend this book for those who are interested and would like know more about Indian tribes - especially Comanche. This book is divided into different time periods, for instance in 18th Century, the Comanches were nomadic people and after that, they stayed in reservations, etc. The author also explained the relationship between Comanches and the Euro-Americans and how the federal government implement various policies. It's also interesting to see over time, what Comanches cultures persisted and what changes they are.

He is the author of Being Comanche: The Social History of an American Indian Community (1991).

Being Comanche: A social history of an American Indian community. University of Arizona Press, 1992. Environmental Health Perspectives 110 (suppl 2), 145-148, 2002. Beyond race: towards a whole-genome perspective on human populations and genetic variation.

Winner, Erminie Wheeler-Voegelin Book Award (American Society for Ethnohistory) Comanches have engaged Euro-Americans' curiosity for three centuries. Their relations with Spanish, French, and Anglo-Americans on the southern Plains have become a highly resonant part of the mythology of the American West. Yet we know relatively little about the community that Comanches have shared and continue to construct in southwestern Oklahoma. Morris W. Foster has written the first study of Comanches' history that identifies continuities in their intracommunity organization from the initial period of European contact to the present day. Those continuities are based on shared participation in public social occasions such as powwows, peyote gatherings, and church meetings Foster explains how these occasions are used to regulate social organization and how they have been modified by Comanches to adapt them to changing political and economic relations with Euro-Americans. Using a model of community derived from sociolinguistics, Foster argues that Comanches have remained a distinctive people by organizing their face-to-face relations with one another in ways that maintain Comanche-Comanche lines of communication and regulate a shared sense of appropriate behavior. His book offers readers a significant reinterpretation of traditional anthropological and historical views of Comanche social organization.
Comments to eBook Being Comanche: The Social History of an American Indian Community
Shan
I have just begun reading this book, I ordered 5 various books on Comanches.
So far it has a lot of documented information, which is good.
My Great Grandmother was full blooded Comanche and I was very happy to have found these books on Comanches. Interesting reading and history... True history as I mentioned this book has documented information.....
Anaragelv
Like Archaeologists are about uncovering ancient artifacts, Anthropologists are the same about uncovering the origins of human behavior. Both are proficient and precise in their respective descriptions of the elements they capture. And while one uses the digs from deep layers of the earth's crust of ancient sites of past life, the other uses sociocultural theories that probe deeply into cultural behavior of select groups. In doing so here, what this author discovered is that Comanches are Comanches because they are able to relate to each other by "risking moral face" with members both inside and outside of their tribes. Wholly with theoretical tools the Anthropologist is able to uncover and understand in the most exacting and precise ways the secrets of past human behavior. That is to say, he is able to understand and describe the ways the various layers of human behavior that underlie particular cultures do their job of holding communities together. In this case the behavior in question is that underlying the behavior of Comanche tribal culture.

Indian interactions occur mostly through community actions, and are mostly informal and un-institutionalized, actions such as pow-wows, informal feasts, native dances, competitive games and hunts, as well as spiritual séances. As was true of many tribes, Comanche social organization was invoked through the informal establishment of a "moral community" based on "presentation of face." Social units and social situations were used to organize relations among tribe members based solely on the presentation of face. And as a result, the community remained a viable constantly changing, vital interactive sociocultural entity.

In short, what this author has discovered here is that at its very root, the essence of Comanche tribal culture, the repertoire of behaviorial interactions that provided the glue that held the cultural community together, was the construction of a "moral community" based on an "understood moral code" expressed through "presentations of face."

Without the need for elaborate institutions, somehow Comanches discovered that a morally based community was the best basis for binding a group into a duty-bound tribe, one that could be established simply by the act of risking the moral lost of face among its members. With this incredible, but irreducible component of human behavior, tribal cultures became not just a viable, self-sustaining moral force, but also a vital, culture sufficient to bind its members together into a duty-bound community. Embodied in their unwritten tribal gestures was everything that modern cultures seek to capture and express in words, constitutions, religious creeds and sacred texts.

This author attempts to give us the details of how one tribe went about this societal construction project via what he calls social history. To do so, he used six types of information. First he used close personal Interviews between Comanches and the author, or between them and other interviewers that had close personal relationships with Comanche tribe members. Second, he attended Comanche gatherings where he was allowed to be an innocent by-stander to some of their most important ceremonies. Third, he made use of existing oral history and the interviews of Comanches who lived during the times described. Among these are included "The Indian-Pioneer Papers" that were part of the WPA Project of the 1930s, as well as the Doris Duke Collection compiled in the 1960s. Fourth, the author used ethnographic studies of Comanche life and rituals, including "the ghost dance" and peyote use during spiritual ceremonies. Fifth, the author made extensive use of existing archival materials. These included the raw files of the Kiowa Agency, which administered Comanche-White relations since 1869; also the microfilms of the Western Historical Collection at the University of Oklahoma; as well as the collection at the Museum of the Great Plains in Lawton, Oklahoma. Finally, the author also used historical studies,

Without trying to romanticize Native American cultures and humanity beyond what they deserve, it is fair to say that embodied in the inscrutable facial gestures that every Comanche recognizes and understands, is the understood wisdom of literally centuries of Comanche culture. Since "presentation of face" is a different paradigm for the construction of human behavior than we are used to, it is difficult for an outsider to describe and to understand. However I think that Erving Goffman in the epigram on page 166 came about as close to doing so as anyone is likely to get. There what he said aptly summarizes the consequences of the Comanche culture of "moral face:"

If societies are to mobilize their members as self-regulating participants in social encounters, then one way of doing this is through rituals. Through the ritual of "presentation of face," tribal members are taught to be perceptive, to have feelings attached to self and self-respect as it is expressed through face, to have pride, honor, dignity, to have considerateness, to have tact, and a certain amount of poise.

These are some of the elements that must be built into a tribal member's character (no matter the tribe) if practical use is to be made of him as a fully interacting duty-bound member of a tribe, a community or a society. And it is these elements that are referred to when one speaks of universal human nature. A rich and thought-provoking read. Five Stars.
Faulkree
I would recommend this book for those who are interested and would like know more about Indian tribes - especially Comanche. This book is divided into different time periods, for instance in 18th Century, the Comanches were nomadic people and after that, they stayed in reservations, etc. The author also explained the relationship between Comanches and the Euro-Americans and how the federal government implement various policies.
It's also interesting to see over time, what Comanches cultures persisted and what changes they are. One notable change was their economic activity which changed due to the economic and political situations. But one element that persisted over time was their kinship and friendship among themselves and how they can always rely on that even though everything else change.
This book explained the stereotypes that Euro-Americans have over the Native Americans and also what the Comanches thought of the Anglos (Euro-Americans)
The Sinners from Mitar
As a Comanche living away from Comancheria, I've put a lot of thought into what makes a NUMUNU be. This book has helped by offering the sociological perspective. Sadly, it means my kids though blood related are not Comanche.
Related to Being Comanche: The Social History of an American Indian Community
Moon Medicine eBook
Fb2 Moon Medicine ePub
The European Community after twenty years (The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science ; v. 440) eBook
Fb2 The European Community after twenty years (The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science ; v. 440) ePub
Locating Filipino Americans (Asian American History Cultu) eBook
Fb2 Locating Filipino Americans (Asian American History  Cultu) ePub
Fort Supply, Indian Territory: Frontier Outpost on the Plains eBook
Fb2 Fort Supply, Indian Territory: Frontier Outpost on the Plains ePub
Social Democratic Parties in the European Union: History, Organization, Policies eBook
Fb2 Social Democratic Parties in the European Union: History, Organization, Policies ePub
The Comanche Code Talkers of World War II eBook
Fb2 The Comanche Code Talkers of World War II ePub
A History of the Indians of the United States (The Civilization of the American Indian Series) eBook
Fb2 A History of the Indians of the United States (The Civilization of the American Indian Series) ePub
Mobilizing an Asian American Community (Asian American History Culture) eBook
Fb2 Mobilizing an Asian American Community (Asian American History  Culture) ePub
The Struggle in Black and Brown: African American and Mexican American Relations during the Civil Rights Era (Justice and Social Inquiry) eBook
Fb2 The Struggle in Black and Brown: African American and Mexican American Relations during the Civil Rights Era (Justice and Social Inquiry) ePub