» » The Marble Quilt: Stories

Fb2 The Marble Quilt: Stories ePub

by David Leavitt

Category: Short Stories and Anthologies
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: David Leavitt
ISBN: 0395902444
ISBN13: 978-0395902448
Language: English
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; First Edition edition (September 21, 2001)
Pages: 241
Fb2 eBook: 1196 kb
ePub eBook: 1671 kb
Digital formats: azw mbr txt docx

Crossing St. Gotthard.

Crossing St. Irene remembered a ghost story she’d read as a girl-a man believed to be dead wakes in his coffin.

The marble quilt book. In these nine masterly stories, David Leavitt surveys the complicated politics of human relationships in families and communities, in the present day and over the course of the last century. A "wizard at blending levity and pathos" (Chicago Tribune), Leavitt displays here his characteristic grace and intelligence, as well as his remarkable candor and wit.

David Leavitt's extraordinary first novel, now reissued in paperback, is a seminal work about family, sexual identity .

David Leavitt's extraordinary first novel, now reissued in paperback, is a seminal work about family, sexual identity, home, and loss. His fourth story collection since he burst onto the scene at age twenty-three, The Marble Quilt shows Leavitt maturing into one of the most accomplished and agile writers of short fiction today.

In these nine masterly stories, David Leavitt surveys the complicated politics of human relationships in families and communities, in the present day and over the course of the last century. Here are stories that range in form from a historical survey to a police interrogation to an e-mail exchange

David Leavitt displays his masterful range, his deep emotional intelligence and wit in these nine stories, a. .

David Leavitt displays his masterful range, his deep emotional intelligence and wit in these nine stories, a cosmopolitan selection set variously over the past century, from fin de siècle London to early-60s Hollywood, from Florida to Rome. Fiction Short Stories. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

From soup to nuts was how she put it. And since you and Minna are the only ones of the brothers and sisters who are still alive, obviously it’s worth the trip to Florida to talk to yo. And since you and Minna are the only ones of the brothers and sisters who are still alive, obviously it’s worth the trip to Florida to talk to you. ant to see Minna, too, then?. Let me interview you first, Audrey said, and proposed that she come to tea at Rose’s house the following Tuesday. And you’ll spend the night, won’t you? Or a few nights. But no, Audrey said, she was going to stay with her boyfriend’s parents in Fort Lauderdale. Oh, and if you could have your birth certificate and.

He teaches at the University of Florida. Bloomsbury, 2003 (comprising the marble quilt, a place I’ve never been, and family dancing. Collected Stories is published by Bloomsbury. The collection also appeared in the UK, also from Bloomsbury, as The Stories of David Leavitt.

The marble quilt : stories. The marble quilt : stories. by. Leavitt, David, 1961-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

David Leavitt (/ˈlɛvɪt/; born June 23, 1961) is an American novelist, short story writer, and biographer. Leavitt was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to Harold and Gloria Leavitt

David Leavitt (/ˈlɛvɪt/; born June 23, 1961) is an American novelist, short story writer, and biographer. Leavitt was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to Harold and Gloria Leavitt. Harold was a professor who taught at Stanford University and Gloria was a political activist. Leavitt graduated Yale University with a . in English in 1983. After the success of Family Dancing, David spent much of the 1990s living in Italy working and restoring an old house in Tuscany with his partner.

The Marble Quilt: Stories. A gem of a book, illustrated delightfully and with short excerpts form the authors' favourite writers, inclding Mary McCarthy, .

In a collection of nine incisive short stories, the critically acclaimed author of Family Dancing explores the complexities of human relationships, past and present, in such works as "The Infection Scene," in which a young man's efforts to contract HIV is juxtaposed with a portrait of the early life of Lord Alfred Douglas. 25,000 first printing.
Comments to eBook The Marble Quilt: Stories
Urreur
I rush to read David Leavitt's fiction and non-fiction books as each is published, much the way a Stephen King or John Grisham fan might run to get their newest books. The nine stories contained in THE MARBLE QUILT contain some of the best, most exciting writing Leavitt has ever done. They are on a par with his best novels like THE LOST LANGUAGE OF CRANES and the stories in his masterly FAMILY DANCING.
The title story is one of Leavitt's strangest and most satisfying: in several brief episodes, an American is questioned by Italian police in the matter of his ex-lover's murder. The reader never gets a neat solution to who the murderer is nor why or when or how Tom was killed, but parts of his life, including his new hobby of stealing pieces of marble, reveal an anger and hostility toward the narrator/lover who obviously is more in control of his emotions, more rational, more able to live the life of an outsider.
In THE INFECTION SCENE Lord Alfred Douglas, before, during and after his affair with Oscar Wilde is contrasted, in alternating scenes, with a present day, young San Franciscan, who naively, dangerously believes that his love for a man infected with HIV, can only be tested and proven by becoming infected himself. I found Leavitt's footnotes charming and funny and (possibly) justifiably spiteful given the brouhaha surrounding, arguably, his best novel WHILE ENGLAND SLEEPS.
In, perhaps, the saddest of the stories, BLACK BOX, the grieving widower of a famous designer killed in an unexplained plane crash becomes involved emotionally, physically and intellectually with a stranger who, at every turn, presents surprise after horrible surprise, including a videotape of the dead designer waiting for his plane in the airport.
In these stories, Leavitt experiments with form and content; he brings humor to even the most gloomy of subjects and gives the reader great, great pleasure. These are brilliant stories which must be savored and re-read. HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.
Samulkree
David Leavitt is a gifted writer and storyteller, one of the best in his genre. This book of novellas/short stories/preNovels succeeds on all levels for this reader. Varied in content and style, these nine tales feel like a testing ground for works that may be brewing in Leavitt's fertile mind. Where is the new thread to be found in each of these stories? It seems that we are being introduced to the unspoken dialogue that holds the distance between apparently proximal characters, whether that proximity is a longstanding relationship being evaluated in retrospect, or a small cabin on a train holding related but highly disparate characters. Leavitt seems to be taking an observor's distance, analyzing why things aren't as they appear. Even relating history (Oscar Wilde's life as played out thorugh the adroitly drawn quasi-lover Bosie) or putting under the microscope the lives of a family of two women who were always thought to be sisters........, etc., or playing out the cruelty of gossip as filtered through the third person of email - each of these tales of misperception or variation of viewpoint are drawn with Leavitt's sharply polished skills with the English language. The author proves yet again that his imagination is alive and well and shows only positive signs of continuing to mature as a potent literary force. Well worth your reading time!
Nten
There is little here of the pinched discomfort of educated middle-class white folk painfully disengaged from their own lives that distinguished Leavitt's first and most insightful short story collection, FAMILY DANCING. But there is still evidence that Leavitt is a keen observer of human behavior and modern life. (Although he sometimes sets his stories in another time period, I find it easiest to surrender to the ones that are firmly set in the present--even if that "present" spans a couple of decades, as in the title story of this collection.) He continues to reference the detritus of modern life (Filofax datebooks, email, automatic pool cleaners), but he does this selectively and, unlike Bret Easton Ellis and others of their generation, he does not overwhelm his readers with brand names and expect us to understand the relative prestige of every product named. His focus is on the workings of the human heart and will, though the social context of his characters is never out of sight. For me, his approach to story telling falls somewhere between that of de Maupassant and Checkhov.
Leavitt experiments in post-modern story telling in "Route 80," a two-part self-reflexive story about a pair of lovers who have broken up; "Speonk," a story with three possible endings about a recently retired soap opera star's efforts to reach the small town of Speonk on eastern Long Island one night and the way his daytime drama personality does (or does not) draw reactions from the people he encounters on the way; and "The List," a modern epistolary story told entirely through the emails exchanged by gay academics, some of whom have never met.
By far the most post-modern story in this collection is "The Infection Scene," the story of two young gay men who make a pact to have unprotected sex so that the uninfected partner can share in his lover's impending doom from AIDS, interwoven with a fictionalized historical account of Alfred Lord Douglas's equally destructive relationship with Oscar Wilde. The contemporary story has the ghoulishness of an urban legend while the historical story seems too confident of its own grasp of the facts to be believable. The ultimate effect (which I suspect is intentional) is to leave the reader questioning the validity and plausibility of any story. As cynical as it may seem, stories, Leavitt seems to be saying, can ultimately do little more than amuse. They cannot teach anything, reveal anything, or guide us through life. You, gentle reader, are what you choose to believe.
This theme also dominates the best story in the collection, "Black Box." Here, using very traditional story-telling techniques, Leavitt chooses one metaphor (the search for fallen commercial jet's black box) to hover in the background of his story. Although certainly written before 9/11/01, it addresses the Grand Guignol aspects of human behavior that have come to the fore since the terrorist attacks of that tragic day. One senses that the lives of people caught up in the numbing banality of modern life are so devoid of meaning that there is an almost romantic surrendering to tragedy and horror. As one character observes, "It's curious how hungry, almost lustful, people get for details. Especially if there's some horrible irony, like the person had just missed another plane" (p. 101). The question seems to be, where do people turn to find meaning and from what do we manufacture it?
Overall, a decent and thoughtful collection of stories, though not as unified and stunning as FAMILY DANCING.
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