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Fb2 Waiting for Sunrise: A Novel ePub

by William Boyd

Category: Genre Fiction
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: William Boyd
ISBN: 0061876771
ISBN13: 978-0061876776
Language: English
Publisher: Harper Perennial (January 2, 2013)
Pages: 384
Fb2 eBook: 1793 kb
ePub eBook: 1734 kb
Digital formats: doc rtf lrf mbr

Waiting for Sunrise is a 2012 espionage novel by William Boyd. The book was published on April 17, 2012 by Bloomsbury Press in the United Kingdom and by HarperCollins in the United States.

Waiting for Sunrise is a 2012 espionage novel by William Boyd. Lysander Rief is a young actor in Vienna who has come to the city to seek a psychiatric cure for an illness – anorgasmia – from an English doctor, Bensimon. Bensimon has developed his own adjunct to the main line of Freud's psychoanalysis called Parallelism.

William Boyd follows his critically acclaimed novels A Good Man in Africa, Brazzaville Beach, and Ordinary Thunderstorms with a razor-sharp, incandescent thriller in. .Waiting for Sunrise - William Boyd.

William Boyd follows his critically acclaimed novels A Good Man in Africa, Brazzaville Beach, and Ordinary Thunderstorms with a razor-sharp, incandescent thriller in Waiting for Sunrise. A provocative exploration of the line between consciousness and reality is nested within a tense, rollercoaster plotline following as a young English actor ensnared in a bewildering scandal with an enigmatic woman in early twentieth-century Vienna.

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Электронная книга "Waiting for Sunrise: A Novel", William Boyd

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Dr Bensimon’s receptionist (a slim, bespectacled, severe-looking woman) had shown him into a small waiting room and mentioned, politely, that he was in fact some forty minutes early for his appointment. Therefore, if he wouldn’t mind waiting until? My mistake – foolish. Coffee? No, thank you. Lysander sat in a low armless black leather chair, one of four in the room, placed in a loose semi-circle facing an empty grate below a plaster mantelpiece, and once again called on calmness to soothe his agitated mood. How could he have been so wrong about the time?

William Boyd is the author of ten novels, including A Good Man in Africa, winner of the Whitbread Award and the Somerset Maugham Award; An Ice-Cream War, winner of the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize and shortlisted for the Booker Prize; Brazzaville Beach, winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize; Any Human Heart, winner of the Prix Jean Monnet and adapted into. a Channel 4 drama; Restless, winner of the Costa Novel of the Year, the Yorkshire Post Novel of the Year and a Richard & Judy selection, and most recently, the bestselling Ordinary Thunderstorms.

William Boyd’s characters are entangled in personal and political issues. This arresting opening to Waiting for Sunrise, a tantalizing, fast-paced spy novel by the prolific William Boyd, reminded me of the first book I read by this curiously engaging author, roughly 20 years ago. The protagonist of Brazzaville Beach, Hope Clearwater, began her tale by confiding, I never really warmed to Clovis - he was far too stupid to inspire real affection - but he always claimed a corner of my heart, largely, I suppose, because of the way he instinctively and unconsciously cupped his genitals whenever he was alarmed or nervous.

Waiting for Sunrise book. William Boyd is a master at dissimulation and at inserting little disturbing notes into the narrative that slowly change the focus from the inner journey of discovery Lysander Rief is going through, to the European conflict that is just about ready to burst. Lysander is an actor and a poet, and most of all an innocent in a world rife with intrigue and betrayals.

In Waiting for Sunrise, William Boyd has come up with it. At least it begins in Vienna, before becoming . At least it begins in Vienna, before becoming very British, just as it is part psychological teaser and part spy novel. Some critics have found the switches of tone and location disorientating, but then Boyd is an unashamedly cosmopolitan writer, and the better for it. Still, the discontinuities can puzzle. It is with some surprise that we witness our well-born, somewhat effete young actor hero mutate into an ingenious and ruthless spy hunter, but then the author has a cunning excuse.

From one of our most celebrated and imaginative writers comes a spellbinding novel about deception, betrayal, psychoanalysis, and the mysteries of the human heart. William Boyd follows his critically acclaimed novels A Good Man in Africa, Brazzaville Beach, and Ordinary Thunderstorms with a razor-sharp, incandescent thriller in Waiting for Sunrise. A provocative exploration of the line between consciousness and reality is nested within a tense, rollercoaster plotline following as a young English actor ensnared in a bewildering scandal with an enigmatic woman in early twentieth-century Vienna. Sophisticated, page-turning, and unforgettable, Boyd’s Waiting for Sunrise is a triumph of literary fiction from one of the most powerful, thought-provoking writers working today.
Comments to eBook Waiting for Sunrise: A Novel
Gerceytone
William Boyd has been writing novels for more than three decades now. His novels are easy to read, with strong plots, well-developed characters and interesting themes. “Waiting for Sunrise” is no exception. Set in World War I the main character is Lysander Rief, an actor who becomes a British intelligence officer, searching for a traitor who is passing secrets to the Germans.

Like all of Boyd’s novels “Sunrise” has a multiplicity of sub-plots from a psychosexual problem that takes our hero to Vienna for treatment with no-one less than Freud, to a sexual cure curtesy of one Hettie Bull, to working as a translator in a wartime internment camp, to taking on the identity of a Swiss railway engineer in the hunt for the traitor. There is much more. All very William Boyd.

Reading the novel we travel in London, Vienna and France, with a complex cast of characters in each of these locations. Along the way we explore psychiatry, espionage, and love. Rief’s experiences remind us that the human mind is endlessly baffling, complex and irrational. Boyd is an expert at developing a network of pacy and well-written plots.

If you are regular reader of William Boyd novels you won’t be disappointed with this one. If you haven’t read Boyd do yourself a favour. You don’t know what you are missing.
Anararius
This is a good book, and kept me glued to the page, but I was rather dissatisfied with the ending, because it raised so many more questions than it answered. In the end, probably more so than any book I have ever read, I wondered if I understood the book at all.

Was the story in the book a true one, or one created by the protagonist as some kind of alternate reality resulting from Rief's practice of "parallelism" and his use of the hallucination-inducing sleeping medicine? Who was really behind Andromeda? Was the code key for deciphering Andromeda's messages a pure coincidence, or somehow related to Rief? What exactly did Rief do to precipitate the final meeting, and who did he expect to show up? What was Hettie Bull's real role? Honestly I was very confused...
Fountain_tenderness
William Boyd is/was a skillful and prolific writer of novels; and they do have variety of place, time and characterization. I have enjoyed each of them, beginning with the accurate evocation of a place and a time. Each work stands very well on its own and each is a novel that needs to 'find the right reader.' Many of those readers are 'out there' and Boyd's novels have been deservedly popular. (Check the leading reviews on Amazon; they are accurate and perceptive.) Well-read fiction fans will benefit from admiring Joseph Conrad (Boyd's 'Brazzaville Beach'; 'An Ice Cream War') and other 'literary' authors. John LeCarre is also cited. I read Boyd's books for 'what they are'' rather than what I 'expected' them to be. Each journey then becomes one of discovery and fascination.

Characterization is central to 'Waiting For Sunrise' (as it is in every Boyd novel.) Lysander Rief comes on the scene as a handsome man in his later twenties. Unevenly educated since his actor-father moved the family from one theater to another, he becomes an actor and furthers his education through preparing for his theatrical roles. Readers are treated to a bit of the Theatrical Life in Britain through this thread of the story. So often playing someone else, Lysander is somewhat late in coming to a mature self-knowledge; most explicitly about sexual matters. He seeks to remedy some of this by traveling to Pre-WWI Vienna for a consultation with a Freudian-influenced psychoanalist--Dr. Bensimon. Vicariously we enter into some of the world of the new psychoanalysis of that day, including a treatment methodology of 'Parallelism'--burying the unpleasant facts from the past by creating a detailed alternate reality. There is serious food for philosophical thought in that plot thread. From that beginning, we are treated to more experience of deception--sneaky adultery, shaky self-deception and the duplicity of spying, even in the cause of one's country. Lysander becomes a counterspy, ferreting out a 'rat' in the British War Machine...but working without any training other than his acting ability. He takes personal risks that trained agents would have avoided in a somewhat naive search for facts. At the end of this novel I believe Boyd wants us to ask ourselves if Lysander really did get to the true bottom of the deception...or if any deception--by ourselves or others--can ever be completely laid to rest. I put the book aside after finishing reading but my thinking kept working on, much like the nagging itch left by many modern short-story writers. If you are that kind of reader, I believe you will LIKE 'Waiting For Sunrise.'
Jieylau
Lysander is in Vienna hoping for a cure for his medical problem. His first trip to the psychiatric office sets him down a dangerous path.

I would give this 3.5 stars. The writing is very descriptive and engaging. But I think the actual plot is only decent. The side characters that make up the story weren't fully explained. There are a lot of hints of possible conspiracies, but as a reader you are never sure which ones to take seriously. This made for an unexplained story in my book. Maybe that's what reviewers chalk up to the psychological aspect of the story, but to me it just made it feel half-thought out at times.
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