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Fb2 The Memory of Love: A Novel ePub

by Linda Olsson

Category: Womens Fiction
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Linda Olsson
ISBN: 0143122436
ISBN13: 978-0143122432
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Books; 1 edition (February 26, 2013)
Fb2 eBook: 1384 kb
ePub eBook: 1664 kb
Digital formats: azw mbr lrf mobi

Olsson masterfully draws the reader into the present relationships and past history of her characters.

Olsson masterfully draws the reader into the present relationships and past history of her characters. In this novel, Marion Flint is the isolate who is starting to form relationships with those in her current world. The present setting is New Zealand; flashbacks occur in England and Sweden. Unfortunately, those flashbacks are initially hard for the reader to put together, and I found Marion’s past just too tragic

Linda's first novel Astrid & Veronika became an international success, selling hundreds of thousands of copies in Scandinavia, Europe and the United States

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Linda's first novel Astrid & Veronika became an international success, selling hundreds of thousands of copies in Scandinavia, Europe and the United States. It was followed by the heartbreaking and moving Sonata for Miriam. Olsson divides her time between Auckland, New Zealand and Stockholm, Sweden. Библиографические данные. The Memory of Love: A Novel. Издание: перепечатанное.

Linda Olsson’s novel casts the themes of secrecy, passion, and loss in the shape of a double helix, intertwining .

Linda Olsson’s novel casts the themes of secrecy, passion, and loss in the shape of a double helix, intertwining the stories of two wome. .Natural and vivid, utterly convincin. imply so beguiling. Linda Olsson evokes, with great precision and beauty, the landscape of a friendshi.Linda Olsson was born in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1948. She graduated from the University of Stockholm with a law degree and worked in law and finance until she left Sweden in 1986.

Электронная книга "Sonata for Miriam: A Novel", Linda Olsson. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Sonata for Miriam: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Memory of Love book. Here is Olsson doing what she does best: illuminating the terrain of friendship and examining the many forms that love can take. Marion Flint, in her early fifties, has spent fifteen years From the beloved author of Astrid & Veronika, a moving tale of friendship and redemption. Fans of Astrid & Veronika and Chris Cleave's Little Bee will be thrilled to read Linda Olsson's third novel.

Here is Olsson doing what she does best: illuminating the terrain of friendship and examining the many forms that love can take

Here is Olsson doing what she does best: illuminating the terrain of friendship and examining the many forms that love can take. Marion Flint, in her early fifties, has spent fifteen years living a quiet life on the rugged coast of New Zealand, a life that allows the door to her past to remain firmly shut.

Linda Olsson (born 1948) is a Swedish-born novelist who lives in Auckland, New Zealand. She writes in both English and Swedish. Born in Stockholm in 1948, Olsson was raised there by working-class parents. After graduating in law from the University of Stockholm, she worked in banking and finance, married and gave birth to three sons.

Linda Olsson writes beautifully, capturing the fragile nature of her characters and the beauty of the rugged .

Linda Olsson writes beautifully, capturing the fragile nature of her characters and the beauty of the rugged landscape around her with great precision and subtlety. Otago Times (New Zealand). Haunting and beautiful, is a reminder of the fragility of happiness and the impossibility of living without hope. The Star (New Zealand).

Linda Olsson is a Swedish author who currently resides in Auckland, New Zealand from where she writes her contemporary fiction. Olsson herself writes in Swedish and English. Linda was born in Stockholm in 1948 and has lived in a variety of countries including Japan, Britain, Singapore, and Kenya before she settled in New Zealand.

There were no sounds from the bedroom. I lay still, thinking. to do. I needed to talk to the. I needed to talk to the grandmother, but of course this was likely to complicate things. I didn’t know what to tell Ika, either. Nothing had cleared overnight. I needn’t have worried. It didn’t really matter what decisions I made. What plans I might have. A chain of events had already been set in motion

Used and good condition
Comments to eBook The Memory of Love: A Novel
Cashoutmaster
Hey, wait a minute, didn't I just review this? No, but I came upon it when reviewing another book of the same title by Aminatta Forna. And my review title is borrowed from two other novels that have also recently appeared (by Kate Atkinson and Jill McCorkle). Both titles are eminently suited to Linda Olsson's new novel, though it is smaller in scale and less ambitious in theme than any of the others.

I have greatly enjoyed Olsson's previous novels, ASTRID AND VERONIKA and SONATA FOR MIRIAM, for the quiet interiority of her writing. I have also admired her ability to use the sparse landscapes of Sweden or New Zealand as a foil for the emotional lives of her mostly female characters. Both countries play a part here. The actual setting is the thinly-populated New Zealand coast southwest of Auckland on the North Island, where Marion Flint, a woman in early middle age, semi-retired physician and part-time artist, has fled to handle some nameless grief alone; there are hints of a deceased husband or lover. But most of the memories that return to her in italicized flashbacks of increasing frequency are of her childhood, first on an idyllic island between Sweden and Finland, and later in Stockholm and London. It is clear that Marion is an emotionally damaged woman, though it will be a long time before we discover exactly how the various phases of her life connect up.

The catalyst is a small boy called Ika, who begins drifting into her life, visiting most Thursdays. He appears to be somewhat autistic and uncommunicative, but he has real gifts for art and for music. [Music plays a significant part here as in Olsson's other books, Bill Evans' "Peace Piece" especially setting the tone for the latter part of the novel.] The book has a slow beginning, but then something happens that accelerates both Marion's present-day actions and the flood of her memories. She finds herself having to reach out to her neighbors, take actions that might have legal consequences, and come to terms with what Ika means in her life.

The book is very much about second, third, and even fourth chances, starting another life after the previous one had effectively ended. We will learn about traumas that effectively tore Marion's childhood life into three separate fragments, and we will see them echoed in the painful fissures that ripped apart her adult one. My only complaint about the novel is that these reflections are just too obviously planned. You notice this at first in a too-close parallel between casual events in the present and the memories that they trigger. Later, the story comes to depend on one huge coincidence and a number of minor ones that would be enough to make some readers I know throw the book at the wall in disgust. But not me. For I know Olsson to be a musician, and if she wants to compose a novel as one might a sonata, with themes and variations and recapitulation, then I am willing to accept the artifice. Besides, I had come to care for the people, and ended the book with tears in my eyes. Tears of contentment. Tears of homecoming.
Chinon
Once I had read Astrid and Veronika, I knew it would not be the last book I'd be reading by Olsson. I loved The Memory of Love. I loved the setting. I become totally Olsson's stories. I love how she writes - I "feel" her descriptions of things - I am provoked to much highlighting:

"There was sand inside and out. It no longer bothered me and I had long given up all efforts at keeping it off the floors. I spent most of my time outside and I liked the idea that the distinction between inside and outside had become increasingly blurred. It was as if the house and all it contained was slowly dissolving and would eventually become one with the sand it sat on."

"I knew that most people would say the house needed paint. But I liked it as it was, polished by the wind and the salt from the sea. It had become a soft grey, in some lights almost silvery, and the boards were smooth and soft to the touch."

"I had been thinking about that, this giving and taking. I had come to think that there were two kinds of people: those who produced and created, and those who lived off other people's labour."

"But something seemed to have abruptly ripped open. It surprised me that I didn't feel exposed. Instead, I was filled with an inexplicable sense of anticipation. As if this opening of doors and tearing away of layers was a positive thing. Perhaps I was hoping it would help me to put the events of my life in some kind of order, help me see it as a whole. It was difficult to understand why this suddenly felt so important, when in the past the ability to close the door behind each segment of my life had seemed vital to my survival."

"I had nurtured my important memories and been careful not to wear them down or alter them in any way. I had tried to keep them safe, but they were not kept in order. I knew absolutely where each one was, and what it contained, but it existed in a kind of vacuum, separate from the others. I had come to think that if I were able to take them out one by one and place them in the right sequence, perhaps they would be easier to carry. The painful ones might become more bearable if I could see each one as belonging to what went before and what came after. I think I was hoping for some understanding, And forgiveness perhaps. Not from others, but from myself so that I could finally regard myself with a measure of compassion. Empathy, perhaps. For the little girl that was me, for the young woman I had been, and for the middle-aged person I had now become. I think I was hoping for the memories to merge, to become an understandable whole. And ultimately make me whole."

"But far-fetched things do happen I think we are surrounded by extraordinary possibilities. Whether we are aware of them or not, whether we choose to act on them or not, they are there. Chance meetings and coincidences become extraordinary only when acted upon. Those we allow to pass us by are gone forever. We never know where they might have taken us. I think they were never meant to happen. The potential was there, but only for the briefest moment, before we consciously or unconsciously chose to ignore it."

"But we've only human, Marion. Sometimes we do what our heart tells us. And sometimes that is the right thing to do, but sometimes it's not. Our emotions can take us down the wrong track and we end up making things worse, for all the very best reasons."

"It is at the point of transition that awareness is created. The step into another state changes everything."

Allow yourself to be carried away by this beautiful story.
Alexandra
Linda Olsson is one of my favorite new authors. I had been lucky enough to stumble across "Astrid and Veronika" and have then gone on to read EVERYTHING she has written...including this book. Such an original story, so well told, I ached and held my breath while reading it. Marion finds her own strength in examining herself via the fragility and dour circumstances of a little boy, initially, almost beyond reach. Their relationship and the words expressed to tell it, are reflected perfectly in their own broken mirrors. Linda Olsson is a remarkable writer. I savor every delicious and tender word when reading her books and this one is a feast, subtil, yet perfect.
Geny
Linda Olsson’s Astrid and Veronika is one of my favorite books, so I was eager to read The Memory of Love. Olsson masterfully draws the reader into the present relationships and past history of her characters. In this novel, Marion Flint is the isolate who is starting to form relationships with those in her current world. The present setting is New Zealand; flashbacks occur in England and Sweden. Unfortunately, those flashbacks are initially hard for the reader to put together, and I found Marion’s past just too tragic. Although I really like Olsson’s writing and the book does move into more optimistic territory, it wasn’t enough for me. I found Henning Mankell’s The Italian Shoes to be a much more enjoyable book about a recluse in a beautiful setting (in this case a Swedish island) who begins to reach out to others.
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