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Fb2 From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books ePub

by JT Waldman,Harvey Pekar,Arie Kaplan

Category: History and Criticism
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: JT Waldman,Harvey Pekar,Arie Kaplan
ISBN: 0827608438
ISBN13: 978-0827608436
Language: English
Publisher: The Jewish Publication Society; First Edition edition (September 10, 2008)
Pages: 240
Fb2 eBook: 1188 kb
ePub eBook: 1400 kb
Digital formats: lrf docx mbr azw

In From Krakow to Krypton, Arie Kaplan unmasks the Jewish subtexts of these stories and showcases the unique . Kaplan’s book is an excellent history of comic books.

In From Krakow to Krypton, Arie Kaplan unmasks the Jewish subtexts of these stories and showcases the unique contributions Jews have made to this American art form. The book features original interviews with legendary figures such as Will Eisner, Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, Al Jaffee, Neil Gaiman, Jerry Robinson, and Art Spiegelman, giving fans an inside look at the people behind the stories. He starts at the beginning, 1933, when Funnies on Parade was published by Max Gaines, the father of the modern comic book, as well as the father of the aforementioned William Gaines.

From Krakow to Krypton book.

Электронная книга "From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books", Arie Kaplan. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Arie Kaplan is the author of From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic . Arie lectures all over the country about comic books, comedians, and popular culture. JT is currently working on his next graphic novel with Harvey Pekar.

Arie Kaplan is the author of From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books, a 2008 National Jewish Book Award Finalist and 2009 Sophie Brody Honor Book (awarded by the American Library Association). Kaplan is a comedian, MAD magazine writer, and author of the comic book miniseries Speed Racer: Chronicles of the Racer for IDW Publishing.

Arie Kaplan has been a Mad Magazine writer-that is to say, scriptwriter-for years, and thus is a true inheritor of the . Speaking of choices: let's talk about Kaplan's narrative selection.

Arie Kaplan has been a Mad Magazine writer-that is to say, scriptwriter-for years, and thus is a true inheritor of the tradition, going back to the days of the early comics. History, for Kaplan, is personal, and it's rare when you are handed a complex historical narrative written by a bona fide creator of American popular culture. From Krakow to Krypton is not always keen on the conflicts within the comic book industry between tight-fisted titans and overworked creative artists, many of whom were Jewish but looked at economics from different angles.

German translation here. Arie Kaplan From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 2008. This book looks at the history of comics from a Jewish perspective, and how Jews and Jewish sensibilities shaped the comic book medium and, by so doing, influenced society.

Jews created the first comic book, the first graphic novel, the first comic book convention, the first .

Jews created the first comic book, the first graphic novel, the first comic book convention, the first comic book specialty store, and they helped create the underground comics (or "Comix") movement of the late '60s and early '70s. Many of the creators of the most famous comic books, such as Superman, Spiderman, X-Men, and Batman, as well as the founders of MAD Magazine, were Jewish.

Arie Kaplan's new book, "From Krakow to Krypton" is a history of Jews in Comic Books, illustrated in graphic comic-style, and featuring interviews with Stan Lee, Art Spiegelman, Will Eisner, and more.

From Krakow to Krypton Jews and Comic Books.

Jewish Publication Society Jews created the first comic book, the first graphic novel, the first comic book convention, the first comic book specialty store, and they helped create the underground comics (or Comix ) movement of the late ‘60s and early ‘70s.

Jews created the first comic book, the first graphic novel, the first comic book convention, the first comic book specialty store, and they helped create the underground comics (or “Comix”) movement of the late ‘60s and early ‘70s. Many of the creators of the most famous comic books, such as Superman, Spiderman, X-Men, and Batman, as well as the founders of MAD magazine, were Jewish. From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books tells their stories and demonstrates how they brought a uniquely Jewish perspective to their work and to the comics industry as a whole. Over-sized and in full color, From Krakow to Krypton is filled with sidebars, cartoon bubbles, comic book graphics, original design sketches, and photographs. It is a visually stunning and exhilarating history.
Comments to eBook From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
Written in Queens, NY, made in China but pure American is Arie Kaplan's From Krakow to Krypton, the story of how the Jews created comic books and brought to the United States a Mississippi-like watershed river of illustrated stories, humor and adventures that fired up every kid's imagination, lifting them from the doldrums of an otherwise tedious world.

From Krakow to Krypton starts at the very first comic book created by Charlie Gaines (Ginsberg) during the Great Depression and flows from there fed by continuous tributaries but also through the dams and rough waters created by folks fearful of this new industry. Crisp, color illustrations adorn the journey.

Imagine having a spanking new copy of the cover of ACTION Number One Published in June 1938- the magazine that not only heralded in Superman but all the Superheroes that today are making Hollywood history and stunning box office grosses. This is a must for everyone who loves the Comic Book and like Levy's Real Jewish Rye; you don't have to be Jewish to love it.

Raúl daSilva; author: first place national book festival prizewinner, The World of Animation.
Gadar
as stated before in regard to another book on the same subject, some of the material in this book was not new to me, since I've been reading many books lately on the history of comics, but this book has a lot in it that is new to me. I loved comix as a kid growing up. Now that I learn the story behind them, I have a a new appreciation of the subject
TheJonnyTest
Great book. Lots of interesting info on Jewish immigration and super heroes. Critical examination of the subject in depth. Wow
Joony
Given as a gift, recipient loved it,
Samardenob
A good, solid book! Amazing how Kaplan, keeps things straight and in order.

Entertaining and informative!
Ziena
A few weeks ago, we attended the Arkansas Literary Festival, 2017. We saw Arie Kaplan’s presentation on his book, From Krakow to Krypton: Jews and Comic Books. We bought a copy of his book after seeing the presentation. The book is a history of comic books from a Jewish perspective. That’s almost redundant. Many, if not most, of the early artists, writers, and publishers of what we have come to know as the comic book were of Jewish heritage. The history of comic books is from a Jewish perspective.

As a youth, I read a lot of comic books. I started out with DC Comics: Batman, Superman, The Flash, and Green Lantern. I’ll admit it; I even bought my share of Aquaman comics. Later, I graduated from DC to Marvel. My favorites were Fantastic Four, Spider-Man, Daredevil, and Iron Man. Also, of course, I read quite a lot of Mad Magazine and its competitor Cracked.

My comics reading wasn’t limited to actual comics. The first biography I remember reading was The Mad World of William M. Gaines, by Frank Jacobs. William Gaines became, and remains, one of my real-life heroes. I have continued to be interested in my comic book heroes. I can’t say that I’ve seen all the super-hero movies that have come out, but I’ve seen most of them. I’ve waited for some of them to come out on cable.

Enough about my credentials to review this book. I would recommend it to anyone interested in the back-story of the comic books we enjoyed as children, teenagers, and young adults.

Kaplan’s book is an excellent history of comic books. He starts at the beginning, 1933, when Funnies on Parade was published by Max Gaines, the father of the modern comic book, as well as the father of the aforementioned William Gaines. Kaplan digs deep, and tells us about the well-known heroes as well as the unsung heroes of the modern comic book industry. He tells the story of Bill Finger, the forgotten co-creator of Batman. He writes about Jack Kirby, whose contributions to the Marvel comics universe were often uncredited.

He tells us about the villains of the history of comic books. Dr. Frederick Wertham (also Jewish; even the villains are Jewish here) attacked comic books as contributing to juvenile delinquency. Dr. Wertham’s crusade dealt a near-fatal blow to the comic book industry. Politicians recognized a good issue and joined the attack. The industry tried to defend itself against the witch hunt. Particularly targeted were the books published by William Gaines. Gaines defended himself heroically before Congress, but ultimately the panic prevailed, and all of his books but Mad, which he had converted to a magazine format, went out of publication. Comics publishers who wanted to survive submitted to the Comics Code Authority, a self-censorship organization.

Comic books bounced back from the attack. Even under the restrictive Comics Code, DC and Marvel were able to create interesting and entertaining stories. And of course Mad Magazine, refitted to avoid control under the Comics Code Authority, became a major influence on American culture.

Now, as we all know, comic book movies are a major source for the movie industry. And comic books themselves are still a major industry, entertaining children and adults alike.

I recommend this book highly.
J.G. "Gerry" Schulze
Nakora
Once upon a time, I read comic books for enjoyment. I used to buy Howard the Duck, Spiderman, Batman, Nova, and the 1970's Marvel westerns. That was then, this is now.

At the tender age of 40 plus, I finally learn that the creators of my favorite books were Jewish! Not that it made a difference to my enjoyment that Bob Kane, Stanley Lieber, Larry Lieber, Jack Kirby, Jerry Siegel, Joe Shuster, and so many others had a Judaic background, but now that I know that, some pieces have fallen into place.

Arie Kaplan has written "From Krakow to Krypton", and explores the Jewish mythologies one more time. Danny Fingeroth, in "Disguised as Clark Kent", also took on the monumental task of studying the origins of the characters and their circumstances with relation to Jewish teaching. Both books are marvelous, and come across a little differently. "Krakow to Krypton" breaks the development of the comic book age into Golden, Silver, and Bronze with discussions centering on different topics and the logical progression from Eisner to Lee to Spiegleman.

While comic books were not overtly Jewish, the concept of `strange visitor from another planet' and the `last survivor' reflect the Jewish transition during passages to America to escape oppression. Images like Clark Kents' bespectacled, book worm, mild mannered was stereotypical of being Jewish. Even the name, Kal-el, while it sounded neat to readers of the time period contained Hebrew. Roughly translated, it means "All that God is". Jewish readers would have picked up on that, while others would miss that entirely. The myth of Golem could even be read into Superman (as Eisner did).

What is remarkable about this book is the depth of the discussion and the obscure examples of Judaic references in specific issues. For instance the prayer by the Thing from Fantastic Four (2002) is outstanding. Joe Kuberts' Ragman, Yossel: April 19, 1943, and Caper by Winnick make Kaplans' point beautifully. Throughout the life of Will Eisner, his work evokes a certain aura of Jewishness, and if we consider "Contract With God", "Zion", and the Spirit, the influence is powerful. If we add into the mix, the X Men by Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, and Chris Claremont, the aliens within us theme is even stronger.

I was mesmerized by the easy to read, easy to digest, and most importantly, the passion that Kaplan displays for his subject. Well chosen art accompanies the book, yet I hope the final pictures are taken from flat books (not bound in hardcover).

Viewed as a series of two books, Krakow and Disguised should be primary sources for truly academic discussions why comics aren't just for kids anymore.

I highly recommend "From Krakow to Krypton", just after morning prayers.
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