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Fb2 I Tell You Now: Autobiographical Essays by Native American Writers (American Indian Lives) ePub

by Brian Swann,Arnold Krupat

Category: History and Criticism
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Brian Swann,Arnold Krupat
ISBN: 0803227140
ISBN13: 978-0803227149
Language: English
Publisher: University of Nebraska Press (October 1, 1987)
Pages: 283
Fb2 eBook: 1555 kb
ePub eBook: 1152 kb
Digital formats: rtf lrf azw mbr

I TELL YOU NOW is a collection of 18 short autobiographies by Native American poets and writers. Some writers were reluctant to focus too much on themselves, having been taught to avoid the limelight, to be modest and self-effacing

I TELL YOU NOW is a collection of 18 short autobiographies by Native American poets and writers. Though a sense of alienation and of being people apart flows through the book, the different takes on being Indian in the USA are nearly as many as the writers. Some are angry, some hurt by life circumstances more than by prejudice, yet others pursue successful careers, while others have fought self-destructive habits for years. Some writers were reluctant to focus too much on themselves, having been taught to avoid the limelight, to be modest and self-effacing. This is culturally understandable, but if you refuse to write about yourself, you can't really write autobiography !

Here First is an important new collection of essays by Native American writers compiled by Arnold Krupat and Brian Swann. This anthology of 26 essays is a follow-up to I Tell You Now (1978).

Here First is an important new collection of essays by Native American writers compiled by Arnold Krupat and Brian Swann. The authors, born mostly in the 1940s or after, come from many different tribes. Some are full blood, others mixed; some were raised on a reservation, others weren't; and some are well known, others obscure. They are professors, artists, poets, novelists, playwrights, social workers, and more.

For these Native American writers, being caught between two cultures has sharpened the struggle for self-identity and a. .

For these Native American writers, being caught between two cultures has sharpened the struggle for self-identity and a sense of self-worth. They describe their bittersweet memories of childhood and family life, their fight against prejudice and poverty, their triumph over personal problems, their role models and schooling, their reverence for the land and anger over the rape of it, and their sources of artistic inspiration. Metaphorically or literally, they do go home again-to a proud and dignified cultural heritage.

Brian Swann and. Arnold Krupat. Lincoln: U Nebraska Press, 1987 Documents Similar To I Tell You Now Autobiographical Essays by Native American Writers. Carousel Previous Carousel Next. Lincoln: U Nebraska Press, 1987. Cloth, ISBN 0-8032-2714-0; paper, ISBN 08032-7757-1. Survival This Way: Interviews with American Indian Poets. The second reason for needing both of these books is simply the number of contributors that do not appear in both. Bruchac interviews Peter Blue Cloud, Diane Burns, Louise Erdrich, Lance Henson, Karoniaktatie, Harold Littlebird, N. Scott Momaday, Luci Tapahonso, James Welch, Roberta Hill Whiteman and Ray Young Bear. Documents Similar To I Tell You Now Autobiographical Essays by Native American Writers.

By Arnold Krupat, Brian Swann. I Tell You Now: Autobiographical Essays by Native American Writers. By Arnold Krupat, Brian Swann.

Native American Autobiography is the first collection to bring together the major autobiographical narratives by Native American people from the earliestĀ .

Native American Autobiography is the first collection to bring together the major autobiographical narratives by Native American people from the earliest documents that exist to the present. The thirty narratives included here cover a range of tribes and cultural areas, over a span of more than 200 years.

Twenty-seven Native American writers describe their lives and art in a compelling collection of personalĀ .

Twenty-seven Native American writers describe their lives and art in a compelling collection of personal and family histories illuminated by verse and song, story and narrative, all fed by the strong oral tradition of the indigenous peoples of this country. EVERYTHING MATTERS reveals a broad and complex Native American experience.

A rich diversity of attitude, experience, and literary style can be seen in I Tell You Now. For these Native American writers, being caught between two cultures has sharpened the struggle for self-identity and a sense of self-worth. They describe their bittersweet memories of childhood and family life, their fight against prejudice and poverty, their triumph over personal problems, their role models and schooling, their reverence for the land and anger over the rape of it, and their sources of artistic inspiration. Metaphorically or literally, they do go home again—to a proud and dignified cultural heritage. And the vehicle for these inheritors of an oral tradition is the written word.

In their introduction, the editors, Brian Swann and Arnold Krupat, trace the history of Native American autobiography in its various forms.

Comments to eBook I Tell You Now: Autobiographical Essays by Native American Writers (American Indian Lives)
Agamaginn
beautiful haunting stories.

The requirement to add several more words is really annoying. I cannot do it. at all. ever.
Ynonno
When the Romans destroyed the temple of Jerusalem, crushed Jewish resistance, and sent the survivors into exile, nobody could have predicted that the exiles would treasure their language, their culture, and their religious identity for nearly two thousand years. Some dreamed of their old land during their times of troubles, others assimilated to the lands of exile. They became "others" but at the same time remained Jews. They mixed with Romans, Teutons, Slavs, Arabs, Iranians and Ethiopians, to name a few, but kept that separate identity as well. Everybody knows what finally happened---it's the Mother of All Property Disputes. As a descendant of that people, I have always looked at the Native Americans with considerable empathy. Though they didn't lose every shred of their land in many cases, they were otherwise "taken to the cleaners", even villainized for trying to defend their own land, condemned to live at the bottom of the American heap. If modern Indians are bitter about this, if they don't love the Stars and Stripes, who could blame them ? The astonishing thing is that so many do accept their citizenship. Deep inside though, the survivors of the American genocide cling to the land, to the sense of belonging here, to an identity which marks them as separate. At the same time, their families too have mingled and assimilated, so condemning "whites" or "blacks" can often be equivalent to condemning a part of oneself. How can individuals come to terms with such ambivalence ? I TELL YOU NOW is a collection of 18 short autobiographies by Native American poets and writers. Though a sense of alienation and of being people apart flows through the book, the different takes on being Indian in the USA are nearly as many as the writers. Some are angry, some hurt by life circumstances more than by prejudice, yet others pursue successful careers, while others have fought self-destructive habits for years. Poetry runs through the book---each chapter includes some of the author's verses---as does love of the land and the feeling of being connected to it. Some writers were reluctant to focus too much on themselves, having been taught to avoid the limelight, to be modest and self-effacing. This is culturally understandable, but if you refuse to write about yourself, you can't really write autobiography ! We'll have to conclude that it's a European-derived form, not necessarily one which appeals to Native Americans. Still, the shy response tells us about modern Indian cultures too. Given the way the USA is going, will the Native Americans have to wait so long to get their lands back ? Probably not. But will the lands be still inhabitable ? The big question.

Though I found the book interesting, it is rather too choppy to be a five star book. Participation by people who didn't want to participate also dulls the edge quite a bit. You just start to think about the person who is writing, start to wonder about their experience, thoughts and personality, and the chapter is over. For those who are really into Native American literature, the authors may be familiar. I had not heard of most of them, so started from scratch each time. If a reader is more familiar with the present condition of each native nation, it would help as well, since a New Englander like me has little contact or experience with the native peoples of Alaska, Oklahoma, New Mexico, etc. In short, I TELL YOU NOW stems from a good idea, but perhaps the execution leaves something to be desired.
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