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Fb2 Paper Cities: An Anthology of Urban Fantasy ePub

by Ekaterina Sedia

Category: Short Stories and Anthologies
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Ekaterina Sedia
ISBN: 0979624606
ISBN13: 978-0979624605
Language: English
Publisher: Senses Five Press; First Edition edition (April 1, 2008)
Pages: 271
Fb2 eBook: 1763 kb
ePub eBook: 1260 kb
Digital formats: lrf mbr mobi lrf

Paper Cities also made me rethink what I define Urban Fantasy as. In the past I would have said any story setĀ . Darin C. Bradley's They Would Only Be Roads combines a modern sense of Urban Fantasy with a good tech thriller aspect.

Paper Cities also made me rethink what I define Urban Fantasy as. In the past I would have said any story set in a modern city with traditional elements of fantasy whether it used magic, odd supernatural elements, fairies, or any other creatures of myth in some fashion. Jess Nevins's Foreword is a good start to expanding your world view of Urban Fantasy as he intimates any story set in a Metropolis whether they be cities at the dawn of time to Modern locales or into the very depths of sewers beneath them.

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Sedia, E. (Ekaterina). Anthologies (multiple authors), Science Fiction - Short Stories, Fiction, Science Fiction, Short Stories, Fiction, Fiction - Science Fiction, Science Fiction. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on June 4, 2013. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Ekaterina Sedia, New Jersey, August 30th 2007. If Paper Cities is any indication of second-generation Urban Fantasy - and I believe it is - both the mode of storytelling and the subgenre have a bright future. Jess Nevins Hunstville, Texas August, 2007. One of the appealing things about Urban Fantasy is that, as John Clute points out in the Encyclopedia of Fantasy, it is a mode of storytelling rather than a subgenre, and as such accommodates a variety of themes and approaches.

When I think of urban fantasy, I recall the novels published by MeganĀ .

When I think of urban fantasy, I recall the novels published by Megan Lindholm, Emma Bull, and Charles de Lint in the 1980s, which employed fantasy tropes in gritty urban settings, the emphasis on the contemporary. While Paper Cities brings together many excellent stories about cities and their inhabitants, in the end, I am not convinced that it brings us any closer to understanding what urban fantasy is all about.

This is the front cover art for the book Paper Cities: An Anthology of Urban Fantasy written by Ekaterina Sedia. Paper Cities: An Anthology of Urban Fantasy. The entire front cover. Because the image is a book cover, a form of product packaging, the entire image is needed to identify the product, properly convey the meaning and branding intended, and avoid tarnishing or misrepresenting the image

National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, .

Paper Cities: An Anthology of Urban Fantasy was first published in 2008 by Senses Five Press in trade paperback format

Paper Cities: An Anthology of Urban Fantasy was first published in 2008 by Senses Five Press in trade paperback format. It won the 2009 World Fantasy Award for best anthology. It features 21 stories by 21 authors. One of the stories featured in the anthology, Cat Sparks's "Sammarynda Deep", won the 2008 Aurealis Award for best fantasy short story.

This anthology of 21 original fantasy stories explores humanity’s most dynamic and forceful creation—the city. Featuring tales from fantasy heavyweights such as Hal Duncan, Catherynne M. Valente, Jay Lake, and Barth Anderson, the collection whisks readers from dizzying rooftop perches down to the underpasses, gutters, and the sinister secrets therein. Mutilated warrior women, dead boys, mechanical dogs, and escape artists are just some of the wonders and horrors explored in this bizarre assembly of works from voices new and old.

Comments to eBook Paper Cities: An Anthology of Urban Fantasy
Mash
Haven't gotten into it much; so far so good
Rollers from Abdun
Paper Cities had been sitting on my to read shelf staring at me forlornly for many months and since it was recently nominated as one of the Best Anthologies of the Year for the World Fantasy Award I thought it was high time I got to it. I always find anthologies to be a very mixed bag. I read them occasionally either because a couple of my favorite authors contribute or because I like the theme of the anthology as with Ann & Jeff VanderMeer's wonderful Steampunk also nominated this year. In general most anthologies don't have a consistent level of writing throughout, but Paper Cities goes against that theory. Nearly ever story was well done and those I didn't care for it wasn't from lack of talent but rather the aim of the story.

Paper Cities also made me rethink what I define Urban Fantasy as. In the past I would have said any story set in a modern city with traditional elements of fantasy whether it used magic, odd supernatural elements, fairies, or any other creatures of myth in some fashion. Jess Nevins's Foreword is a good start to expanding your world view of Urban Fantasy as he intimates any story set in a Metropolis whether they be cities at the dawn of time to Modern locales or into the very depths of sewers beneath them.

Instead of discussing each story I'll just point out some stand-outs for me.

Hal Duncan's The Tower of Morning Bones is the author's attempt at writing a story around the world's first city. It is amazingly lyrical and almost poetic in its style. Duncan's short stories never disappoint.

Richard Parks' Courting the Lady Scythe is one of the most unexpected stories in the bunch about a man in love with an Executioner. He stirred odd emotions in me about what getting what you want could really mean. I also think Parks could do more with the mythology he setup.

Greg van Eekhout's Ghost Market was one of the shortest tales and also one of my favorites. It is the type of story you think is going one way when it veers into a different yet satisfying direction. The unusual aspect of the main character could easily be expanded into a longer form at some point, which I would happily dip into. It is so short if I mention much it would ruin the reveal.

Cat Sparks' Sammarynda Deep is a deeply endearing revenge story with an incredibly rich mythology for such a small number of pages. Sparks left me begging for further stories in this land with its magical pool. I hope she revisits it in the future. Sparks also won the Aurealis Award for best fantasy short story for this entry.

Mark Teppo's The One That Got Away is about the intersecting of fantasy with reality as a Unicorn is seen by some in a city park. The group goes on their own Wild Hunt to prove to themselves it is real. This story acts as a cautionary tale about following fairy tales.

Vylar Kaftan's Godivy was the strangest story in the bunch and it still has me perplexed, which means it left a lasting impression. A man in love with a copier at work is trying to fend off the advances from his boss, while also trying to get his morning coffee. Strange stuff, but oddly funny.

Darin C. Bradley's They Would Only Be Roads combines a modern sense of Urban Fantasy with a good tech thriller aspect. Bradley created a character with a lot of levels with amazing ease in a wonderfully paced fashion, but this did feel like an opening salvo to a much larger tale.

David Schwartz's The Sombnambulist is the best use of the sleepwalking warrior-slave idea I've read. He managed to fit in a lot of interesting vignettes ala Indiana Jones, which made it a lot of fun as well

Sedia did a wonderful job of setting the stories in a manner that led well from one style to next and I could feel her touch in many of the tales. I give Paper Cities 8 out of 10 Hats. Sedia is set to release her third anthology Running with the Pack in late 2010 and her fourth novel The House of Discarded Dreams in May 2010 both from Prime Books. Sedia had already become an author to watch, now she has become an Editor to trust. Paper Cities has a strong possibility of winning the World Fantasy Award even against some tough competition and I'm sure we'll be seeing many of these authors around for years to come.
Bloodhammer
I have a strong liking of fantastical stories set in cities, which made me very keen to read this anthology. I'm glad I managed to pick up an early copy of it.

It's very good.

The 21 cities are all different. They range in technology level from the medieval castle of Forrest Aguirre's "Andretto Walks the King's Way" (which is a darker, more peculiar piece than any other medieval fantasy I've read) to the cyberpunk city of Darin C. Bradley's "They Would Only Be Roads" (in which charms and rites are a hacker's tools).

Some stories could be set in our world, if things were a little different. Vylar Kaftan's "Godivy" is set in the familiar office landscape, except that "the administrators [are] mating with the photocopiers and producing children born for office work." In the wars over photocopiers, the office-men forget that their mates are more than objects. A brief, moralistic tale, well-handled, and delightfully quirky.

Other cities are not of our world. Stephanie Campisi's "The Title of This Story" sees Boy come to half-sunken Skendgrot to have a religious book named, in order that his people can discuss it and that it might become more powerful. The language is dead, and impossibly complex for onomastician Regent to decipher. Campisi gives her moulding city a presence within the story, almost as strong as Boy and Regent -- who consider the significance of naming, Boy of himself and Regent of the book. It's a full story (that's a good thing). And the linguistics details are fascinating.

Hal Duncan makes the city an object of death and rebirth in "The Tower of Morning's Bones," in which the bones of old go into the tower of morning, in the city at the end of time and life: "...a tower of all the bones of morning, falling always and forever into the glorious confusion of the world" is its finishing line, and is an apt descriptor of the story as a whole. Duncan does not write simply. But he does write well; he expects a lot of the reader, but gives to one who re-reads, re-examines. Heady stuff (with the double-meaning intended).

A particularly strange city is Catherynne M. Valente's "Palimpsest": a viral city, passed among lovers who, when they sleep, walk its streets. Newcomers are quartered: four of them, who came to the city at the same time, each told that "you will go nowhere, eat no capon or dormouse, drink no oversweet port that they do not also taste, and they will visit no whore that you do not also feel beneath you, and until that ink washes from your feet ... you cannot breathe but that they breathe also." Lucia, quartered, wanders Palimpsest while passing it onto others, until she meets in our world one of the women with whom she was quartered. This is a sensual, beautiful story. (And a novel, Palimpsest, is coming out in 2009; I can't wait to read it.)

An element of the strange runs through most of the stories in this anthology, particularly so in my favourites. Not every story worked for me, but that's the way with any anthology; I think there were only 2 (out of 21) that I disliked, while I immensely enjoyed many more. Other than the ones already mentioned, stories by Jay Lake (set in the same city as his excellent novel Trial of Flowers), Ben Peek, Cat Sparks, Mark Teppo and Anna Tambour were very, very good. What makes this anthology so strong is its variety. Variety in setting, topics, prose. Among the cities modern and old, familiar and strange, cities where it rains vinegar or where an escape artist captivates the population, a suburbia where toys are threats, underwater cities or a city on people's flesh, every reader is likely to find his or her own favourites. And with the overall quality high, readers of different tastes will not be disappointed.
Stonewing
Honestly, I picked this book up over a year ago in a bookstore in Newark Airport because I was browsing, and what I think of as the genre of "urban fantasy" (fantasy in modern city settings, like The Dresden Files or the Remy Chandler books) was just starting to interest me at that point. Then I saw the name of an author I was just becoming familiar with, Steve Berman, in the Table of Contents and figured, "what the heck."

Finally getting around to reading the book over the past few weeks, I realized that the anthology takes the broad view of "urban fantasy." If the story is fantastical in any sense, and takes place in any kind of city, it fits into the anthology. So you get stories in modern and semi-modern settings interspersed with stories in completely fictional fantasy worlds and stories that seem like they could take place in our own past.

Of the 21 stories in the book, I would say my favorites were "Palimpsest" by Catherynne M. Valente, "Andretto Walks the King's Way" by Forrest Aguirre, "Ghost Market" by Greg van Eekhout, "Sammarynda Deep" by Cat Sparks, "Promises" by Jay Lake , "Tearjerker" by Steve Berman, and "The One That Got Away" by Mark Teppo.
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