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Fb2 The Insufficiency of Maps: A Novel ePub

by Nora Pierce

Category: Genre Fiction
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Nora Pierce
ISBN: 0743292073
ISBN13: 978-0743292078
Language: English
Publisher: Atria Books; 1 edition (April 17, 2007)
Pages: 224
Fb2 eBook: 1365 kb
ePub eBook: 1795 kb
Digital formats: lrf lit mobi doc

The Insufficiency of Maps book. In this powerful debut novel by award-winning Nora Pierce, a young girl must discover the meaning of self and family as she struggles to find her place between two contrasting realities.

The Insufficiency of Maps book. On the reservation, Alice lives in a run-down trailer. Both her parents are alcoholics.

The Insufficiency of Maps: A Novel.

It's terribly challenging to write a child's first person point of view in an adult work, and Pierce accomplishes it masterfully. Through this naive lens the author gives tremendous insight into cultural wealth and poverty, mental illness and the soaring imagination inextricably tied to it, as well as the emotional hurdles of a child displaced by virtually everyone.

I'm doing a book report and I need some help with a few of the questions. 1. Describe the story's setting including location, environment, and time (in history and/or da. Explain the importance of the setting. 5. Describe the main conflict(s) including whether they are internal or external. Is the fire at the end of the novel a resolution? Does setting fire to her Indian heritage by Alice bring her a sense of completion, a sense of resolution? It is perhaps more reflective of life in general with its minor triumphs, fleeting pleasures and in this, leans to an existentialist bent. Alice is preoccupied with creating a sense of meaning in her world.

Include any personal information. Mention spoilers or the book's price. 0) 50 characters minimum.

Nora Pierce's debut novel, The Insufficiency of Maps, explores the textures and mysteries of the fundamental human experiences - love, dependence, marginality, madness-in a poetic style which does not seek to simply explicate those textures and mysteries, but embodies them. Janet Fitch, author of White Oleander. Nora Pierce will write many great books that will sell increasing numbers of copies. She's gonna be a Wonder Woman. Sherman Alexie, author of The Toughest Indian in the World

Nora Pierce is the author of the novel The Insufficiency of Maps, a selection of the Barnes & Noble Discover . José Skinner’s Flight and Other Stories was a finalist for the Western States Book Award for Fiction

Nora Pierce is the author of the novel The Insufficiency of Maps, a selection of the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers program. She is currently in residence at the Cité Internationale des Arts in Paris, and at work on a new novel. She teaches writing at Stanford University, where she was formerly a Wallace Stegner fellow. José Skinner’s Flight and Other Stories was a finalist for the Western States Book Award for Fiction. He worked as an English/Spanish translator and interpreter in the criminal courts of New Mexico before earning his MFA at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

Home Slice also recommends: The Insufficiency of Maps by Nora Pierce. Mental Illness is an issue that touches each of us. I'm grateful to be a contributor to this collection of creative writing shining a light on the subject. November is Native American Heritage Month. 12 Native American Authors to Read During Native American Heritage Month Bookish. 11 September ·. A film out of the archives: Saundra Sharp, Robert Hooks, Hattie Winston in Hollow Image 1979.

Nora Pierce is the author of the novel The Insufficiency of Maps, a selection of the Barnes . Todd James Pierce is the author of three books, including the novel A Woman of Stone and the short story collection Newsworld, which won the 2006 Drue Heinz Literature Prize.

Nora Pierce is the author of the novel The Insufficiency of Maps, a selection of the Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers program. He is an assistant professor of English at Cal Poly State University in San Luis Obispo, California.

The Insufficiency of Maps (Atria, 2006) by Nora Pierce. Tomorrow They Will Kiss (Back Bay Books, 2006) by Eduardo Santiago. Seeing Emily (Harry N. Adams, 2005) by Joyce Lee Wong. The Immigrants’ Daughter: A Private Battle to Earn the Right to Self-actualization (Booklocker, 2005) by Mary Terzian. Library of Author Biographies: Karen Hesse (Rosen Pub Group, 2005) by Nzingha Clark. Maps of City & Body: Shedding Light on the Performance of Denise Uyehara (Kaya Press, 2004) by Denise Uyehara. My Sweet Unconditional (Tia Chucha Press, 2004) by Ariel Robello

In this debut novel by award-winning Nora Pierce, a young girl must discover the meaning of self and family as she struggles to find her place between two contrasting realities.On the reservation, Alice lives in a run-down trailer. Both her parents are alcoholics. She seldom has enough food and she rarely attends school, but she is free to follow her imagination. She is connected to the life and ancestry of her people and the deep love she receives from her family and community.When her mother succumbs to schizophrenia, Alice is removed from her home and placed with a white foster family in the suburbs. This new world is neat and tidy and wholesome, but it is also alien, and Alice is unmoored from everything she has ever known and everything that has defined her.As she traces Alice's journey between two cultures, Pierce asks probing questions about identity and difference, and she articulates vital truths about the contemporary Native American experience.
Comments to eBook The Insufficiency of Maps: A Novel
Hap
This book was a pleasure to read, was enthralled from start to finish, and hanging on the author's words especially at the close of each of the last four chapters. Her prose is precise and lyrical, and there is a takeaway in this book for everyone no matter your personal experience.
Runeterror
"The Insufficiency of Maps" by Nora Pierce is a compelling but flawed story concerning an endearing, imaginative, and confused child struggling against adversity. The story begins with Alice, a five-year old Native American girl telling us about the bus trip she is taking with her mother. They are taking an exhausting, exciting journey so her mother can be married. They end up in an impoverished Indian reservation in Arizona where Alice is introduced to a man who may be her "Papi."

The next two-thirds of the book covers a few short months in the child's life. The reader learns everything through the quiet, all-observing, eyes-wide-open voice of vulnerable little five-year old Alice. We can't help but fall in love with this child! Through the child's inexperienced young voice, the reader is able to recognize what the child cannot. While she gets to know her Papi, plays around his dilapidated trailer, makes friends, goes to school, and later goes with her mother to live with her grandfather in Los Angeles, we are consumed by fear. We cannot put this book down, so fearful are we for the young child at every turn. We see Alice exposed to poverty, endangered by malnutrition, and victimized by neglect. Her caregivers are absent, alcoholic, or mentally or physically ill. They all love her, but are incapable of fulfilling her most basic needs. It is heart-wrenching and utterly compelling.

In the last third of the book, Alice becomes orphaned, and is taken into the foster care system. She begins living with a family in the white suburbs of Los Angeles. Alice seems lost in this completely alien culture. Trying to find her way, she becomes obsessed with maps.

In a succession of brief chapters, Alice grows up. During this period, we see Alice only through quick glimpses--a series of sketches, nothing full enough to reimagine clearly how the child is changing. All too quickly we are at the end of the novel. Alice is suddenly 14, and she is finally able to put some important thing in perspective and take matters into her own hands. The novel ends with an unexpected and satisfying coming-of-age experience that puts Alice squarely on the path toward self-realization.

Pierce's prose is elegant, literary, spare, and lyrical. The dialogue is excellent. Overall, I was pleased and impressed. In particular, the author successfully transports the reader into life on a modern-day Indian reservation, and exposes us clearly to the disabling upheaval of foster care. I look forward to reading more by this talented author; however, I have mixed feelings for this work as a whole. For the first two thirds I was absolutely enthralled; I could not stop reading; I was completely captivated and compelled. But at the point where Alice is transferred into foster care, the book abruptly changes pace and voice. Alice seems to have the very life drained from her. As a reader, I could no longer imagine Alice or believe in her as a middle-schooler, preteen, or adolescent. Thus the overall three-star rating on a book that might easily have earned five stars.
Rollers from Abdun
I don't want to sound immature by saying that the story of Alice, an impoverished yet amazing girl is messed up, but I repeatedly found myself saying, "Wow, that's so messed up."

A few of the other reviewers have summarized the story nicely, but some things I wanted to add are about the story as a whole. Since Alice is five when the novel begins, we get a very broad spectrum of incidents she sees and experiences while not always understanding them. This causes a deliciously frustrating yet refreshing perspective which parallels to the misfortunate saying, "Children are to be seen and not heard." How can you not hear this child's story? How can you not feel the innocent love she has for her Mami and later her Grampa? Alice has so much she wants to tell, all we can do is listen.

Many people are aware of how difficult it is for natives who live on a reservation-- the alcohol, the harsh living conditions, the poverty-- but Nora Pierce makes all of it real with in-your-face writing that slams the truth right on your feet.

I agree with the reviewer who said that the voice of the novel and pacing changes when Alice is taken into foster care. It's a noticeable shift, yet I believe Alice had a reason for it: she was being taken away from the things she knew into a family who thought they were doing something nice for her. Even though she grew to like this family, she still longed for the one she felt she was taken from.

The prose is sparse, much like how children speak to get the a point, and it moves with a fluidity I don't encounter is many books. I like that we don't know what happened to Alice's mother, or to Alice. I like that she still has a long way to go before she can overcome her demons and that nothing is wrapped up neat and tidy. I recommend Nora Pierce and this sad yet gripping novel for a look into the world we see but do not hear. You won't be disappointed.
Kamick
Pierce shows us the gritty struggles of mid-twentieth century Native Americans. Untreated illnesses, extreme poverty, alcoholism, domestic violence scars the life of young Alice. Alice is immune to her problems, often playing along with her mother's delusions and paranoia. But, she's not immune to her heritage. For nearly nine years, Alice attempts to map her life within the context of other maps. Maps are her passion, so is her heritage. She just wants to find out who she really is. We see other characters, even her white foster family, struggle with their identities. Lesser character Sister Joanne, strict Catholic nun, cannot stand to see stereotypical portryals of Native Americans.

Pierce does a great job of putting together Native American life in the late 1960s- 1970s. The American Indian Movement visits Yuma, where Inez's dialogue with Alice shows us that even such "progressives" aren't sure what they want.

This book will leave you with chills! You will analyze and overanalyze the choices of each character in the story. You may even gag or wince when you read about untreated fungal infections, horrific B.O., alcohol breath, etc. And no matter how weirded out or grossed out you are, you'll want to keep reading!
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