» » Desert Terroir: Exploring the Unique Flavors and Sundry Places of the Borderlands (Ellen and Edward Randall Series)

Fb2 Desert Terroir: Exploring the Unique Flavors and Sundry Places of the Borderlands (Ellen and Edward Randall Series) ePub

by Gary Paul Nabhan

Category: Regional and International
Subcategory: Food and Cooking
Author: Gary Paul Nabhan
ISBN: 0292725892
ISBN13: 978-0292725898
Language: English
Publisher: University of Texas Press (March 1, 2012)
Pages: 144
Fb2 eBook: 1871 kb
ePub eBook: 1490 kb
Digital formats: mobi lrf lrf rtf

Gary Paul Nabhan is an internationally celebrated desert explorer, plant hunter, and storyteller of the . gary nabhan has written another book as good as his 1985 offering of gathering the desert.

Gary Paul Nabhan is an internationally celebrated desert explorer, plant hunter, and storyteller of the . it is part travelogue, part heritage food xploration, and a good dose of mixing with the local cultures. there is alot of good history on how some old world foods ended up in the americas and vice versa. along the way in the travels you will meet.

Ellen and Edward Randall. It is found, too, in the ancestry of both human and plants. If we attune ourselves to our own history, and to that of the natural world, we stand to gain a keen appreciation for our planet's myriad distinctive tastesâ?Š Nabhan is a natural storyteller.

Series: Ellen and Edward Randall Endowment.

I've read a couple other books by Gary Paul Nabhan, an ethnobotanist who focuses on the plants and traditional foods of the US Southwest. He always provides unexpected views of parts of history I didn't know.

Ellen & Edward Randall Series. Gary Paul Nabhan is an internationally celebrated desert explorer, plant hunter, and storyteller of the .

Gary Paul Nabhan’s new book, Desert Terroir: Exploring the unique flavors and . Like other proponents of terroir, Nabhan argues that sunlight, wind, rain and minerals in the soil all affect the way a given food tastes.

Like other proponents of terroir, Nabhan argues that sunlight, wind, rain and minerals in the soil all affect the way a given food tastes. But for him there is more.

In this landmark book, Gary Paul Nabhan takes us on a personal trip into the . Ellen and Edward Randall Series. University of Texas Press.

Ellen and Edward Randall Series.

Why does food taste better when you know where it comes from? Because history—ecological, cultural, even personal—flavors every bite we eat. Whether it’s the volatile chemical compounds that a plant absorbs from the soil or the stories and memories of places that are evoked by taste, layers of flavor await those willing to delve into the roots of real food. In this landmark book, Gary Paul Nabhan takes us on a personal trip into the southwestern borderlands to discover the terroir—the “taste of the place”—that makes this desert so delicious.

To savor the terroir of the borderlands, Nabhan presents a cornucopia of local foods—Mexican oregano, mesquite-flour tortillas, grass-fed beef, the popular Mexican dessert capirotada, and corvina (croaker or drum fish) among them—as well as food experiences that range from the foraging of Cabeza de Vaca and his shipwrecked companions to a modern-day camping expedition on the Rio Grande. Nabhan explores everything from the biochemical agents that create taste in these foods to their history and dispersion around the world. Through his field adventures and humorous stories, we learn why Mexican oregano is most potent when gathered at the most arid margins of its range—and why foods found in the remote regions of the borderlands have surprising connections to foods found by his ancestors in the deserts of the Mediterranean and the Middle East. By the end of his movable feast, Nabhan convinces us that the roots of this fascinating terroir must be anchored in our imaginations as well as in our shifting soils.

Comments to eBook Desert Terroir: Exploring the Unique Flavors and Sundry Places of the Borderlands (Ellen and Edward Randall Series)
Mave
gary nabhan has written another book as good as his 1985 offering of gathering the desert. it is part travelogue, part heritage food xploration, and a good dose of mixing with the local cultures. there is alot of good history on how some old world foods ended up in the americas and vice versa. along the way in the travels you will meet some interesting people, hidden oases and other locations, and get acquainted with some beasts of burden! this is the kind of book that you can certainly read at home, but i would suggest to really savor it, take it along backpacking, or sit down under a ponderosa pine in the summer, or a saguaro in the winter and read it!
WtePSeLNaGAyko
I just reread this short book. I like Nabhan's writing. This book (as with some of his others) is heavy with personal accounts of interacting with many people, in this book people who deal with some aspect of food in the desert area of the Southwest US and adjoining Mexico. For example, he has a chapter on fishing with Mexican fishermen (no women) in the Gulf of California, a fine chapter; and getting a Hispanic woman to make him some mesquite tortillas, which she later starts a business doing. The stories are lively, excellent and usually positive. Nabhan sometimes makes loaded comments, such as his story of boating down the Rio Grande sampling local cuisines on both sides of the river, which he now notes has been completely closed off by Homeland Security.

As readers of his books will know, Nabhan is an American of Lebanese (and ultimately Omani) origin, making connections with the American and Middle Eastern deserts. He describes grass-grown cattle and traces their origin to Mexico, the Canary Islands, Spain and Morocco. In a little place in Baja, he sees traces of Moorish and Sephardic Jewish culture. And of course, terroir because all the stories center on food.

He intermixes history as well. The first chapter discusses Mostafa al-Azemmouri, a Moroccan Muslim, converted to Christianity as a slave, better known as Esteban with the four survivors of Cabeza de Vaca's expedition, told through how Mostafa/ Esteban would have found similarities with the African desert he knew. Then there's the chapter, somewhat wry, about camel chorizo, which tells of eating camel, and also much about Hadji Ali, the chief cameleer (if that's a word) for the US Army, which brought camels and Hadji Ali to Texas in the late 1850s. Both stories, please note, along with his own, show people of Arab and Muslim background to be part of American history.
Mopimicr
I think this might be Gary Nabhan's best work since Coming Home to Eat. For those who aren't familiar with him, Nabhan is an ethnobotanist who writes beautifully about the intersection of food, culture, and geography.

In Desert Terroir, he focuses on the flavors of the US/Mexico borderlands. He details the tastes and traditions of foods like mesquite, fish, and camels. There is a good bit of history in this book, including an extremely interesting section on some shipwrecked Moroccons and Spaniards who traveled across the Southwest in the 1500s.

Nabhan is a talented storyteller, and he is able to describe sensory details so well that you almost feel like you have already experienced what he is writing about. I'd also like to mention that the illustrations (done by Paul Mirocha) are a perfect fit for the book and really add more depth to the whole story.
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