» » The Lady and Her Monsters: A Tale of Dissections, Real-Life Dr. Frankensteins, and the Creation of Mary Shelley's Masterpiece

Fb2 The Lady and Her Monsters: A Tale of Dissections, Real-Life Dr. Frankensteins, and the Creation of Mary Shelley's Masterpiece ePub

by Roseanne Montillo

Category: History and Criticism
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Roseanne Montillo
ISBN: 006202583X
ISBN13: 978-0062025838
Language: English
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks; Reissue edition (October 22, 2013)
Pages: 336
Fb2 eBook: 1484 kb
ePub eBook: 1787 kb
Digital formats: azw lit txt lrf

Mary's creation of her masterpiece "Frankenstein" is discussed in some detail, but not the real legacy and .

Mary's creation of her masterpiece "Frankenstein" is discussed in some detail, but not the real legacy and impact she made for women in literary circles. Some still believe her husband to be the author because they don't want to have to admit a woman capable of such insight during that period. However, I didn't finish this novel without learning quite a bit. I had no idea the history of anatomist's dissections or the grave-robbing culture that blossomed from the demand for bodies.

The Hooblers' The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein comes immediately to mind, but there are several other worthy treatments

The Hooblers' The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein comes immediately to mind, but there are several other worthy treatments. This may sound odd, but I'm trying to work out why I enjoyed this as much as I did. Those interested in Mary Shelley and the writing of Frankenstein would be better served looking elsewhere.

Электронная книга "The Lady and Her Monsters: A Tale of Dissections, Real-Life Dr. Frankensteins, and the Creation of Mary Shelley's Masterpiece", Roseanne Montillo. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Lady and Her Monsters: A Tale of Dissections, Real-Life Dr. Frankensteins, and the Creation of Mary Shelley's Masterpiece" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Author: by Roseanne Montillo. Title: The Lady and Her Monsters: A Tale of Dissections, Real-Life Dr. Frankensteins, and the Creation of Mary Shelley's Masterpiece.

I found this interesting, but the writing style was kind of boring to me. Also, the author would go off on tangents. Not as interesting as I thought it would be. I had been wanting to read it, so I am glad I did. I can remove it from the list. Пользовательский отзыв - la2bkk - LibraryThing. I read this work with no expectations and was very pleasantly surprised.

The truly electric story of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, this book-printed .

The truly electric story of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, this book-printed with special ink-literally glows in the dark. s of the greatest horror story of all time-Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Exploring the frightful milieu in which Frankenstein was written, Roseanne Montillo, an exciting new literary talent, recounts how Shelley's Victor Frankenstein mirrored actual scientists of the period.

The story of Mary Shelley's life is brilliant and bizarre, and her studies of the more grotesque pursuits of surgeons and anatomists deliciously macabre. The Lady and Her Monsters. Saved from barnesandnoble. The Lady and Her Monsters: A Tale of Dissections, Real-Life Dr. Frankensteins, and the Creation of Mary Shelley's MasterpieceNOOK Book. The NOOK Book (eBook) of the The Lady and Her Monsters: A Tale of Dissections, Real-Life Dr. Women In History Mary Shelley Victor Frankenstein Gothic Books Literary Fiction.

The Lady and Her Monsters by Roseanne Motillo brings to life the fascinating times, startling science, and real-life horrors behind Mary Shelley's gothic masterpiece, Frankenstein. obsessed with the inner workings of the human body and how it might be reanimated after death.

The narrative of Mary Shelley’s fascinating life interwoven with stories of history’s .

The narrative of Mary Shelley’s fascinating life interwoven with stories of history’s real-life Doctor Frankensteins. Perfect for history nerds and book buffs alike. MON Motillo brings to life the fascinating times, startling science, and real-life horrors behind Mary Shelley's Gothic masterpiece, Frankenstein. The Lady and Her Monsters By Roseanne Montillo. Stop by the Reference Desk for a copy of the book today!

The Lady and Her Monsters by Roseanne Motillo brings to life the fascinating times, startling science, and real-life horrors behind Mary Shelley’s gothic masterpiece, Frankenstein.

Montillo recounts how—at the intersection of the Romantic Age and the Industrial Revolution—Shelley’s Victor Frankenstein was inspired by actual scientists of the period: curious and daring iconoclasts who were obsessed with the inner workings of the human body and how it might be reanimated after death.

With true-life tales of grave robbers, ghoulish experiments, and the ultimate in macabre research—human reanimation—The Lady and Her Monsters is a brilliant exploration of the creation of Frankenstein, Mary Shelley’s horror classic.

Comments to eBook The Lady and Her Monsters: A Tale of Dissections, Real-Life Dr. Frankensteins, and the Creation of Mary Shelley's Masterpiece
September
Roseanne Montillo has written another interesting biography that provides insight into the short tragic life of Mary Shelley. While not quite as good as her work about Jesse Pomeroy (believed to be America's youngest serial killer), the tale is sad and full of unfulfilled dreams in its attempt to capture the feel of the period and the potential for greatness never fully recognized, not only in Mary but also her husband and their friends like Lord Byron. Mary's creation of her masterpiece "Frankenstein" is discussed in some detail, but not the real legacy and impact she made for women in literary circles. Some still believe her husband to be the author because they don't want to have to admit a woman capable of such insight during that period. If possible I would actually have given the book four and a half stars instead of just four. I recommend it highly.
furious ox
Having recently read the original Frankenstein, I was interested in learning more of the historical background of the book. This book gave both the scientific history of au courant experiments with electricity and anatomy which so interested both Mary Shelley's father and husband and the literary background that surrounded her--father, William Godwin; mother, Mary Wollstonecraft; husband, Percy Bysshe Shelley; and friend, Lord Byron; as well as the public sentiment in regards to all these things. I am glad I read the book.
Lilegha
This is a fascinating read for anyone with an interest in history, medicine, poetry, or literature. The lady and her monsters provides an insightful glimpse into the world of Mary Shelly. The story flows brilliantly, such that I could not put the book down until I had finished reading it in less than two days. The bits of history consumed are sure to provide countless subjects for conversation with friends, as well as contribute material for my own 'waking dreams.'
Deodorant for your language
An interesting historical read that immerses you in the world of scientific research at the time the Shelleys and their contemporaries were writing.
Ynap
Ever since I read the original novel by Mary Shelley years ago, I have often wondered why the movie versions of Frankenstein were always such pitiful presentations and did not present the "monster" the same way he was portrayed in the book that supposedly spawned the Hollywood version(s). Hollywood, as usual, rewrote everything according to whatever they thought would sell most; and would encourage the most inhumane treatment of anyone who was different from average. Perhaps not one of them ever read the entire novel. But, a lot has changed over time. I personally thought they would do better by presenting the creature as he was presented in the book.

Poor Mary Shelley. She herself was not treated very well by the society in which she lived or by her own family. I am not much of a historian; so this book taught me a lot about the time during which she lived. She experienced the terrible instant global climate changes that occurred in 1815-1816 that brought such suffering to people of the time. It was during a part of history when for some odd reason, women were considered brainless and incapable of accomplishing much. I think she accomplished a lot under difficult circumstances.

Roseanne Monttillo wrote the perfect book for me; enough history to present the background of the period that produced Ms. Shelley without being so detailed as to become dry and uninteresting.
Tygralbine
(This was originally posted on GoodReads. I have slightly edited my review to better suit Amazon reviewing.)

This was a very scattered book. An interesting one, sure, and a well-researched one, but not very focused. It bit off much more than it needed to chew. The root of the book is the study of Mary Shelley and her motivations when writing "Frankenstein," but I don't think this book pulled many conclusions that a second-year literature student could not do with a few primary sources and a good Norton edition of the book.

The narrative follows two paths--a scientific one and a personal one. The science revolves around the historical interest in bringing dead bodies back to live through galvanism (a word which I have often used but did not know the roots of until this book). This is the section that held less interest for me, only because I didn't find it very shocking. It is a natural human instinct to be curious, and I understand if that curiosity extends to our bodies after death. I feel like Montillo wanted us to think the men of science like Galvini and Davy were somehow dark and sinister for their work, which I think is unfair. They had a lot of failures, but they were also pioneers. Would we fault a medical examiner or funeral director for keeping an emotional distance from their work today? Probably not, so I would extend the same line of thinking to the men who cut up bodies to see what was inside.

However, I didn't finish this novel without learning quite a bit. I had no idea the history of anatomist's dissections or the grave-robbing culture that blossomed from the demand for bodies. I especially liked the part about Burke & Hare and how they tried to profit off bringing (very fresh) bodies to medical researchers for cash. As a true crime fan, I was interested in the aspect of grave-robbing and body dissection that is not a victimless crime. Unfortunately, this is all supposed to be tied back to "Frankenstein," which I wasn't really buying. I never found lack of respect towards human remains to be the prevailing theme of the novel--an important one, yes, but not the main one of the narrative.

The personal aspect of the narrative was about author Mary Shelley. It wouldn't be a reach to say this really was two different books--Shelley herself never really crossed paths with the science aspect of bringing a body back to life besides hearing secondhand accounts from her husband or father. To claim she got her idea mainly from this scientific trend diminishes what is obviously a troubled and creative mind--of course she got ideas from the world around her, but in the end, she was an author of fiction, which requires an imagination.

I've always been drawn to the Romantic writers in the same way I'm drawn to Sylvia Plath and Death Cab for Cutie--they're all touted as morbid and "emo," but they're still endlessly fascinating. They were also all utterly intolerable in their pretentiousness. You almost need a sense of humor when you read about them--how couldn't have Shelley with her tragic past not written a novel like "Frankenstein?" There are a lot of intersections between the sort of "melancholy" Shelley was known to have and modern conditions like anxiety, depression, and bipolar disorder that are treated in a much more serious matter. It also isn't a stretch to think that the theme of "man as god" was glossed over for so long in the book because it was written by a teenage girl, not a well-established man of letters. I appreciated the parts of the book that highlighted how unfairly Shelley was treated. She deserves this kind of study and recognition, scattered as it may be.

I think modern readers will be a little bored by this book. We're sympathetic to both female writers of the past and the early scientific community. We tend to have a more nuanced view on what constitutes body and soul and how those are tied together. This is a clumsy narrative with some decent info sprinkled throughout, and the writing itself was solid, but it just made me want to read different, more focused bios on Mary Shelley and her work.
Zuser
Good reference text/companion to Frankensteins. My HS were engaged with the content. Good narrative voice.
Related to The Lady and Her Monsters: A Tale of Dissections, Real-Life Dr. Frankensteins, and the Creation of Mary Shelley's Masterpiece
Frankenstein (BBC Dramatization) eBook
Fb2 Frankenstein (BBC Dramatization) ePub
Frankenstein eBook
Fb2 Frankenstein ePub
Frankenstein eBook
Fb2 Frankenstein ePub
Frankenstein: The Lynd Ward Illustrated Edition eBook
Fb2 Frankenstein: The Lynd Ward Illustrated Edition ePub
Frankenstein (Running Press classics) eBook
Fb2 Frankenstein (Running Press classics) ePub
Frankenstein Or, the Modern Prometheus eBook
Fb2 Frankenstein Or, the Modern Prometheus ePub
Frankenstein (Classic Collection Brilliance Audio on MP3-CD) eBook
Fb2 Frankenstein (Classic Collection Brilliance Audio on MP3-CD) ePub
The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein eBook
Fb2 The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein ePub
Mary Shelley (British Library Writers' Lives Series) eBook
Fb2 Mary Shelley (British Library Writers' Lives Series) ePub