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Fb2 The Floodmakers ePub

by Mylene Dressler

Category: Literary
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Mylene Dressler
ISBN: 039915163X
ISBN13: 978-0399151637
Language: English
Publisher: Putnam Adult; First Edition edition (March 30, 2004)
Pages: 192
Fb2 eBook: 1574 kb
ePub eBook: 1668 kb
Digital formats: mobi lrf mobi lrf

The Floodmakers book.

The Floodmakers book. Harry Buelle awakes confused one morning in his bathtub  . Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Harry Buelle awakes confused one morning in his bathtub. With his family in turmoil and his own life in a shambles, Harry Buelle agrees to join his parents, his sister, and her husband at their Southern beach house retreat, only to find that having the whole family together under one roof gives rise to old tensions, battles, disappointments, hurt, and bitter secrets.

Mylene Dressler was born in the Hague, Netherlands, and has lived in Europe, the United States, and Latin America. The author of the critically acclaimed The Medusa Tree, she now lives in Houston, where she is at work on her next book. Библиографические данные.

by. Dressler, Mylène, 1963-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Dramatists, Documentary films, Parent and adult child, Brothers and sisters, Seaside resorts. Uploaded by MerciG on December 2, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

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Mylène Dressler's third novel (after THE MEDUSA TREE and THE DEADWOOD BEETLE) is a departure book. Unlike her first two, THE FLOODMAKERS is less concerned with the lyricism of introspection than with the dynamics of character and dialogue, and how they reveal the innermost workings of a family. Narrator Harry Buelle, a gay playwright who seems destined to live in the shadow of his famous playwright father, arrives at the family's Texas beach house at the request of his stepmother, Jean.

Third novel from Dressler (The Deadwood Beetle, 2001, et., a portrait of domestic angst set in a Texas beach ., a portrait of domestic angst set in a Texas beach house during a family reunion.

Failure" may be too harsh of a word to describe Mylene Dressler’s The Floodmakers, but literary achievement in the area of the family drama certainly doesn’t fit the bill, either. Spanning a weekend, the story revolves around Harry Buelle, the narrator, and his family consisting of father, step-mother, sister, and brother-in-law. Whether he’s mildly retarded or autistic is never known because all the author reveals is that the rest of the family reacts to him with some distance, treating him as if he were a puppy or an over-excited child they have no choice but to deal with. Why does the family resent his marriage to Sarah?

With his family in turmoil and his own life in a shambles, Harry Buelle agrees to join his parents, his sister, and her husband at their Southern beach house retreat, only to find that having the whole family together under one roof gives rise to old tensions, battles, disappointments, hurt, and bitter secrets. By the author of The Deadwood Beetle.
Comments to eBook The Floodmakers
Kage
THEN THE BUELLES ARE ENJOYING A GOOD LONG RUN.
The Floodmakers is essentially a one-act play, dramatized on the stage of a cramped, damp and gritty beach house. The scene is intense and claustrophobic. Movements are repressed and there's a whole ocean of other meanng underneath the dialogue. It's like a Mike Leigh film. Dressler has brought together her characters and lets them loose to improvise their own lines. It's fascinating and often surprising to "watch."
This slice of life novel allows us a peak into the lives of these complex characters, giving us just enough history to create our own stories for them before and after this scene.
A deceptively simple novel which packs a whallop!
Atineda
Did not make sense. Unable to follow. Did not like or understand this book. The older couple were blood related versus parents of Sarah and Harry? Didn't understand.
Iseared
Summoned back to the beach house on the Texas Gulf Coast where his family lived and vacationed many years ago, Harry Buelle, a struggling, experimental playwright, is forced to confront his parents' aging, their declining health, and the barely hidden resentments he and his sister have borne against their demanding father for most of their lives. Dee Buelle, the father, a highly successful playwright with an unbroken string of hits, was both physically and emotionally absent when the children were small, and is now a querulous and impatient man with major health problems, for which he is refusing his medication. Sarah Buelle, Harry's sister, is a cinematographer filming an interview with her father, its purpose and agenda unclear at the start of the reunion.
In the tradition of the theater which dominates the lives of father and son, the author reveals most of the information about family dynamics through dialogue. Instead of setting and describing scenes, Dressler brings the characters together and then lets them goad each other and bicker, creating clear, sharp moments of high tension as the children confront their parents and the reality of their family life. Each person's reminiscences develop the family's collective history for the reader and reveal relationships, past and present. The children's love and admiration for Jean, their stepmother, sets their problems with their father into sharp relief, while some ironically humorous scenes allow the author to control the pace and mood. Despite the burdens placed upon it, the dialogue moves along smartly and sets a natural, conversational tone.

Dressler incorporates a sometimes overwhelming amount of symbolism in this short novel as she subordinates description and plot to the themes: The stormy winter setting at the beach parallels the cold, often stormy family dynamics. Though the beach house has been built on stilts, Harry pointedly notes that the house shakes in storms. A booby bird, being cared for in the house, remains oblivious to the two resident hunting dogs. Firmly rooted in the Southern Gothic tradition, the novel is filled with dark surprises, the most devastating of which come at the conclusion and are used in an effort to resolve the action. Since this grand finale contributes little to the understanding of the characters, some readers may feel a bit betrayed by the last-minute introduction of two dramatic new elements which further complicate, rather than simplify the lives of Harry and his sister Sarah. Mary Whipple
Framokay
Mylène Dressler's third novel (after THE MEDUSA TREE and THE DEADWOOD BEETLE) is a departure book. Unlike her first two, THE FLOODMAKERS is less concerned with the lyricism of introspection than with the dynamics of character and dialogue, and how they reveal the innermost workings of a family. Narrator Harry Buelle, a gay playwright who seems destined to live in the shadow of his famous playwright father, arrives at the family's Texas beach house at the request of his stepmother, Jean. His father Dee is suffering from heart failure, and has decided to halt all medication in a calculated move to clear his mind and face his imminent death. Rebellious sister Sarah and her wide-eyed Slavic husband Paul are also invited. There, hovering around a rescued brown booby with a broken foot and colliding with one another, the Buelle family and their darkest, most defining moments are revealed.
After a somewhat confusing start, this novel gets stronger with every page. The narrative, which is meant to have the feel of a play, reads like a cross between Tennessee Williams and Neil Simon, with melodrama and comedy mixed with a deeper sense of loss. Certain moments happen "off-stage" (as when Jean disappears into the bathroom and the reader "hears" an unexplained ruckus within) while others seem carefully orchestrated to show the awkward relationships this family fosters. Even the dialogue comes across as written for the stage. While the author's adherence to the idea of novel as play occasionally can be distancing, Dressler brings the reader closer through the use of Harry's first-person narration and flashbacks. The true nature of this creative, dysfunctional family is exposed through their interactions, and that, more than anything, is the strength of this novel.
Dressler fans will certainly want to read her latest, as will readers intrigued by the exploration of family dynamics. Readers of literary fiction who like character-driven novels and a gentle mix of humor and drama will also find much to admire.
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