» » We Are What We Eat: Ethnic Food and the Making of Americans

Fb2 We Are What We Eat: Ethnic Food and the Making of Americans ePub

by Donna R. Gabaccia

Category: Cooking Education and Reference
Subcategory: Food and Cooking
Author: Donna R. Gabaccia
ISBN: 0674948602
ISBN13: 978-0674948600
Language: English
Publisher: Harvard University Press; Annotated edition edition (May 19, 1998)
Pages: 288
Fb2 eBook: 1391 kb
ePub eBook: 1806 kb
Digital formats: lrf txt docx lrf

Donna R. Gabaccia serves up an intriguing appetizer on the growing menu of food history. The book raises intriguing and important questions regarding the cultural meaning of food and the significance of foodways in social change. Susan Levine Journal of American History)

Donna R. Susan Levine Journal of American History).

Gabaccia insists that food is one area where America has become, if not a melting pot, at least a. .But a more cheering indication of ethnic influence on the American palate is salsa, which "dethroned ketchup as the king of American condiments in total sales in 1991".

Gabaccia insists that food is one area where America has become, if not a melting pot, at least a communal salad bowl. After initial hesitation, colonial settlers avidly incorporated local ingredients in traditional dishes. Baking powder evolved from the Native American use of ash as a flavouring in cooking. Puritan housewives used local pumpkins for marmalade and pie-fillings. Mcdonald's New York City New York State Philadelphia.

Donna Gabaccia invites us to consider: If we are what we eat, who are we? Americans' multi-ethnic eating is a constant reminder of how widespread, and mutually enjoyable, ethnic interaction has sometimes been in the United.

Donna Gabaccia invites us to consider: If we are what we eat, who are we? Americans' multi-ethnic eating is a constant reminder of how widespread, and mutually enjoyable, ethnic interaction has sometimes been in the United States. Ghulam Bombaywala sells bagels in Houston. Demetrios dishes up pizza in Connecticut. The Wangs serve tacos in Los Angeles. How ethnicity has influenced American eating habits-and thus, the make-up and direction of the American cultural mainstream-is the story told in We Are What We Eat.

Contents Introduction: What Do We Eat? 1 1 Colonial Creoles 10 2 Immigration, Isolation, and Industry 36 3 Ethnic Entrepreneurs 64 4 Crossing the Boundaries of Taste 93 5 Food Fights and American Values 122 6 The Big Business of Eating 149 7 Of Cookbooks and Culinary Roots.

Contents Introduction: What Do We Eat? 1 1 Colonial Creoles 10 2 Immigration, Isolation, and Industry 36 3 Ethnic Entrepreneurs 64 4 Crossing the Boundaries of Taste 93 5 Food Fights and American Values 122 6 The Big Business of Eating 149 7 Of Cookbooks and Culinary Roots 175 8 Nouvelle Creole 202 Conclusion: Who Are We? 225 Sources 235 Notes 243 Acknowledgments 269 Index 273 INTRODUCTION What Do We Eat?

China to Chinatown: Chinese Food in the West. London: Reaktion Books. In The Taste of American Place: A Reader on Regional and Ethnic Foods.

Making and Remaking Asian America through Immigration Policy, 1850- 1990. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Hooker, Richard J. 1978. China to Chinatown: Chinese Food in the West. Root, Waverly and Richard de Rochemont. Eating America: A History. Hopewell, New Jersey: The Ecco Press. Sarna, Jonathan D. 1990. The Problem of Christmas and the ‘National Faith. Barbara G. Shortridge & James R. Shortridge, eds. New York: Roman and Littlefield, pp. 163-84. Wu, David Y. H. and Sidney Cheung, eds.

Mobile version (beta). We Are What We Eat: Ethnic Food and the Making of Americans. Download (pdf, 1008 Kb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

For example, Gabaccia traces New England cuisine and how it differs from the culinary practices and food resources of the southwest, southeast, and midwest.

To discuss American identity, at least expressed through our eating habits, involves excursion into the histories of agriculture, business, and consumption" (p. 235). For example, Gabaccia traces New England cuisine and how it differs from the culinary practices and food resources of the southwest, southeast, and midwest.

Donna R. Gabaccia, a professor of American history, explores how ethnicity has influenced the eating habits of Americans and determines that America is not .

Gabaccia, Donna R. (2000), We Are What We Eat: Ethnic Food and the Making of Americans, Harvard University Press, ISBN 978-0-674-0019. HRHAS, (Honolulu Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society) (1850), Transactions of the Royal Hawaiian Agricultural Society, 1. no. 1, Honolulu, HI: Henry M. Whitney, pp. 45–46. Henderson, Janice Wald (1994), The New Cuisine of Hawaii: Recipes from the Twelve Celebrated Chefs of Hawaii Regional Cuisine, New York: Villard Books, ISBN 978-0-679-42529-8.

Contents Introduction: What Do We Eat? 1 1 Colonial Creoles 10 2 Immigration, Isolation, and Industry 36 3 Ethnic Entrepreneurs 64 4 Crossing the Boundaries of Taste 93 5 Food Fights and American Values 122 6 The Big Business of Eating 149 7 Of Cookbooks and Culinary Roots 175 8 Nouvelle Creole 202 Conclusion: Who Are We? 225 Sources 235 Notes 243 Acknowledgments 269 Index 273 INTRODUCTION What Do We Eat?

Mobile version (beta).

China to Chinatown: Chinese Food in the West.

Ghulam Bombaywala sells bagels in Houston. Demetrios dishes up pizza in Connecticut. The Wangs serve tacos in Los Angeles. How ethnicity has influenced American eating habits--and thus, the make-up and direction of the American cultural mainstream--is the story told in We Are What We Eat. It is a complex tale of ethnic mingling and borrowing, of entrepreneurship and connoisseurship, of food as a social and political symbol and weapon--and a thoroughly entertaining history of our culinary tradition of multiculturalism.

The story of successive generations of Americans experimenting with their new neighbors' foods highlights the marketplace as an important arena for defining and expressing ethnic identities and relationships. We Are What We Eat follows the fortunes of dozens of enterprising immigrant cooks and grocers, street hawkers and restaurateurs who have cultivated and changed the tastes of native-born Americans from the seventeenth century to the present. It also tells of the mass corporate production of foods like spaghetti, bagels, corn chips, and salsa, obliterating their ethnic identities. The book draws a surprisingly peaceful picture of American ethnic relations, in which "Americanized" foods like Spaghetti-Os happily coexist with painstakingly pure ethnic dishes and creative hybrids.

Donna Gabaccia invites us to consider: If we are what we eat, who are we? Americans' multi-ethnic eating is a constant reminder of how widespread, and mutually enjoyable, ethnic interaction has sometimes been in the United States. Amid our wrangling over immigration and tribal differences, it reveals that on a basic level, in the way we sustain life and seek pleasure, we are all multicultural.

Comments to eBook We Are What We Eat: Ethnic Food and the Making of Americans
Broadraven
This book is a moderately interesting discussion of the role ehtnic cuisine has played in the United States through history. I had expected a more focused discussion of specific foods and ethnicities and wider exploration of the interplay between food and culture. This book just doesn't have the depth I had hoped for. The books main focus is on the acceptance or lack thereof of ethnic foods in America. It doesn't explore the impact food has on culture very thoroughly.
Reemiel
I picked up this book in hope of mitigating the intensity of reading back-to-back some very tenacious literature and historical fiction. It was a miscalculation. We Are What We Eat, though interesting in the premise, is nothing but a harangue of facts and data. Some cheese were 80 cents to $1.60 a pound. Some 60,000 people in the industry in 1910 produced some 50 million gallons of wine in California. Nationwide, consumers of inexpensive meals spend $29 million in small mom-and-pop restaurants and $23 billion in fast food chains. New Yorkers tend to patronize less on fast food because family values are emphasized more. The facts go on and on.
The book is a tantalizing (well, it really tires) treatise that examines the evolution and identity of our nation through the ethnically diverse food/cuisines Americans intake from colonial periods to the present. The account begins with the "first Americans", namely the first peoples on the continent: the Native Americans, European-Americans, and African Americans. The subgroups of the European Americans formed some of the major food manufacturers and grocery chains that influentially set the so-called American eating-habits (often too ashamed to be known as American cuisine). From there, the book is a tale of mixing and borrowing and intermingling within the recipes and tastes of different cultural groups, between entrepreneurship and connoisseurship.
The book certainly aims higher than it actually manages. While the author substantially focuses on the origins and thus the fortunes of the enterprising immigrant cooks and grocers, the book fails to discuss and pinpoint the crossing between food and culture. Such deficiency is especially salient in the chapter titled "Nouvelle Creole", in which the Asian influence of dining was mentioned in passing over two pages. The establishment of Benihana (which I do not consider an authentic Japanese restaurant) was mentioned and nothing specific from Chinese cooking was discussed at all. And what about Malaysian cuisine that shaped the dining industry in New York? And the Puerto Rican?
The bottomline of the book is really the acceptance or rejection of ethnic foods in America, instead of an objective, fine-balanced, and compendious account on the impact food has on the American culture. While the book discusses in gush details some of the major (especially the well-known ones from the East Coast) food products and brand names that shape the national identity, it completely ignores the minority cuisines and tastes. 2.5 stars.
Related to We Are What We Eat: Ethnic Food and the Making of Americans
Ethnicity and Inequality in Hawai'i (Asian American History Cultu) eBook
Fb2 Ethnicity and Inequality in Hawai'i (Asian American History  Cultu) ePub
Locating Filipino Americans (Asian American History Cultu) eBook
Fb2 Locating Filipino Americans (Asian American History  Cultu) ePub
Aging Among Japanese American Immigrants: Activating Ethnicity (Studies in Asian Americans) eBook
Fb2 Aging Among Japanese American Immigrants: Activating Ethnicity (Studies in Asian Americans) ePub
Racial and Ethnic Groups, 8th Edition eBook
Fb2 Racial and Ethnic Groups, 8th Edition ePub
The Earth Knows My Name: Food, Culture, and Sustainability in the Gardens of Ethnic Americans eBook
Fb2 The Earth Knows My Name: Food, Culture, and Sustainability in the Gardens of Ethnic Americans ePub
Walls and Mirrors: Mexican Americans, Mexican Immigrants, and the Politics of Ethnicity eBook
Fb2 Walls and Mirrors: Mexican Americans, Mexican Immigrants, and the Politics of Ethnicity ePub
Dynamics of Ethnic Identity: Three Asian American Communities in Philadelphia (Studies in Asian Americans) eBook
Fb2 Dynamics of Ethnic Identity: Three Asian American Communities in Philadelphia (Studies in Asian Americans) ePub
Making Ethnic Choices: California's Punjabi Mexican Americans (Asian American History Cultu) eBook
Fb2 Making Ethnic Choices: California's Punjabi Mexican Americans (Asian American History  Cultu) ePub
Asian American Ethnicity and Communication eBook
Fb2 Asian American Ethnicity and Communication ePub