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Fb2 The Shootist ePub

by Miles Swarthout,Glendon Swarthout

Category: Genre Fiction
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Miles Swarthout,Glendon Swarthout
ISBN: 0803238231
ISBN13: 978-0803238237
Language: English
Publisher: Bison Books; Reprint edition (October 1, 2011)
Pages: 248
Fb2 eBook: 1109 kb
ePub eBook: 1303 kb
Digital formats: mbr lrf lrf mbr

Glendon Fred Swarthout (April 8, 1918, near Pinckney, Michigan – September 23, 1992, Scottsdale, Arizona) was an American writer and novelist. Several of his novels were made into films.

Glendon Fred Swarthout (April 8, 1918, near Pinckney, Michigan – September 23, 1992, Scottsdale, Arizona) was an American writer and novelist. Where the Boys Are, and The Shootist which was John Wayne's last work, are probably the best known. Glendon Swarthout was the only child of Fred and Lila (Chubb) Swarthout, a banker and a homemaker. Swarthout is a Dutch name; his mother's maiden name was from Yorkshire.

The Shootist by Glendon Swarthout is the taleof the Old West's version of the modern 'hit man'. The Shootist is John Bernard Books, a man of principle and the only surviving gunfighter in a vanishing American West. It is a splendid story, well-told and with a really satisfying ending. Charleston, South Carolina Evening Post. From the Inside Flap. He rides into El Paso in the year 1901, on the day Queen Victoria died, there to be told by a doctor that he must soon confront the greatest shootist of all: Death. In such a showdown, against such an antagonist,.

Author Glendon Swarthout creates a three-dimensional character out of the conventionally one-dimensional Western .

Author Glendon Swarthout creates a three-dimensional character out of the conventionally one-dimensional Western antihero. Swarthout, who died in 1992 at age 74, had a special talent for writing the kind of western novel that told its story by getting deeply into the heads of its characters.

Glendon Swarthout, Miles Swarthout. By the author of The Homesman, now a major motion picture The Shootist is John Bernard Books, a gunfighter at the turn of the twentieth century who must confront the greatest Shootist of all: Death. Most men would end their days in bed or take their own lives, but a gunfighter has a third option, one that Books decides to exercise. He may choose his own executioner

THE SHOOTIST is John Bernard Books, a man of principle and the only surviving gunfighter in a vanishing American West

The nail biters, thumb suckers and teeth grinders at the Box Canyon Boys Camp were called the Bedwetters. They were the cast-away offspring of parents who were busy traveling, being divorced, remarrying and garnering fortunes. He rides into El Paso in the year 1901, on the day Queen Victoria died, there to be told by a doctor that he must soon confront the greatest shootist of all: Death himself. In such a showdown, against such an antagonist, he cannot win. He may choose his own executioner. As word spreads that the famous assassin has incurable cancer, an assortment of human vultures gathers to feast on the corpse-among them a gambler, a rustler, a clergyman, an undertaker, an old.

Razor arrested, Books paused to consider the reflection in the mirror of the undertaker behind him, who seemed in turn to be mesmerized by the reflection, half lather, half menace, of the gun man before him. "Here's what you will do, Beckum. Just what they did to Hardin here, after he was gone.

Shootist Audiobook Written By Glendon Swarthout. The Shootistis John Bernard Books, a man of principle and the only surviving gunfighter in a vanishing American West. He rides into El Pasoin the year 1901, on the day of Queen Victoria's demise, there to be told by a doctor that he must soon confront the greatestShootistof all: Death himself. In such a showdown against such an antagonist, J. B. Bookscannot. wi. ost men may end their days in bed or take their own lives, but a mankiller has a third option, one which Books decides to exercise.

MILES SWARTHOUT is the son of bestselling novelist Glendon Swarthout, who wrote the original classic Western, The Shootist. Miles Swarthout adapted that novel for what became John Wayne's final film. Miles's novel The Sergeant's Lady won a Spur Award for Best First Novel from the Western Writers of America in 2004. He resides in Playa del Rey. Miles Swarthout.

The Shootist is John Bernard Books, a gunfighter at the turn of the twentieth century who must confront the greatest Shootist of all: Death.

Great movie, better book. com User, December 7, 2007. Western Writers of America designated The Shootist as One of the Best Western Novels Ever Written. The book is harder edged than the film, which is excellent as well. The Shootist was John Wayne's last movie and his best acting performance.

   The Shootist is John Bernard Books, a gunfighter at the turn of the twentieth century who must confront the greatest Shootist of all: Death. Most men would end their days in bed or take their own lives, but a gunfighter has a third option, one that Books decides to exercise. He may choose his own executioner.
Comments to eBook The Shootist
SadLendy
Having watched the movie, The Shootist, many times, I decided to read the original book by Glendon Swarthout for a comparison. What a pleasure. It was all there, which proves why the movie was so well received by Western fans. The book is a captivating look at the winding down of the Amerian West and its icons.
The book entwines the gentle relationship that develops between the boarding house owner, Mrs. Rogers, and the dying gunfighter, J. B. Books, with the skullduggery that swirls around the tough guys of El Paso. All want a chance to be the one credited with killing the notorious Books. Add to that, the greedy hoard that descends on the dying man seeking to make money out of his death.
Of particular interest to me was the introduction by Swarthout’s son, describing the complications and rigors of filming in the high altitude of Carson City, Nevada, with John Wayne’s failing health. As is usually the case, there were many clashes between Wayne and the director, Don Siegel, on how the cinematic story should be told. Paramount among the changes that Wayne demanded, was the ending of the movie. Though different, I like both the book and the movie endings.
The Shootist is truly a classic among Westerns, told in a sparse, lean style that tells a compelling story with a solid narrative and authentic late 1800’s dialogue. You just can’t get any better than J.B. Books’ credo:
"I will not be wronged, I will not be insulted and I will not be laid a hand on. I do not do these things to other people, and I require the same from them."
Qiahmagha
This book is a trick bag. On the one hand, it is very much like the movie starring John Wayne; the dialogue is mostly verbatim. On the other hand, the book is very different from the movie. So the trick is trying to divorce the movie from the book when the two are so similar yet so different. If you can manage that, it’s a terrific read. The prose is lean and spare. It doesn’t quite get into the heart of the main character, but it that’s one of its strengths. It gets you close enough to J.B. Books to feel like you’re truly seeing the man’s final days, but there is a distance, too, which mirrors the relationships the character builds in his final days. There is promise for what might have been had the characters had time to know each other better. You believe there could have been a love story between Books and Bond, but his imminent death takes away that possibility. There is also Gillom, Bond’s son, who’s recently lost his father, and who begins to look up to Books like he might become a father figure to Gillom. But when Gillom discovers Books is dying, he loses what might be his one shot at redemption (he is a fairly despicable character) and becomes very much like the unredeemed Books himself. There is a hard irony in the author’s treatment of this relationship, and the writing masterfully draws it out, subtly. If you miss a sentence or two along the way, you miss a lot of what’s going on.

It’s a quick and satisfying read. However, the book itself is put together with small print and very large margins. You get the idea it’s a longer book than it is. Still, I found it immensely satisfying to read a novel of this depth, though it was over quickly indeed. Bottom line: The Shootist is a fine story that’s wonderfully written. Very satisfying, unless you prefer happy or even hopeful endings.
Ramsey`s
Just one of the best books I've read in decades. The story transcends the classic western with running commentary of the greed of society. A story that just is so original and can't go wrong. Deals with the human condition and the need for nostalgia, heroes, and the challenges of transitioning into a new age. I think Clint Eastwood took this book and modernized it in a sense to make the movie "The Gran Torino."
Conjulhala
Fan-Tastic! Easily one of the best Western novels I've ever read. More than that, it's among some of the best novels of any genre I've ever read. The story is very engrossing, and the protagonist develops greatly throughout the tale, while holding to his core values. Judging the story as simply a man facing his own mortality, it excels. Considered with the context of the plot, it's out of the park. I absolutely would recommend this to anyone.
Ieregr
My favorite John Wayne movie and always wanted to read the book. A fine read and now I have to get the son's book to find out what happened to that irritating Rogers kid!
Minha
The Shootist provides an intense and unique perspective on the fleeting time period known as the "old west" toward the end of that era. The protagonist is an aging gunslinger (or shootist), suffering from and debilitated by prostate cancer. Having journeyed to El Paso in hopes that a doctor who treated him long ago can pull him through, J.B. Books' hopes are dashed by a prognosis of continuing and increasing pain and and an agonizing death. The only solace the doctor can offer is morphine to dull the pain, and that steadily loses effect through the course of the story. The last days of this once indomitable figure seem to parallel the dying days of the old west as both witness the coming of the 20th century, progress, and civilization. There is no sentimentality, bravado, or heroism in this book - nothing to admire and much to pity. An excellent story, wonderfully written, for those who prefer no sugar-coating on their slice of life.
Beardana
I enjoy reading westerns and western movies. I've enjoyed watching The Shootist starring John Wayne many times.
I prefer the movie version because I do not care for Swarthout's writing style. I prefer the sub-plots in the book but the writing style diminishes the overall story.

I prefer western writers such as Larry McMurtry and Cormac McCarthy.
A great book, but add it to list of those where the movie at least as good. The intro by Swarthout's son nicely describes the reasons for the film differing from the novel. They were all smart, artistic decisions.
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