» » Translation and Commentary on the Lectures on Greek Rhetoric by Pedro Nunes, 1502-1578: The Art of Public Speaking, Book 1

Fb2 Translation and Commentary on the Lectures on Greek Rhetoric by Pedro Nunes, 1502-1578: The Art of Public Speaking, Book 1 ePub

by John R. C. Martyn,Pedro Nunes

Category: History and Criticism
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: John R. C. Martyn,Pedro Nunes
ISBN: 0773465065
ISBN13: 978-0773465060
Language: English
Publisher: Edwin Mellen Pr (October 30, 2004)
Pages: 294
Fb2 eBook: 1353 kb
ePub eBook: 1493 kb
Digital formats: lrf lrf mbr docx

Personal Name: Nunes, Pedro, 1502-1578. Varying Form of Title: Art of public speaking. C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners.

Personal Name: Nunes, Pedro, 1502-1578. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Translation And Commen. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

ISBN 13: 9780773465060. Publication Date: 10/30/2004. Help your friends save money!

John R. C. Martyn Pedro Nunes. new books · special offers · used books.

John R. Product: book ISBN-10: 0-7734-6506-5 ISBN-13: 9780773465060 Publisher: Edwin Mellen Press Year: October 30, 2004 Number of pages: 719 Binding/Media: hardback.

Pedro Nunes (Portuguese: ; Latin: Petrus Nonius; 1502 – 11 August 1578) was a Portuguese mathematician, cosmographer, and professor, from a New Christian (of Jewish origin) family.

Pedro Nunes (Portuguese: ; Latin: Petrus Nonius; 1502 – 11 August 1578) was a Portuguese mathematician, cosmographer, and professor, from a New Christian (of Jewish origin) family

A systematic catalogue of works relating to natural philosophy and the mechanical arts; with references to particular passages, and occasional abstracts and remarks.

Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. A systematic catalogue of works relating to natural philosophy and the mechanical arts; with references to particular passages, and occasional abstracts and remarks. Miscellaneous papers.

oratory, the art of swaying an audience by eloquent speech. In ancient Greece and Rome oratory was included under the term rhetoric, which meant the art of composing as well as delivering a speech. Oratory first appeared in the law courts of Athens and soon became important in all areas of life. It was taught by the Sophists.

This book contains an introduction to the rhetorical theories put forward by the most important ancient Greek . by John R. Martyn and Pedro Nunes.

This book contains an introduction to the rhetorical theories put forward by the most important ancient Greek rhetoricians, followed by a modern English translation.

Professor Kennedy, equipped with a rare command of ancient rhetoric, provides us here with a dossier of theoretical Greek treatises on the progymnasmata, put precisely and crisply into English. Students from a variety of disciplines will profit greatly from his efforts.

Pedro Nunes lived in a transition period, during which science was . Nunes was very influential internationally .

Nunes was very influential internationally . Honours.

This book contains an introduction to the rhetorical theories put forward by the most important ancient Greek rhetoricians, followed by a modern English translation of the Latin version of their commentaries in Hermogenes' seminal work on stasis-theory, the basis for writing any sort of speech for a law-court or for public use. Rhetoric today is extremely important in public life, as any politician's speech-writer knows, and the work by Syrianus, Sopater and Marcellimus translated in this book remain the foundations on which all theories of public speaking are built. When Pedro Nunes translated the original texts, no doubt from the recently published Aldine text, he was lecturing to the brightest young law students in Lisbon in the 16th century. It is unique in that in Europe at that time all other works on rhetoric were based on Cicero and Quintilian. The modern English translation will be of great use for students, as it will give them access to the basic theories of speech-writing, well exemplified with plenty of apposite quotations from leading Greek orators, especially Demosthenes, and from major events in Greek history. This version contains the original Latin as well as the
Comments to eBook Translation and Commentary on the Lectures on Greek Rhetoric by Pedro Nunes, 1502-1578: The Art of Public Speaking, Book 1
Yozshujind
Translation and Commentary on the Lectures on Greek Rhetoric by Pedro Nunes (1502-1578): The Art of Public Speaking, Volume 1 by Pedro Nunes, John R. C. Martyn (Studies in Classics, V. 28L Edwin Mellen Press)

Volume one introduces the text and transcribes the manuscripts Latin and Greek text; volume two translates it into English.

Rhetoric was at the centre of ancient education, and argument was at the centre of ancient rhetoric. One of the key elements of the theory of argumentation was the concept of `issue' (stasis), which sought to identify the underlying structure of any given dispute - is it, for example, about a matter of fact (did he do it?), or about the classification or evaluation of an agreed fact (should he have done it?). Greek theoreticians in the second century AD gave the theory a new, more systematic structure and developed sophisticated model strategies for handling each issue. Students who had mastered these models would know what kinds of argument would probably be relevant to a dispute of that kind, and also have a good idea of what, in general, would be an effective way of organising those arguments. By the end of the third century, Hermogenes' On Issues had established itself as a standard text in the field, expounded by teachers of rhetoric in innumerable lecture courses and analysed, elaborated and argued over in an ever-growing stream of commentaries. The history of rhetoric in this period is discussed in more detail in Malcolm Heath's Menander: a Rhetor in Context. (Forthcoming)

Hermogenes On Issues is not an easy read. The theory he expounds is complex, and the exposition often cryptic. The text bristles with technical terms, many of which had multiple uses. It is not surprising that Renaissance readers turned for assistance to the familiar - and more elegant - rhetorical writings of Cicero. But Cicero learned issue-theory from teachers whose work had been rendered obsolete by two centuries of theoretical innovation when Hermogenes wrote. Hence Johannes Sturm's Latin translation and commentary (1570) presents a disconcerting attempt to conflate two very different approaches.

There was another possibility. Hermogenes remained a standard text throughout the Byzantine period, and that ensured the preservation not only of

Hermogenes' text, but also of some of the many late antique commentaries. In particular, the Aldine Rhetores Graeci (1508) had included a composite commentary made up of extracts from several commentators of the fourth and fifth centuries - Sopater, Syrianus and Marcellinus were the main, though not the only contributors. The commentators do not provide easy reading, either. They are more expansive than Hermogenes himself, but they wrote for experts, and did so at a time when Hermogenes was a standard text but not yet an unquestioned authority; so their exposition often takes the form of vigorous dissent from his distinctive positions, and they devote much of their attention to complex, and sometimes obscure, debates with their professional peers and predecessors.

In choosing to approach rhetoric through Hermogenes, and Hermogenes through his Greek commentators, Nunes set himself and his students a double challenge. There were other Latin versions of Hermogenes in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries - by Jacobus Tusanus (1545), Johannes Sturm (1570, 1575), and Caspar Laurentius (1614); but these are very rare books, only to be found in a few major research libraries. Indeed, translations into modem languages have also been hard to come by until very recently: a pioneering, but deeply flawed English version by Ray Nadeau appeared in Speech Monographs 31 (1964), 361-421, but the first satisfactory attempts are Malcolm Heath's Hermogenes On Issues (Oxford University Press, 1995) and Michel Patillon's Hermogenes: L'art rhétorique (Paris, Lausanne: Age d'homme, 1997). But not one of these systematically integrates Hermogenes with his Greek commentators, which have never been translated into any other language. The publication and translation of Nunes' lectures opens up a fascinating new perspective on the Renaissance engagement with the ancient world.

Rhetoric has recently become a popular topic once again, a discipline taught in most Universities and explored in international conferences and in several new journals, especially in the U.S.A. William Satire's Lend me Your Ears (1992) is a good example of a rhetorical best-seller that has 217 speeches from Demosthenes and Cicero, down to Kissinger, Bush senior and Colin Powell. The 'art of public speaking' was certainly extremely important in Nunes' day, as the worldwide growth in demand for governors, lawyers and preachers matched the rapid growth of his country's empire; but communication remains most important, and not just through the latest telephones, Emails and internets. Speechwriters well trained in rhetoric are also in big demand. In Nunes' day, the normal language of communication was Latin, and his choice of Spanish for his algebra proved disastrous for its sales. Otherwise he wisely translated most of his major scientific works from Portuguese into Latin. But it was his fluency in Greek that was extraordinary at that time in Europe, clearly shown by his Greek poems and his rapid and fluent translations of the Greek originals for his lectures on rhetoric. Certainly no contemporary had such a control of that difficult language.

The main problems created by Nunes' black ink pen, by his desire to find the perfect expression, with perfect euphony, and by his unwillingness to slow down his translation of the Greek originals, as he blotted out one or two lines to make a minor change in the word-order, are manifest in the folios of this original manuscript, so many of them covered with ink smudges (as pages were turned over too quickly), and several showing extensive corrections made merely for the sake of euphony. Nunes' ear was highly sensitive to the sound effects and to the rise and fall of the Latin language, and his students must have appreciated his eloquence, nearly always worthy of Demosthenes himself.

Nunes' scientific works have long been in print, and recently his Greek and Latin poems, his Portuguese algebra and his private religious thoughts have been published. Now his translation and edition of the works on Issues by Hermogenes and his commentators is available. These works combine to show the great breadth and depth of Nunes' brilliant scholarship that can be augmented by his excellence as a doctor, as a lecturer and tutor, and as a talented cartographer. A true humanist, he combined Science with the Arts, Writing with Teaching and Invention with Experimentation, and he excelled in every one of these six disciplines.
Xinetan
Translation and Commentary on the Lectures on Greek Rhetoric by Pedro Nunes (1502-1578): The Art of Public Speaking, Volume 1 by Pedro Nunes, John R. C. Martyn (Studies in Classics, V. 28L Edwin Mellen Press)

Volume one introduces the text and transcribes the manuscripts Latin and Greek text; volume two translates it into English.

Rhetoric was at the centre of ancient education, and argument was at the centre of ancient rhetoric. One of the key elements of the theory of argumentation was the concept of `issue' (stasis), which sought to identify the underlying structure of any given dispute - is it, for example, about a matter of fact (did he do it?), or about the classification or evaluation of an agreed fact (should he have done it?). Greek theoreticians in the second century AD gave the theory a new, more systematic structure and developed sophisticated model strategies for handling each issue. Students who had mastered these models would know what kinds of argument would probably be relevant to a dispute of that kind, and also have a good idea of what, in general, would be an effective way of organising those arguments. By the end of the third century, Hermogenes' On Issues had established itself as a standard text in the field, expounded by teachers of rhetoric in innumerable lecture courses and analysed, elaborated and argued over in an ever-growing stream of commentaries. The history of rhetoric in this period is discussed in more detail in Malcolm Heath's Menander: a Rhetor in Context. (Forthcoming)

Hermogenes On Issues is not an easy read. The theory he expounds is complex, and the exposition often cryptic. The text bristles with technical terms, many of which had multiple uses. It is not surprising that Renaissance readers turned for assistance to the familiar - and more elegant - rhetorical writings of Cicero. But Cicero learned issue-theory from teachers whose work had been rendered obsolete by two centuries of theoretical innovation when Hermogenes wrote. Hence Johannes Sturm's Latin translation and commentary (1570) presents a disconcerting attempt to conflate two very different approaches.

There was another possibility. Hermogenes remained a standard text throughout the Byzantine period, and that ensured the preservation not only of

Hermogenes' text, but also of some of the many late antique commentaries. In particular, the Aldine Rhetores Graeci (1508) had included a composite commentary made up of extracts from several commentators of the fourth and fifth centuries - Sopater, Syrianus and Marcellinus were the main, though not the only contributors. The commentators do not provide easy reading, either. They are more expansive than Hermogenes himself, but they wrote for experts, and did so at a time when Hermogenes was a standard text but not yet an unquestioned authority; so their exposition often takes the form of vigorous dissent from his distinctive positions, and they devote much of their attention to complex, and sometimes obscure, debates with their professional peers and predecessors.

In choosing to approach rhetoric through Hermogenes, and Hermogenes through his Greek commentators, Nunes set himself and his students a double challenge. There were other Latin versions of Hermogenes in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries - by Jacobus Tusanus (1545), Johannes Sturm (1570, 1575), and Caspar Laurentius (1614); but these are very rare books, only to be found in a few major research libraries. Indeed, translations into modem languages have also been hard to come by until very recently: a pioneering, but deeply flawed English version by Ray Nadeau appeared in Speech Monographs 31 (1964), 361-421, but the first satisfactory attempts are Malcolm Heath's Hermogenes On Issues (Oxford University Press, 1995) and Michel Patillon's Hermogenes: L'art rhétorique (Paris, Lausanne: Age d'homme, 1997). But not one of these systematically integrates Hermogenes with his Greek commentators, which have never been translated into any other language. The publication and translation of Nunes' lectures opens up a fascinating new perspective on the Renaissance engagement with the ancient world.

Rhetoric has recently become a popular topic once again, a discipline taught in most Universities and explored in international conferences and in several new journals, especially in the U.S.A. William Satire's Lend me Your Ears (1992) is a good example of a rhetorical best-seller that has 217 speeches from Demosthenes and Cicero, down to Kissinger, Bush senior and Colin Powell. The 'art of public speaking' was certainly extremely important in Nunes' day, as the worldwide growth in demand for governors, lawyers and preachers matched the rapid growth of his country's empire; but communication remains most important, and not just through the latest telephones, Emails and internets. Speechwriters well trained in rhetoric are also in big demand. In Nunes' day, the normal language of communication was Latin, and his choice of Spanish for his algebra proved disastrous for its sales. Otherwise he wisely translated most of his major scientific works from Portuguese into Latin. But it was his fluency in Greek that was extraordinary at that time in Europe, clearly shown by his Greek poems and his rapid and fluent translations of the Greek originals for his lectures on rhetoric. Certainly no contemporary had such a control of that difficult language.

The main problems created by Nunes' black ink pen, by his desire to find the perfect expression, with perfect euphony, and by his unwillingness to slow down his translation of the Greek originals, as he blotted out one or two lines to make a minor change in the word-order, are manifest in the folios of this original manuscript, so many of them covered with ink smudges (as pages were turned over too quickly), and several showing extensive corrections made merely for the sake of euphony. Nunes' ear was highly sensitive to the sound effects and to the rise and fall of the Latin language, and his students must have appreciated his eloquence, nearly always worthy of Demosthenes himself.

Nunes' scientific works have long been in print, and recently his Greek and Latin poems, his Portuguese algebra and his private religious thoughts have been published. Now his translation and edition of the works on Issues by Hermogenes and his commentators is available. These works combine to show the great breadth and depth of Nunes' brilliant scholarship that can be augmented by his excellence as a doctor, as a lecturer and tutor, and as a talented cartographer. A true humanist, he combined Science with the Arts, Writing with Teaching and Invention with Experimentation, and he excelled in every one of these six disciplines.
Related to Translation and Commentary on the Lectures on Greek Rhetoric by Pedro Nunes, 1502-1578: The Art of Public Speaking, Book 1
Professing Rhetoric: Selected Papers From the 2000 Rhetoric Society of America Conference eBook
Fb2 Professing Rhetoric: Selected Papers From the 2000 Rhetoric Society of America Conference ePub
The Art of Public Speaking, 11th Edition eBook
Fb2 The Art of Public Speaking, 11th Edition ePub
Rhetoric in the European tradition eBook
Fb2 Rhetoric in the European tradition ePub
The Rhetoric of Modern Statesmanship eBook
Fb2 The Rhetoric of Modern Statesmanship ePub
Greek Rhetoric Before Aristotle eBook
Fb2 Greek Rhetoric Before Aristotle ePub
Rhetoric and Philosophy eBook
Fb2 Rhetoric and Philosophy ePub
MCDANIEL: SCARED SPEECHLESS: (P) PUBLIC SPEAKING STEP BYSTEP.: Public Speaking Step by Step eBook
Fb2 MCDANIEL: SCARED SPEECHLESS: (P) PUBLIC SPEAKING STEP BYSTEP.: Public Speaking Step by Step ePub
The Philosophy of Rhetoric (Landmarks in Rhetoric and Public Address) eBook
Fb2 The Philosophy of Rhetoric (Landmarks in Rhetoric and Public Address) ePub
Rhetoric in the War on Drugs: The Triumphs and Tragedies of Public Relations eBook
Fb2 Rhetoric in the War on Drugs: The Triumphs and Tragedies of Public Relations ePub