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by Elizabeth De Michelis

Category: Exercise and Fitness
Subcategory: Health, Diets and Fitness
Author: Elizabeth De Michelis
ISBN: 0826487726
ISBN13: 978-0826487728
Language: English
Publisher: Continuum (December 8, 2005)
Pages: 302
Fb2 eBook: 1177 kb
ePub eBook: 1774 kb
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A History of Modern Yoga is a 2004 book of social and religious history by the scholar of modern yoga Elizabeth De Michelis. It introduced a typology of modern yoga including modern postural yoga.

A History of Modern Yoga is a 2004 book of social and religious history by the scholar of modern yoga Elizabeth De Michelis. Yoga became widespread in the Western world in the late 20th century, but received little academic attention until the 21st century, broadly starting with Elizabeth De Michelis's book, based on her doctoral thesis.

Patanjali and Western Esotericism. Article · January 2005 with 38 Reads. Contemporary Western European Feminism is a ground-breaking history of feminism. Gisela Kaplan invites a critical analysis of current ideas, terms and assumptions about our modern world. How we measure 'reads'. Cite this publication.

A History of Modern Yoga traces the roots of Modern Yoga back to the spread of western esoteric ideas in 18th century Bengal's intellectual circles. In due course Raja Yoga, published by Vivekananda in 1896, became the seminal text of Modern. Download (pdf, 1. 6 Mb) Donate Read. In due course Raja Yoga, published by Vivekananda in 1896, became the seminal text of Modern Yoga largely because, the author shows, it reconfigured the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali along the lines of a then emerging New Age occultistic style of secularised and individualistically oriented religiosity.

A History of Modern Yoga book. A History of Modern Yoga traces the roots of Modern Yoga back to the spread of western esoteric ideas in 18th century Bengal's intellectual circles. In due course Raja Yoga, published by Vivekananda in 1896, became the seminal text of Modern Yoga largely because, the author shows, it reconfigured the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali along the lines of a then emerging New Age occul A History of Modern Yoga traces the roots of Modern Yoga back to the spread of western esoteric ideas in 18th century.

Altglas Véronique, Elisabeth De Michelis, A History of Modern Yoga. Patanjali and Western Esotericism. New York – Londres, Continuum, 2004, 282 p. , Archives de sciences sociales des religions, 2005/3 (No 131-132), p. 26-26. MLA. Altglas, Véronique. Elisabeth De Michelis, A History of Modern Yoga. , Archives de sciences sociales des religions, vol. no 131-132, no. 3, 2005, pp.

A History of Modern Yoga. Elizabeth De Michelis. A history of modern yoga. Front cover photograph: by Andrea Rollefson, Ascent magazine, Fall 2001. I wish to thank all my colleagues and collaborators at CARTS and at the Faculty for their contribution in making my years of employment here so productive, enjoyable and stimulating.

A history of modern yoga: Patañjali and Western esotericism. De Michelis (faculty of Divinity, Cambridge) has made an important contribution to modern scholarship in religion with this history of yogic practice. Many readers will find her style dry in the.

De Michelis concludes her analysis as follows: "The misidentification between Vivekananda's raja yoga and the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali.

and the bhaktas are all longing for the. grace of the Lord Siva. De Michelis concludes her analysis as follows: "The misidentification between Vivekananda's raja yoga and the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. bet~ays a cognitive confusion which causes a typically esoteric variety of yoga. as the most important and universally applicable form of yoga" (. 79). Yet this misidentification of raja yoga and the Yoga Sutras is appropriated from Vivekananda into most forms of Modem Yoga.

A History of Modern Yoga traces the roots of Modern Yoga back to the spread of western esoteric ideas in 18th .

A History of Modern Yoga traces the roots of Modern Yoga back to the spread of western esoteric ideas in 18th century Bengal's intellectual circles. In due course Raja Yoga, published by Vivekananda in 1896, became the seminal text of Modern Yoga largely because, the author shows, it reconfigured the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali along the lines of a then emerging New Age occultistic style of secularised and individualistically oriented religiosity.

With regard to 20th century developments, this book proposes a four-fold typology of Modern Yoga comprising Modern Psychosomatic, Modern Meditational, Modern Postural and Modern Denominational forms. Iyengar Yoga, one of the most influential schools of Modern Postural Yoga, is then analyzed in the light of this framework, while the conclusion shows how a typical Modern Postural Yoga session may be interpreted to reveal the forms and contents of a healing ritual of secular religion.

Comments to eBook A History of Modern Yoga: Patanjali and Western Esotericism
Boyn
If you are serious about yoga and meditation, then you've got to read this book.

A History of Modern Yoga is a ground-breaking book, a historical masterpiece that ought to be required reading for all serious students of yoga. What is yoga? Where did it come from? How did it develop? How has it come to be as it is practiced today? These are some of the questions that our author, De Michelis, asked and answered in this book. She has collected hundreds of resources, books, and articles (see bibliography) and distilled for the reader a rich history and model for how modern yoga developed as known and practiced today.

Our author gives us a narrative account of how Modern Yoga started 150 years ago, its dominant personalities, and ways yoga developed to present. In A History of Modern Yoga De Michelis provides a compelling case history. She uses several famous and not-so-known personalities to demonstrate how they were able to successfully reinterpret classical Hindu-Patanjalic yoga and to combine yoga with Western esotericism (aka secret spiritual doctrines and mystical teachings).

Students of B.K.S. Iyengar and postural yoga will find De Michelis' book particularly enlightening. An entire chapter is about Iyengar Yoga--how it developed, Iyengar's life and work, and analyzed his teachings, teachers, and impact of his schools today. Also, yoga meditation practitioners will find De Michelis' historical analysis of Swami Vivekananda compelling. Our author demonstrates how the Swami's 1896 Raja Yoga philosophy influenced all modern yoga gurus and yoga schools to date.

De Michelis' provides us with a helpful typology for understanding and classifying four types of yoga and their schools of practice that have developed from 1896 to present:
- Modern Postural Yoga - emphasis on physical postures
- Modern Meditational Yoga - mostly contemplative or concentrative exercises
- Modern Denominational Yoga - less emphasis on yoga methods, more focus on leader
- Modern Psychosomatic Yoga - broad body-mind-spirit training

Of course, there's overlap with some of these types and schools. Nothing fits necessarily into a neat little box or category.

Readers ought to note that the author is a Religious studies scholar and Indic-Yoga historian. Her history of yoga contains some academic sounding terms like "cultic milieu", "gnosis", and "epistemology". But, if you do like I did, and while reading consulted Mr Google or a dictionary, you will quickly grasp why she uses these terms and that they help provide a clearer understanding of the social, religious, and historical analysis. Scholars of Yoga provide, laypersons like myself, a richer, more holistic picture of the actual phenomenon of modern yoga. Versus limiting our research and studies using ONLY yoga resources written by yoga gurus, instructors, or follower-sympathizers (De Michelis and scholars use the term "hagiographies"--accounts that idealize their subject).

I wished I'd read A History of Modern Yoga many moons ago before I'd been ordained a monk for 14 years in a Swami Monastic Order. I'd have been better informed, more knowledgable of the actual history and practices of Modern Yoga. I write and blog at Skeptic Meditations about my experiences and explore the hidden side of yoga, meditation, and mindfulness. Readers of this book review will find my short blog posts useful in revealing more about the contents of this book. My blog is Skeptic Meditations. See my blog posts of this book under "Yoga" in the categories or index.

In her Introduction, A History of Modern Yoga: Patanjali and Western Esotericism--
"If more people were to study the history, roots and beliefs of Modern Yoga more carefully (that is, among other things, by trying to exercise more intellectual discrimination)" writes De Michelis, who strongly believes, "this could be of great benefit not only to practitioners of Modern Yoga, but also to academics and intellectuals in general".
Lonesome Orange Kid
This book is highly refreshing scholarship. It details the historical interaction of the British empire and India (mainly West Bengal), and thus the mutual East-West influences that have shaped modern yogic thought. It also evaluates the Iyngar yogic school. For anyone interested in a serious intellectual study of yoga by a Western academic this book is excellent. The citations also provide links to the few other such studies. One can only hope this type of scholarship continues to move forward and Dr. Elizabeth De Michelis sets an excellent example for future workers to follow.
Zeus Wooden
I was disappointed with this book - to my mind it is written for a much more academic audience. I am familiar with yoga - I've read a couple of other books which I enjoyed, including yoga body and origins of yoga and tantra - but this one just seemed to require much more knowledge. I understand that this is the academic style, you don't spend time writing what someone else has written, but it's jarring to constantly be told, to find out what this guru thought, check on some out-of-print book from 1976. I understood the differences between Vivekenanda and his gurus and what was borrowed east-to-west, but never really understood how that differed from classic hindu/vedic belief, and how what yoga might have meant in the time of Patanjali. The writing is also in a more academic style - e.g., not a lot of emphasis on style or telling things as a story, more emphasis on constructing a analytic argument for researchers.
Also, most of the sanskrit terms are not translated or given enough explanation.

What would have been good for me is the same material with more background, written in an intelligent but more popular style. I think people who get the most out of this book are those who really know the base material well and are looking specifically to understand how Vivekananda developed his ideas and teachings.

Here's an excerpt, p. 154:
"Raja Yoga follows Samkhya-Yoga cosmology in postulating an original duality of purusa and prakrti. A sentient but actionless purusa casues by his mysterious influence the manifestation of all the forms implicit in prakrti, the dynamic and creative matrix of all manifestation. Beyond this point however,Raja Yoga's cosmology becomes quite different from the Samkhya-Yoga one. The latter is well known (footnote: a good summary is found in Michael (1980)) and will only be briefly summarized here, Samkhya Yoga postulates the existence of three gunas (literally "threads", meaning primodial qualities) as composing prakrti. It is the perfect equilibrium of these that the purusa disturbs by way of its mysterious influence, thereby initiating a cycle of manifestation. Difference combinations of these three gunas are found throughout the resulting emanational chain...
Mitynarit
Interesting, well researched and accessible.
Tejar
This is a well researched scholarly work, but falls short of a proper study of Modern Yoga. It gives great structure in its historical approach up to Vivekananda (1900), but then jumps a half of century of research between the years 1900-1950 and skips directly to Iyengar. I feel short-changed.
Balladolbine
The book and the seller are great!
Mr.jeka
The book is a must for serious Yoga people. if you have trouble with some of the words, just be patient.
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