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Fb2 Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans ePub

by Jean Pfaelzer

Category: Americas
Subcategory: History books
Author: Jean Pfaelzer
ISBN: 1400061342
ISBN13: 978-1400061341
Language: English
Publisher: Random House; 1 edition (May 29, 2007)
Pages: 432
Fb2 eBook: 1458 kb
ePub eBook: 1920 kb
Digital formats: txt docx doc mobi

Driven Out: The Forgotten. has been added to your Cart. Retaliation against Western missionaries was in direct response to the "bulldozing" of Chinese in America, and no doubt more than a few Boxers had experienced the wrong end of a fist themselves in a California mining camp.

Driven Out: The Forgotten. Such was beyond the comprehension of the five-power coalition of the willing that invaded China to teach it a lesson about human rights.

Now, Jean Pfaelzer steps forward as a fresh reinforcement in this morale-draining campaign. Altogether, Chinese immigrants filed more than 7,000 lawsuits in the decade after the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, and they won the vast majority of them, Pfaelzer writes. In Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans, she tells the story of the thousands of Chinese people who were violently herded onto railroad cars, steamers or logging rafts, marched out of town or killed, from the Pacific coast to the Rocky Mountains. Despite the forceful adjective of Pfaelzer’s subtitle, this burdensome history has not been entirely forgotten.

Driven Out unearths this forgotten episode in our nation’s past

Driven Out unearths this forgotten episode in our nation’s past.

Driven Out unearths this forgotten episode in our nation’s past. The brutal and systematic ethnic cleansing of Chinese Americans in California and the Pacific Northwest in the second half of the nineteenth century is a shocking–and virtually unexplored–chapter of American history. Driven Out unearths this forgotten episode in our nation’s past. In Driven Out, Jean Pfaelzer sheds a harsh light on America’s past. This is a story of hitherto unknown racial pogroms, purges, roundups, and brutal terror, but also a record of valiant resistance and community. This deeply resonant and eye-opening work documents a significant and disturbing episode in American history.

Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans. Driven Out unearths this forgotten episode in our nation’s past

Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans. A new york times notable book.

Driven Out. Subtitle. The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans. The low number of Chinese women probably made the Chinese communities in America particularly vulnerable to persecution

Driven Out. Your purchase helps support NPR programming. The low number of Chinese women probably made the Chinese communities in America particularly vulnerable to persecution. Chinese women would have foretold family, civilization, and permanence, and their very presence would have stood as a barrier to the idea that the Chinese had come to the United States as sojourners -temporary and enduringly foreign.

After the reopening of US-China relations in the 1970s, the two groups joined hands in promoting China-US scientific and educational exchanges, leading eventually to the coming to the US of a new generation .

After the reopening of US-China relations in the 1970s, the two groups joined hands in promoting China-US scientific and educational exchanges, leading eventually to the coming to the US of a new generation of Chinese physics students and the return to China of some of the original "stayees. Driven Out: The Forgotten War against Chinese Americans. New York: Random House.

Driven Out exposes a shocking story of ethnic cleansing in California and the Pacific Northwest when the first Chinese . com User, May 31, 2007

Driven Out exposes a shocking story of ethnic cleansing in California and the Pacific Northwest when the first Chinese Americans were rounded up and purged from. com User, May 31, 2007. Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans" is the first book I have ever read to address this particular issue, the "brutal and systematic" treatment accorded the Chinese immigrants to America during the latter half of the nineteenth century and the early part of the twentieth.

By Jean Pfaelzer University of California Press, 2007

By Jean Pfaelzer University of California Press, 2007. 432 pp. ISBN-13: 978-0520256941. The book is organized in a manner so that each chapter is devoted to a specific theme related to the driving out. The first two chapters respectively describe the purging of Chinese labor that happened first in the mine fields during the Gold Rush era and thereafter in the farms and ranches. Chapter 3 introduces the depressing situation of the few Chinese women living in nineteenth-century California.

A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOKThe brutal and systematic “ethnic cleansing” of Chinese Americans in California and the Pacific Northwest in the second half of the nineteenth century is a shocking–and virtually unexplored–chapter of American history. Driven Out unearths this forgotten episode in our nation’s past. Drawing on years of groundbreaking research, Jean Pfaelzer reveals how, beginning in 1848, lawless citizens and duplicitous politicians purged dozens of communities of thousands of Chinese residents–and how the victims bravely fought back. In town after town, as races and classes were pitted against one another in the raw and anarchistic West, Chinese miners and merchants, lumberjacks and field workers, prostitutes and merchants’ wives, were gathered up at gunpoint and marched out of town, sometimes thrown into railroad cars along the very tracks they had built.Here, in vivid detail, are unforgettable incidents such as the torching of the Chinatown in Antioch, California, after Chinese prostitutes were accused of giving seven young men syphilis, and a series of lynchings in Los Angeles bizarrely provoked by a Chinese wedding. From the port of Seattle to the mining towns in California’s Siskiyou Mountains to “Nigger Alley” in Los Angeles, the first Chinese Americans were hanged, purged, and banished. Chinatowns across the West were burned to the ground. But the Chinese fought back: They filed the first lawsuits for reparations in the United States, sued for the restoration of their property, prosecuted white vigilantes, demanded the right to own land, and, years before Brown v. Board of Education, won access to public education for their children. Chinese Americans organized strikes and vegetable boycotts in order to starve out towns that tried to expel them. They ordered arms from China and, with Winchester rifles and Colt revolvers, defended themselves. In 1893, more than 100,000 Chinese Americans refused the government’s order to wear photo identity cards to prove their legal status–the largest mass civil disobedience in United States history to that point. Driven Out features riveting characters, both heroic and villainous, white and Asian. Charles McGlashen, a newspaper editor, spearheaded a shift in the tactics of persecution, from brutality to legal boycotts of the Chinese, in order to mount a run for governor of California. Fred Bee, a creator of the Pony Express, became the Chinese consul and one of the few attorneys willing to defend the Chinese. Lum May, a dry goods store owner, saw his wife dragged from their home and driven insane. President Grover Cleveland, hoping that China’s 400,000 subjects would buy the United States out of its economic crisis, persuaded China to abandon the overseas Chinese in return for a trade treaty. Quen Hing Tong, a merchant, sought an injunction against the city of San Jose in an important precursor to today’s suits against racial profiling and police brutality. In Driven Out, Jean Pfaelzer sheds a harsh light on America’s past. This is a story of hitherto unknown racial pogroms, purges, roundups, and brutal terror, but also a record of valiant resistance and community. This deeply resonant and eye-opening work documents a significant and disturbing episode in American history.“Jean Pfaelzer has pulled back the veil on one of the most horrendous, frightening, violent, and little known moments in American history, when the Chinese were driven from their homes and businesses in an effort to expel them from communities, states, and ultimately the country.  This is the most comprehensive history of this period I have ever read, and Pfaelzer has written it with sensitivity and a keen eye for the horrifying, heartbreaking, and often uplifting and triumphant details.  Driven Out couldn't be more timely or important.” –Lisa See, Author, Snow Flower and the Secret Fan “Driven Out: the Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans is a meticulously researched and very readable recounting of America’s systematic effort to purge all Chinese immigrants, from the mid-19th into the early-20th centuries. Jean Pfaelzer documents hundreds of cases in which the Chinese were lynched, maimed, burned out of their neighborhoods, and forced at gunpoint to leave mining camps, small villages, Indian reservations, and Chinatowns. The methodical and ruthless nature of this ethnic cleansing was matched only by the resistance from the Chinese — sometimes with guns and knives or fists and sometimes with savvy recourse to their government representatives as well as petitions, public confrontations, and hundreds of lawsuits using white attorneys up to the U.S. Supreme Court. Pfaelzer has names and stories for these incidents — making the actors real and accessible. This is a valuable addition to our understanding of the making of modern America.”–Franklin Odo, Director, Smithsonian Institution Asian Pacific American Program; Author, The Columbia Documentary History of the Asian American Experience “Thanks to this gripping narrative, Chinese immigrants to the Far West — so long overlooked — now stand front and center in the saga of the struggle for civil rights in these United States.”– Kevin Starr, University of Southern California; Author, California, A History"Too few Americans have any idea that these events mark the nation’s past. Pfaelzer capably reconstructs a shameful history.” – Kirkus Reviews
Comments to eBook Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans
Sat
Chinese expatriates have often been called the "Jews of Asia," and been treated accordingly in the Philippines, Indonesia, Vietnam, and elsewhere. Also too in the United States, which put American constitutional principles to the test and found them wanting in flesh and blood practice. That this major attempt at ethnic cleansing came on the heels of a civil war to "make men free" is doubly ironic; and perhaps why its history has been so determinedly funneled down the Orwellian memory hole.

What has also been benignly neglected is the role of organized labor in this legalized lynchery. Although slighted by labor and left historians, the anti-Chinese movement was the greatest organizing draw for fledgling unions and the Democratic Party throughout the West. There is much hypocrisy all around in this, too: In 400 grinding pages, Jean Pfaelzer shows an endless attack upon a vulnerable minority, instead of dealing with the powerful vested interests exploiting foreign labor and pitting it against the native-born. Much safer to burn Chinatowns than capitalist property, for that would be "anarchy." In a period when workers' strikes and riots were put down with ruthless fury - per the Chicago Haymarket - disgruntled employees were allowed by officials, police, and courts to take their full wrath upon a scapegoat of convenience: much like German conservatives used Hitler to bash the Jews instead of the Gentile rich. That Americans could embrace such demagoguery in the name of freedom shows us how self-interest triumphs over principles virtually every time.

One critique I'll make is the author's grammar. Repeated use of "the Chinese's" as a possessive clattered like a rock on a roof every time it crossed the page. "The role of the Chinese" just sounds right; "the Chinese's role" does not. Overall, though, her book remains the definitive examination of this purposely-suppressed history of the American West and the US in general. I say purposely, because nare a breath is drawn to it in popular Western literature and film, aside from the Cartwright family butler Hop Sing. (This was, btw, the name of a Chinese tong society: yet the violence of highbinder hatchet men, although alluded to, seemed never a direct cause of anti-Chinese rioting. Organized crime in Chinatown rarely touched whites.) The question remains as to why this history was swept under the bamboo mat.

It seems, ironically, due to the triumph of liberalism. Conforming to modern racial etiquette gives an out for perpetrators and apologists to hide their crimes; absolving their role to avoid negativity and divisiveness, allowing healing for later generations. There is a point here. But like suppressing the history of lynchings and race riots, it also allows popular culture to revel in American exceptionalism; and thereby launch crusades in full self-righteousness against other nations for crimes it has also perpetrated. A case in point was the Boxer Rebellion of 1900. Retaliation against Western missionaries was in direct response to the "bulldozing" of Chinese in America, and no doubt more than a few Boxers had experienced the wrong end of a fist themselves in a California mining camp. Such was beyond the comprehension of the five-power coalition of the willing that invaded China to teach it a lesson about human rights. This inspiring tradition continues.
Micelhorav
As a specialist in Sino-Western relations who writes both non-fiction books and historical fiction on this topic I bought this book already armed with a lot of knowledge of the topic.Nevertheless, I learned a great deal! The book is extraordinarily well researched and written. Indeed, for this reader/writer it was both time and money well spent. Beyond The Heavenly Kingdom: Sequel to Tienkuo: The Heavenly Kingdom (Sino-American Tales) (Volume 2)
lets go baby
Professor Jean Pfadelzer's seminal work, Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans, is indispensable for a critical and comprehensive understanding of the early years of the Chinese American Experience. Without this, we would have continued to operate on the basis of educated and intuitive hunches as to the origins, nature and outcomes of a little-known chapter in the history of racist oppression in this country. By the way, my copy of thus book came in the condition described, in a very timely fashion. Excellent service.
Altad
Not done yet, but the author does an excellent job of research and documents an ugly period
Gindian
Satisfied
Tygrafym
This is a terrific book, compellingly written and stuffed with thorough research and tons of facts It's about a decades-long era in our history where we tried to drive out Chinese immigrants and Chinese Americans from our country. The long-forgotten details are starting, covering pogroms in mining camps, California towns, the Denver riot of 1880 when a Chinese man was lunched, and how all of these were sanctioned by powerful men in business and politics.

Worth reading for anyone with an interest in Asian American history.

Got the Kindle edition too -- it's a great important re-read!
Prince Persie
It's a mortifying look at the tragic, self-interested racism of California's Caucasians of that era, and the outright complicity of the government officials. I found the story to be repetative at times. The blame for the enslavement & forced prostitution of many Chinese women seemed to fall wholly on the white population of California, with no outrage at the Chinese companies who carried out the enslavement and profited from it.
Great book!
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