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Fb2 Taste of America ePub

by John L. Hess,Karen Hess

Category: Cooking Education and Reference
Subcategory: Food and Cooking
Author: John L. Hess,Karen Hess
ISBN: 0872496406
ISBN13: 978-0872496408
Language: English
Publisher: Univ of South Carolina Pr; Subsequent edition (July 1, 1989)
Pages: 384
Fb2 eBook: 1571 kb
ePub eBook: 1557 kb
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Karen Loft Hess (November 11, 1918 – May 15, 2007) was an American culinary historian.

Karen Loft Hess (November 11, 1918 – May 15, 2007) was an American culinary historian. Her 1977 book The Taste of America co-authored with her late husband, John L. Hess, established them as anti-establishment members of the culinary world. Born in Blair, Nebraska, she attended Humboldt State University in Arcata, California, where she majored in music.

The Taste of America is an entertaining diatribe on the diet of the tribe

The Taste of America is an entertaining diatribe on the diet of the tribe. It should be read and pondered". Based on the superlative authority of John L. Hess, onetime food critic of the New York Times, and Karen Hess, the pioneering historian of cookery, The Taste of America is both a history of American cooking and a history of the advice smiling celebrity cooks have asked Americans to swallow. The Taste of America provoked the cooking experts of the 1970s into spitting rage by pointing out in embarrassing detail that most of them lacked an essential ingredient: expertise.

Библиографические данные. The Taste of America The Food Series (Том 21).

The Taste of America. An updated and delightful tour through gastronomic America

The Taste of America. An updated and delightful tour through gastronomic America. This classic barbeque of our foodways is as valid and as savory today as when it first tickled ribs a generation ago. by. Hess, John L. Publication date. Hess, Karen, joint author. Food, Cooking, Food industry and trade. New York : Grossman Publishers. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control). Books for People with Print Disabilities. Oliver Wendell Holmes Library.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of John L. Hess's books. John L. Hess’s Followers. None yet. Hess. Hess’s books. The Taste of America by. Hess, Karen Hess.

Readers who remember John Hess' all-too-brief . Altogether, the Hesses give us enough refreshing good sense and conscience for a lifetime. A long-overdue book, marred but not vitiated by some crude rhetorical excesses.

Readers who remember John Hess' all-too-brief stint as Times food critic will know what to expect: a crusading attack on the culinary abuses of the food industry and the frequent idiocies of the cooking writers. Fannie Farmer, say the Hesses, debased the rich, sophisticated culinary heritage which they charmingly document from dozens of earlier American cookbooks. In her wake came decades of sugared bread and pseudo-scientific cant.

John L. Hess & Karen Hess. Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. The taste of America John L. Book's title: The taste of America John L. Library of Congress Control Number: 76041871.

Her 1977 book "The Taste of America" co-authored with her late husband, John L. Hess, established them as. . In 1985, Hess became one of the founding members of The Culinary Historians of New York, an association of food professionals, historians, and others interested in studying and writing on the history of food.

Karen Hess, an American culinary historian who brought an academic rigor to the study of recipes, cooking techniques and .

Karen Hess, an American culinary historian who brought an academic rigor to the study of recipes, cooking techniques and ordinary American kitchen practices, died Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 88. She died after suffering a stroke the week before, her son Peter Hess said. Her first book, The Taste of America, written with her husband, John L. Hess, and published in 1977, established right away that the couple would not be joining the chorus of affirmation that had characterized the American food establishment. We write with trepidation, the book opened.

The Taste of America is both a history of American cooking and a history of the advice smiling celebrity cooks have asked Americans to swallow.
Comments to eBook Taste of America
Ieslyaenn
After reading this book for the first time in the early 1980s, it changed the way I thought about both choosing what to feast upon and how to prepare it. I always wondered why I hated vegetables as a child. Having read the book, I realized that my mother--loving though she may have been--had cooked vegetables to death by boiling everything until it was soft, tasteless and unappetizing. When I began learning to cook for myself, the beauty of this text came through for me. Now I appreciate vegetables because I prepare them simply and let the flavor come through. I recommend this book to anyone who is a "picky" eater (and even to those who are not). Once you know why you don't like a variety of foods, you may discover that it's not the food you learned detest, but the way Mama cooked it for you!
Nalaylewe
Good
OTANO
Good book for those of us who want to understand "what happened to American food"
Larosa
Cooking and America, not a better subject to be found. Well written and a keeper.
Hawk Flying
What a delight to find this amazing classic back in print, in a reprint
edition with new comments by the authors. This will spare thousands
of food enthusiasts the perennial burden of scouring the used-book
market for copies of it. (I ordered several copies of the reprint at once
for gifts and to have on hand.) People who were following food
writing at the time will recall the stir created by the Hesses' book when
it first appeared in the late 1970s. The book is iconoclastic, even
subversive, in the same sense as Prometheus's gift of fire to mankind.
In this case the gift is not fire but perspective, or a sense of history.
Co-author John Hess was himself a senior and very experienced
food writer and editor, but he has a scholar's dislike of pretentious
misinformation being quoted around until it becomes conventional
wisdom. Karen Hess is a food historian noted elsewhere for her
work on the mysterious "Martha Washington" cookbook.
Their book addresses questions like: How did things like iceberg
lettuce and phony "gourmet" products displace centuries of fine
immigrant and indigenous cooking wisdom in the US? Who helped
to "sell" such changes, only to be celebrated later (Orwellian-style)
for contributions to US cooking? Moreover, it is remarkable to see
how many "innovations" in US cooking since about the time this book
was written consist actually of rediscovery of principles widely known
100 or 200 years ago, as the book documents in detail.
The casual reader should be forgiven for not having heard of all
of this in the general media. Journalism in the US about food (and not
only about food) is lately graced with legions of people blissfully
and confidently unconscious of anything that preceded their own words.
Such people will gush uncritically about food pundits like Craig
Claiborne (distinguished on the basis that the gushing writers
have heard of them) without any real research or perspective.
These writers would not do so if they read the Hesses' book.
From the Hesses', and other, evidence it seems that around the
1950s, "gourmet" became a convenience-food-industry euphemism for
"sucker" in the US. "That flabby midget called Cornish game hen was,
next to chocolate-covered ants, the gourmet racket's funniest joke on a
gullible public. It has no more taste of game than a wad of cotton," say
the Hesses. Such game hens are one of several gimmicks Craig
Claiborne is quoted pushing; canned beef gravy and instant whipped
potatoes are others. Claiborne receives especial attention here,
though James Beard, the Rombauers, Fannie Farmer, even JC Herself,
are not spared. Yet this criticism is constructive, at least for the reader,
with positive counterexamples.
It is an angry, or perhaps indignant, book but an informed one,
meticulous in its documentation of sources. The bibliography by itself is
valuable, sort of an annotated miniature of Katherine Bitting's epic 1939
"Gastronomic Bibliography" (also cited; that book is very expensive
on the used market; I know because I own one; even its 1980s reprint is
expensive and I am told, unlike the original, is printed on acid paper).
*Nameless*
The best thanksgiving recipes ever
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