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Fb2 Camel Xiangzi (Bilingual Series on Modern Chinese Literature) ePub

by Lao She,Shi Xiaojing

Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Lao She,Shi Xiaojing
ISBN: 9629961970
ISBN13: 978-9629961978
Language: English
Publisher: The Chinese University Press; Bilingual edition (June 29, 2005)
Pages: 600
Fb2 eBook: 1278 kb
ePub eBook: 1424 kb
Digital formats: azw doc mobi lrf

Camel Xiangzi not only marks the peak of Lao She's career as a professional writer, but it also registers a new approach to the representation of China in its absurdist situation

Camel Xiangzi not only marks the peak of Lao She's career as a professional writer, but it also registers a new approach to the representation of China in its absurdist situation. The novel shows Lao She at his best the work of a mature writer, who excels in his mastery of narrative techniques, as well as his prophetic vision of the future of China. For this reason, it can be read as an "epic" of modern China. Renowned for his absurdist re-visioning of the world and experimentation with the techniques of humour in his satirical writings.

Lao Shê in Modern Chinese Writers, ed. by Helmut Martin and Jeffrey Kinkley, 1992. Camel Xiangzi (駱駝祥子 /Luo tuo Xiangzi) Translated by Xiaoqing Shi. Kwok-Kan Tam. "Introduction". 駱駝祥子 /Luo tuo Xiangzi) Translated by Jean James. Honolulu: University Press of Hawaii, 1979. Rickshaw Boy. (駱駝祥子 /Luo tuo Xiangzi) Translated by Evan King and Illustrated by Cyrus Leroy Baldridge. New York: Reynal & Hitchcock, 1945. Rickshaw Boy: A Novel.

Lao She. Camel Xiangzi. Bilingual Series on Modern Chinese Literature) by Lao She and Shi Xiangzi, (translator)

Lao She. Bilingual Series on Modern Chinese Literature) by Lao She and Shi Xiangzi, (translator). The Chinese University Press, 2005. "Lao Shê" in Modern Chinese Writers: Self-Portrayals, ed. by Helmut Martin and Jeffrey C. Kinkley, (Armonk, NY: .

Bilingual Series on Modern Chinese Literature. Chinese University Press. This classic of modern Chinese literature is the story of the life of Xiangzi, who comes to Beijing as a youth, hoping to make his fortune as a rickshaw boy. More universally, it is the story of a life of poverty and the difficulties of overcoming the hardships and inequities that afflict the poor in most societies. Xiangzi works hard and scrimps so that he can ultimately purchase his own rickshaw, rather than renting it. He is initially successful, but through a series of events loses that rickshaw.

used books, rare books and new books. Camel Xiangzi (Bilingual Series on Modern Chinese Literature): ISBN 9789629961978 (978-962-996-197-8) Softcover, The Chinese University Press, 2005. Camel Xiangzi (Phoenix Books). Find all books by 'Lao She' and compare prices Find signed collectible books by 'Lao She'. Find signed collectible books: 'Camel Xiangzi (Phoenix Books)'.

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Modern Chinese Literature in Translation Term: Spring Instructor: Zhang Jing Office hour: 1:30 pm -4:15 pm. .

THIS story is about Xiangzi, not about Camel, because "Camel" was only his nickname.

Lao She’s classic novel, better known as Rickshaw Boy, is set in 1920s China. The republic had been declared a decade ago and now the country is close to civil war. It is every man for himself and against this backdrop unfolds the story of a rickshaw-puller named Xiangzi who arrives in Beijing hoping to make his fortune but instead, meets a series of misfortunes.

Renowned for his absurdist re-visioning of the world and experimentation with the techniques of humour in his writings, Lao She has written about most major historical events in modern China. In Camel Xiangzi he reveals his prophetic vision of the future of China. The novel depicts the life of Xiangzi, a young rickshaw-puller in Beijing, who fails to improve his life no matter how hard he works. When innocent people's hopes are destroyed, they are awakened to the truth that they are but playthings of fate, which is a Chinese concept for the unnameable in life's absurdities. The novel demonstrates the techniques of bitter humour Lao She employs in his portrayal of characters, who are caught in the endless social turmoil in the 1930s. The novel's socio-historical dimensions have made it a widely used text for the cultural analysis of modern China.
Comments to eBook Camel Xiangzi (Bilingual Series on Modern Chinese Literature)
Samugor
The description of the book shows that the book was published at "Indiana Univ Pr; First Edition edition (February 1982)". However, the book we are allowed to "LOOK INSIDE" here at amazon is published at The Chinese University Press in 2005. So which book is it? The Chinese University Press book is in Chinese and English. Not sure if the the Indiana University Press edition is in Chinese or not. The edition a seller sent me from this page was published by the Foreign Language Press in Beijing. If anyone has a had cover edition from The Chinese University Press, please let me know. I don't want the paperback if I can get a used hard cover at a reasonable cost.

This is an excellent book and the rating is not a reflection of Lao She's masterpiece.
Virtual
A very excellent bilingual edition of a great, overlooked novel.
Honeirsil
(This book is also known as Rickshaw Boy and has had different translators. I read the version translated by Shi Xiaoqing and illustrated by Gu Bingxin that I bought in China. ISBN 7-119-00512)

This is the great classic novel of exploitation in Old China, before the 1949 Revolution. It's also anti-individualist. It's the early 1930s and Xiangzi arrives alone in Beiping (Beijing) with dreams of making a living as a rickshaw puller. He is a loner who constantly struggles against forces beyond his control. On more than one occasion his rickshaw is destroyed and each time he tries to bounce back. Class struggle is woven throughout the tapestry of this story.

I read this after Nawal El Saadawi's Woman at Point Zero. So what really caught my attention was the character, Joy, who enters in the last third of Camel Xiangzi. I decided to use both of these novels in my thesis on women forced into prostitution. Joy is sold to an army officer by her lazy greedy father. Joy learns that temporary "marriages" are the MO of her officer "husband." Each time he is transferred he just buys a new wife, because it's cheaper than hiring housekeepers and prostitutes, and he leaves them with the bills.

When Joy returns home she's damaged goods and her father forces her to prostitute in order to support his drinking habit and her two younger brothers. Her life becomes hell on earth. I don't really want to spoil the ending. Let me just say that Chinese novels rarely have happy endings.

In his 1954 afterword Lao She reflects back on how much China has evolved since those dark days and how "Today, nineteen years later, the working people have become masters of their own destiny." Tragically more than half a century later, while China has the fastest growing economy in the world, many of its citizens, especially girls, are much worse off. The great exploitation novel of 21st century China would be called Sweatshop Girl or Hostage Hooker. The protagonist would be a teenage girl from one of the inner provinces like Sichuan or Hunan. She would be forced to leave school and migrate to a city like Guangzhou. She would lie about her age to obtain a job in a sweatshop working around the clock, for pennies an hour, to support herself and send money home. Another worse, but unfortunately very common scenario (in Russia as well), she would be abducted walking home from school by a pimp from organized crime. When her parents try to find her the police sit back and do nothing because they are working with organized crime. A search engine turned up numerous articles about this. China is also the only country where more females than males commit suicide. Its one-child policy has led to a birth ratio of 119 males to 100 females. Rather than leading to a greater appreciation of women, who "hold up half of the sky," it has fueled a higher demand for trafficking in women.

I am reading Will the Boat Sink the Water: The Life of China's Peasants by Chen Guidi and Wu Chuntao. It was written in the last few years by a husband and wife who are journalists from Anhui Province. The suffering of China's billion peasants seems even worse than in Lao She's day. I also recommend The Garlic Ballads, a novel by Mo Yan.
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