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Fb2 Cassandra: A Novel and four Essays (English and German Edition) ePub

by Jan Van Heurck,Christa Wolf

Category: Literary
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Jan Van Heurck,Christa Wolf
ISBN: 0374119562
ISBN13: 978-0374119560
Language: English German
Publisher: Farrar Straus & Giroux; First Printing edition (May 1, 1984)
Pages: 305
Fb2 eBook: 1801 kb
ePub eBook: 1867 kb
Digital formats: mbr rtf txt docx

In 1980 East German author Christa Wolf took a trip to Greece accompanied by her husband, Gerhard. In 1982 she was awarded a guest lectureship at the University of Frankfurt, where in May she delivered a series of five "Lectures on Poetics" relating to her Greek travels and studies.

In 1980 East German author Christa Wolf took a trip to Greece accompanied by her husband, Gerhard. The fifth "lecture" was ad raft of the novel Cassandra, which she then revised and expanded for publication.

Christa Wolf, Jan van Heurck (Translator). The book ended with four literary essays written by Wolf. I’m interested in inspiration and how people get their ideas, especially their writing ideas. Cassandra: A Novel and Four Essays had such an impact on me when I read it earlier this year that I have re-read it and taken copious notes. It’s one of the most powerful books I’ve read.

Wolf, Christa; Wolf, Christa. Voraussetzungen einer Erzählung. Cassandra - Conditions of a narrative : Cassandra. The four accompanying pieces describe the novel's genesis. 1. Travel report, about the accidental surfacing and gradual fabrication of a literary personage ; 2. The travel report continues, and the trail is followed ; 3. A work diary, about the stuff life and dreams are made of ; 4. A letter, about unequivocal and ambiguous meaning, definiteness and indefiniteness; about ancient conditions and new view-scopes; about objectivity. Novel retells the story of the fall of Troy from Cassandra's point of view.

A Novel and Four Essays. Christa Wolf; Translated by Jan Van Heurck In 1980 East German author Christa Wolf took a trip to Greece accompanied by her husband, Gerhard. Christa Wolf; Translated by Jan Van Heurck. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. In this volume, the distinguished East German writer Christa Wolf retells the story of the fall of Troy, but from the point of view of the woman whose visionary powers earned her contempt and scorn. In 1980 East German author Christa Wolf took a trip to Greece accompanied by her husband, Gerhard.

Cassandra (German: Kassandra) is a 1983 novel by the East German author Christa Wolf. Swiss composer Michael Jarrell has adapted the novel for speaker and instrumental ensemble, and his piece has been performed frequently.

German author Christa Wolf retells the story of the Trojan War from Cassandra's point of view in her novel . Yeah, I read this book both in German and in translation. This is no exception.

German author Christa Wolf retells the story of the Trojan War from Cassandra's point of view in her novel Cassandra translated from the German by Jan Van Heurck. By telling the story from this way, Ms. Wolf increases our understanding of the Trojan War. There are no heroics in Cassandra.

Christa Wolf, Cassandra. A Novel and Four Essays, tr. Jan van Heurck (New York and London: Farrar Straus Giroux and Virago, 1984) (further references in the text). Special Section: Barbara Einhorn Introduces Christa Wolf.

Christa Wolf, Jan Van Heurck, Van. In this volume, the distinguished East German writer Christa Wolf retells the story of the fall of Troy, but from the point of view of the woman whose visionary powers earned her contempt and scorn

Christa Wolf, Jan Van Heurck, Van. Written as a result of the author's Greek travels and studies, Cassandra speaks to us in a pressing monologue whose inner focal points are patriarchy and war. In the four accompanying pieces, which take the form of travel reports, journal entries, and a letter, Wolf describes the novel's genesis

Christa Wolf Cassandra: A Novel & Four Essays. A Novel and Four Essays, Translated from German by Jan Van Heurck, Ferrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, NY, 1984, p. 6). garadinervi.

Christa Wolf Cassandra: A Novel & Four Essays. Christa Wolf, Cassandra: A Novel and Four Essays.

Christa Wolf, Jan Van Heurck. In the tradition of such masterpieces of historical fiction as Mary Renault's "The King Must Die" East German writer Christa Wolf movingly retells the story of the fall of Troy - but from the point of view of the woman whose visionary powers earned her contempt and scorn

A recreation of the myth of Cassandra, journeying to her foreseen death and reflecting on her own history, is accompanied by essays that touch on such diverse issues as nuclear war and the role of women, linking them to the interpretation of Cassandra
Comments to eBook Cassandra: A Novel and four Essays (English and German Edition)
Adrielmeena
Christa Wolf was one of the two finest writers in the German language to emerge following World War II, the other being Ingeborg Bachmann, whom Wolf discusses extensively and cogently in one of the four accompanying essays. The first part of the book, the novel itself written in first person from the point of view of Cassandra, is utterly enthralling. It is one of those books in which every paragraph contains a sentence or an expression or an idea so startling that one feels the need to stop and think about it before one continues reading. Wolf succeeds brilliantly in getting inside Casandra, her feelings, thinking, loves, hates and desires. And the character of Cassandra, in turn, succeeds brilliantly in getting inside the other players in the Trojan War saga, both the Greeks and the Trojans. The accompanying essays are no less fascinating. Yes, this is a profound and lasting piece of feminist writing. But it is so, so much more. Wolf's admirable and ground-breaking feminism is only one aspect of her overall view of history and the human species' place in it. To sum up: this is a work of genius by a genius. I give it my highest recommendation, and am certain that I will read it again.
RuTGamer
This is an astounding novel. Told from Cassandra's point of view, as she awaits her end at Mycenae, the recount of the war at Troy from one who wasn't listened to offers tremendous insight into any war, at any time, in any place. It's about the mythologising of myth, really; the spin, the suppression of truth, the misuse of language, the subversion of the normal, the rejection of good sense, to bring about a state of war that will satisfy the perverse egos of a particular type of back-room intriguer with limited talents and too much influence. It's handy to have some knowledge of 'The Iliad' and Greek mythology (or to have a copy of 'Who's Who in Greek Mythology' close by) because sometimes you need reminding about who everyone is among the large cast of characters. Despite this description, which sounds a bit heavy, it's a very readable book in an excellent translation. Cassandra is not the moaning Minnie she's often depicted as, but a character of depth, interest, sly observations, and even humour of a bleak kind. The language is wonderful, too. In fact, this novel has everything going for it. And into the bargain, it's not very long. Plus, it comes with some (probably) very insightful notes and lectures by the author at the end (which I haven't read, but you don't really need to, although they're most likely very edifying).
DART-SKRIMER
I remember an old girlfriend of mine. No way she could show some interest or appreciation for books I read, ever. Well, to my greatest satisfaction, when she grabbed this book from my library -- that was when she found me reading it for the third time -- and finished it, she was almost unable to speak and could only utter: terrific.
Akisame
The Kindle version is in Italian, not English
Onoxyleili
Love reading about my NAME.
Tar
I haven't much to add to previous reviews except a personal response to the text. Yet another tough book to comment on due to its translated form, Christa Wolf attempts to rewrite a myth from a female perspective and turn the Iliad on its head. The first person stream of consciousness is like a cloud that passes over that period in history, soaking up the facts we know and sprinkling them back down on us in digest form. Cassandra is not so much concerned with its own myth as picking and choosing focal points ripe for re-focusing from a modern feminist perspective (sexuality, the male heroes and their brutality, the reality of war, the mind-control of politics). Although Interesting, and possibly even poetic in its native tongue, Cassandra is more curious as an academic project than a piece of literature.
Kulalbine
"Cassandra" does not read like a novel. Rather, one feels as though one is a member of the jury set to judge the entire life of one woman when the sentance (death) has already been decided. Christa Wolf doesn't retell the fall of Troy from the perspective of a female narrator. Instead, she invites the reader into the mindset of a woman in a society that is losing itself to war and to the male realm. Wolf's Cassandra is a starkly lonely figure, suffering from her isolation even before the seige of Troy begins. Bringing in a number of feminist themes to her rendition of the classic Greek tale, she weaves beautiful prose to give perspective to Cassandra's last hours.

In the traditional myth the prophetess Cassandra predicts that Troy will fall to the Greeks but no one believes her, and she is ultimately shunned in the end when her prophecy holds true. Wolf entraps the reader in Cassandra's mind, which often teeters on the brink of madness for reasons that lay largely unexplained. I felt intimately connected to the narrator at the end but largely disatisfied. There are really no other characters in the novel - merely shadows of other relationships that are never given life in and of themselves. Wolf's writing is exquisite, but I often felt more like someone sneaking a read at a forbidden diary, where I felt at the mercy of the revelations the writer felt like making. Allusions are made to friendships, loves, passions, childhood memories, but are not made explicit enough to resonate. Despite the well-crafted passages, I gave the novel 3 stars for this reason; it simply wasn't enough. I reccomend it as an interesting glimpse into the mind of a woman immobilized by her empowerment in an increasingly masculinized age (even though the strength of this perspective has lessoned some since the novel was written on the heels of the 2nd wave of the feminist movement) At times Cassandra's self-fixation became almost too much to bear, but Wolf's excellent writing carried me through until the end.
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