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Fb2 As I Was Saying: A Chesterton Reader ePub

by G. K. Chesterton,Robert Knille

Category: History and Criticism
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: G. K. Chesterton,Robert Knille
ISBN: 080283597X
ISBN13: 978-0802835970
Language: English
Publisher: W.B. Eerdmans Publishing Company; 1st edition (1985)
Pages: 314
Fb2 eBook: 1534 kb
ePub eBook: 1734 kb
Digital formats: azw doc mbr lit

The problem for those in the second group compiling bits of Chestertonia for novices in the first group is to know how to group them. But even those with well- thumbed GK books lining the library shelves will find this volume a valuable guide to finding (again) that zinger that lies buried in the stacks somewhere (who knows where), and which converted the reader, a former member of the first group, to a true believer. 12 people found this helpful.

Chesterton, G. K. (Gilbert Keith), 1874-1936; Knille, Robert. Lines to a friend apprehensive of a shortage of food in Beaconsfield" ; ". Chesterton" - Religion, morality, theology, heresy: Essay excerpts ; "The outline of liberty" ; " The new case of Catholic schools" ; "Babies and distributism" ; " On man : heir of all the ages" - "If I had only one sermon to preach" - The Father Brown stories: The origin of Father.

As I Was Saying book. ROBERT KNILLE was a lifelong Chesterton enthusiast. George Bernard Shaw called him a colossal genius. About ten years ago he founded the first eastern chapter of the Chesterton Society, and he remained its chairman until shortly before his death in 1983. Knille authored numerous articles on religion and literature as well as a bibliography of . publications about Chesterton.

Robert Knille was an executive from Eastman Kodak in Rochester, New York, but in his spare time, he was Geir .

Robert Knille was an executive from Eastman Kodak in Rochester, New York, but in his spare time, he was Geir Hasnes before there was a Geir Hasnes. He was an passionate collector of Chesterton material who put together a bibliography that had never been done before: all of Chesterton writings in American publications. To that end, his greatest accomplishment was creating the book As I Was Saying – A Chesterton Reader, which was first published in 1984. Although most of the material in the book is previously collected, Knille threw in a sprinkle of quotes and excerpts, long hidden, that appear here for the first time in book form.

ROBERT KNILLE was a lifelong Chesterton enthusiast.

We wish you'd get rid of what you've got here, sir," he observed, digging doggedly. Shrubs " said the Squire, laughing.

How is this book unique? Font adjustments & biography included Unabridged (100% Original content) Illustrated About The Napoleon Of Notting Hill by G. Chesterton The Napoleon of Notting Hill is a novel written by G. Chesterton in 1904, set in a nearly unchanged London in 1984. We wish you'd get rid of what you've got here, sir," he observed, digging doggedly. Nothing'll grow right with them here. You don't call the peacock trees shrubs, do you? Fine tall trees - you ought to be proud of them.

I discovered Chesterton about fifteen years ago and I have been continuing to discover him ever since. One can never get enough of this great man. Claimed by both liberals and conservatives, he defies modern categories just as he defies modern thought

I discovered Chesterton about fifteen years ago and I have been continuing to discover him ever since. Claimed by both liberals and conservatives, he defies modern categories just as he defies modern thought. Along with C. S. Lewis and J. R. Tolkien, G. C. is a pillar of wonder and joy in an age of sarcasm and despair.

As I Was Saying: A Book of Essays. G. Chesterton's stories can be divided into the secular and the religious, but both have several features in common

As I Was Saying: A Book of Essays. Chesterton's stories can be divided into the secular and the religious, but both have several features in common. Both kinds have strong elements of extravagance and fantastic high spirits, tempered by sharp and sudden doses of common sense. He is always aiming to make the familiar appear in its pristine strangeness, to peel away the coarsening layers of habit, so that a weed or a London street or a suburban family may appear romantic and glorious.

K. Chesterton, Robert Knille, G. Chesterton. Chesterton and the Edwardian cultural crisis. Library availability.

Book by Knille, Robert (Editor)
Comments to eBook As I Was Saying: A Chesterton Reader
Phenade
I discovered Chesterton about fifteen years ago and I have been continuing to discover him ever since. One can never get enough of this great man. Claimed by both liberals and conservatives, he defies modern categories just as he defies modern thought.
Along with C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien, G. K. C. is a pillar of wonder and joy in an age of sarcasm and despair. A devout Christian, his generous thought is characterised by humility, humor and a sharp brilliance that both awakens and renews the mind.
This volume is a wonderful summary of Chesterton's vast library of work. I challenge anyone with a real interest in truth to read a selection from this book and not want to read more. One of the great things about Chesterton is that he wrote about everything and wrote well. His thinking is original and fresh, but also ancient and deep as the deepest streams of philosophy.
If you can read just one book by Chesterton (yes, I said it) read this one. This is the cheepest way to buy a Chesterton library. You will never be the same.
Enjoy!
Cordanara
There are two kinds of people, runs the old joke: those who divide everyone into two kinds of people, and those who don't. Belonging firmly to the first group, as regards the subject at hand, I hold that there are two kinds of people: those who have never read Chesterton, and those who want everyone else to. The problem for the first group is where to start. The problem for the second group is how to get them started. This book, I humbly suggest, meets both needs.

As usual, Regent has gone all out to produce a beautiful edition of a classic book, earning them high points on my list of best publishers. This one was originally a hardback from Eerdmans, published in 1985. There have been other Chesterton readers, so how does this one, edited by Robert Knille, the late avid fan and founder of the first eastern chapter of the Chesterton Society, hold up? Quite well on a few counts.

The problem for those in the second group compiling bits of Chestertonia for novices in the first group is to know how to group them. GKC wrote across the board; nearly everything piqued his interest, and nearly all he wrote displayed his sparkling wit, whimsy, and insight. Nearly all of it also contained some common sense idea at the heart, and nearly everyone from the first group who reads so much as a sentence, or even hears it quoted, at once dives headlong into the second group.

Chesterton collections really don't need any headings, and those supplied cannot help but be more sedate and boring than the lively bits below them. In that regard, this volume is no exception. There are three sections of poems, but nothing stops the reader from wildly reading them all together. The book starts off with selections from the autobiography, the last thing Chesterton wrote, not the first, published in 1936, a few months before his final farewell. This is one of the few collections to quote at all from the so- called Catholic books, which is to say, those published after 1922, or for that matter, to quote any Catholics. Most of the best- known non- fiction, including Orthodoxy, and the best known novels, including The Man Who Was Thursday and The Ball and the Cross, however, not to say the first Father Brown mysteries, were published long before that time.

One very helpful feature of the book is that each selection includes the source from which it is taken, which enables the interested reader to track down the books which catch his or her fancy. The selections range from a paragraph to a few pages, to an entire story, in the case of the Father Brown mysteries. Now that Ignatius has embarked on its publishing project, the Collected Chesterton, the lesser known titles are easier to obtain, and, for that reason, more widely read. But even those with well- thumbed GK books lining the library shelves will find this volume a valuable guide to finding (again) that zinger that lies buried in the stacks somewhere (who knows where), and which converted the reader, a former member of the first group, to a true believer.
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