» » The White People and Other Stories: Vol. 2 of the Best Weird Tales of Arthur Machen (Call of Cthulhu Fiction)

Fb2 The White People and Other Stories: Vol. 2 of the Best Weird Tales of Arthur Machen (Call of Cthulhu Fiction) ePub

by S. T. Joshi,Arthur Machen

Category: Genre Fiction
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: S. T. Joshi,Arthur Machen
ISBN: 1568821727
ISBN13: 978-1568821726
Language: English
Publisher: Chaosium Inc.; 1st edition (May 1, 2003)
Pages: 292
Fb2 eBook: 1550 kb
ePub eBook: 1951 kb
Digital formats: lrf mbr txt mobi

The White People, one of the most celebrated tales in the genre, is a girl’s testimony . The Bowmen and Other Legends of the War is a diminutive pack of four World War I tales peppered with modern-day battleground miracles to encourage the British in their conflict with the wicked Germans.

The White People, one of the most celebrated tales in the genre, is a girl’s testimony sandwiched between a dry scholarly disputation; I suspect that the bulk of readers will value the meat of this sandwich far more than the bread, although it is in the bread that one can most clearly discern the point of the story. They are unpalatably jingoistic, cheesy, and unimaginative, and Machen seems out of his element in the colloquial dialogue of the soldiers.

Arthur Machen had a profound impact upon . Lovecraft and the group of stories that would later become known as the Cthulhu Mythos. This first volume of Chaosium's Arthur Machen collection begins with the chilling "The Three Impostors" in its complete form.

Classic tales of the fantastic, creepy and weird, with a foreword from Guillermo Del Toro Machen's weird . With more than 1,700titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines.

Classic tales of the fantastic, creepy and weird, with a foreword from Guillermo Del Toro Machen's weird tales of the creepy and fantastic finally come to Penguin Classics. With an introduction from . The title story "The White People" is an exercise in the bizarre leaving the reader disoriented and on edge.

The Call of Cthulhu describes tribal peoples as being mix-blooded. This is just creepy, as most humans do not describe others the same way you would describe a dog. This technique would be effective if it was coming out of the mouth of a character who was meant to be portrayed as inhuman or emotionless, but no, it’s coming out of the narrator we’re supposed to identify with. It has every story of his I’ve heard anyone talk about, the painting on the cover is cool, and Penguin crams all 420 pages into a surprisingly thin width.

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ARTHUR MACHEN (Arthur Llewelyn Jones), a Welsh author of. .

ARTHUR MACHEN (Arthur Llewelyn Jones), a Welsh author of supernatural, fantasy, and horror fiction, was born on March 3, 1863. He grew up in Caerleon, Monmouthshire, and attended boarding school at Hereford Cathedral School. Summary: Machen’s weird tales of the creepy and fantastic finally come to Penguin Classics. At the same time, the best weird writers understood that supernatural motifs could serve as metaphors for the expression of truths about the human condition (the vampire as social outsider, for example) in a more vivid and pungent manner than in conventional mimetic realism.

Электронная книга "The White People and Other Weird Stories", Arthur Machen. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The White People and Other Weird Stories" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

It was released in October 1999 and is still in print. The volume is named for the Lovecraft short story, "The Call of Cthulhu".

Machen's weird tales of the creepy and fantastic finally come to Penguin Classics. The title story "The White People" is an exercise in the bizarre leaving the reader disoriented and on edge

Call of Cthulhu Fiction. Arthur Machen had a profound impact upon . 10% off. The White People and Other Stories.

Call of Cthulhu Fiction. This first volume of Chaosium's Arthur Machen collection begins with the chilling "The Three Impostors" in its complete form, including the rarely seen sections "The Decorative Imagination" and "The Novel of the Iron Maid. Rounding out the first volume are "The Great God Pan, " "The Inmost Light, " and "The Shining Pyramid.

Born in Wales in 1863, Machen was a London journalist for much of his life.Among his fiction, he may be best known for the allusive, haunting title story of this book, &"The White People", which H.P. Lovecraft thought to be the second greatest horror story ever written (after Blackwood's "The Wilows"). This wide ranging collection also includes the crystalline novelette "A Fragment of Life", & "The Angel of Mons" (a story so widely reported that it was imagined true by millions in the grim initial days of the Great War), and "The Great Return" telling of the stately visions which graced the Welsh village of Llantristant for a time. Four more tales and the poetical "Ornaments in Jade" are all finely told. This is the second Machen volume edited by S. T. Joshi and published by Chaosium. The first volume was The Three Impostors.
Comments to eBook The White People and Other Stories: Vol. 2 of the Best Weird Tales of Arthur Machen (Call of Cthulhu Fiction)
Coron
Having had a taste of Machen in the first volume of this three-volume collection by Chaosium Books, I was not disinclined to sample further, but my eagerness had abated. This collection did much to stoke the eagerness anew, although certain selections were very firmly not to my taste. I am willing to grant that my taste is by no means a universal standard, of course, but it is very sensibly the standard to which I apply my reading materials.

The first tale in this the second volume is “The Red Hand”, which once again stars the duo who dominated the first volume of tales, Dyson the man of letters and Phillips the man of science. The dispute over the nature of reality found in previous works is continued, and the dreamer Dyson proves to be more correct than the sceptical Phillips as the two unravel a supernatural mystery together. Biased as I am in favour of dreamers and against sceptics, I was satisfied with this outcome, and award the tale four stars.

“Ornaments in Jade”, the next item in the collection, is a series of very short stories given the questionable designation of “prose-poems” by the series editor, the most reverend (if irreverent) S. T. Joshi. Certainly they have “a style of impeccable fluidity, elegance, and, above all, sincerity”, as Joshi puts it – Machen is a master wordsmith on the order of M. R. James and Algernon Blackwood, at times approaching the sheer ambrosia of Mervyn Peake – but style does not constitute all in a piece of writing. Some of the short pieces hit the mark breathtakingly; others miss it and fall limply with the scent of faded camellia. Three stars overall, four in a generous mood.

“The White People”, one of the most celebrated tales in the genre, is a girl’s testimony sandwiched between a dry scholarly disputation; I suspect that the bulk of readers will value the meat of this sandwich far more than the bread, although it is in the bread that one can most clearly discern “the point” of the story. (I am amused by the frequency with which Machen, a man with an antisecular, antiscientific, poetical-mystical worldview so similar to my own, manages to overdo his didactic urge and nettle such an intensely sympathetic reader!) The sublime horror of this story lies in the fact that we know the girl is being initiated into a sinister witch-cult, but she does not. Five stars.

A Fragment of Life is a short novel that exists on the edges of the weird and details the gradual awakening of a rather humdrum middle-class couple, the Darnells, to the native wonder of the world, obscured by the grey quality of life in Edwardian London. Though not to everyone’s taste, this “dreamist” rather than “realist” novel records a true picture of life as both mundane and strange, petty and supremely meaningful. I grant it five stars.

The Bowmen and Other Legends of the War is a diminutive pack of four World War I tales peppered with modern-day battleground miracles to encourage the British in their conflict with the wicked Germans. They are unpalatably jingoistic, cheesy, and unimaginative, and Machen seems out of his element in the colloquial dialogue of the soldiers. One star, although stalwart British veterans will surely take offense at such a low evaluation. This is followed by “The Great Return” and “Out of the Earth”, two moralistic, religiously motivated tales; the first attempts to paint a glorious picture of life in Wales if the Holy Grail were ever rediscovered, and the second criticizes a nation that has forgotten God and godliness. The final story in this collection (there’s one more I’ll come back to), “The Happy Children”, is also a faith-driven account of the miraculous. The concepts are interesting, but somehow not as compelling as other of Machen’s more didactic fictions. Three stars to each.

“The Coming of the Terror,” a short story abridged from an earlier novel “with a skill that was really remarkable”, as Joshi quotes Machen as saying, is easily the most frightening work from Machen that I have yet read. A steadily mounting series of murders terrifies the local people until the cause subsides, fortunately after the source of the grisly and diverse killing spree is revealed. Machen’s speculations as to the ultimate cause of the slayings are fascinating to ponder. Five stars.

Chaosium Books is an excellent publisher specializing in literature of the supernatural, especially the works of H. P. Lovecraft and those who inspired or imitated his creations. S. T. Joshi’s introduction is highly to be praised, although owing to his avowedly secular worldview he comes to opposite conclusions than I do about certain works (for instance, he considers the closing speculations of Machen in “The Coming of the Terror” to be “lame”). The inner and outer text and cover illustration all satisfy immensely. Hurrah for Chaosium––and they even have an epic dragon logo.

Lovers of the late Victorian and Edwardian periods, those who find the mystic amongst the everyday, and those who enjoy scaring themselves by reading finely crafted and elegantly narrated tales of the supernatural will all converge with great expectations for this three-volume story collection.
lets go baby
I was vary impressed by Chaosium's first collection of Machen's work, which was THE THREE IMPOSTERS AND OTHER STORIES. "The Three Imposters" was a narrative of interwoven tales describing a paranoid man's encounter with three people who are not who they seem. Each is an excellent story in its own right, but the whole is greater than the sum. Considering the success of the first volume, I decided to try the second.

If you don't know Arthur Machen, he wrote "weird" stories in the late Victorian - Edwardian period. They all have a distinctly British flavor that reminds me of M.R. James. Most of his stories are set in his homeland of Wales, where something of charm and magic remains beneath the hills. By necessity he began to write for a newspaper later in life, and a fictional account he wrote for the paper on spectral guardians for British troops in WWI became the "Angel of Mons" stories you can still read about today.

THE WHITE PEOPLE AND OTHER STORIES is an eclectic collection of Machen's weird stories, his poetry, and some of his later writings for newspapers. Despite being a fan of Lovecraft, I have always wondered what HPL meant when he consistently referred to a protagonist hinting at things unknown (to others), dropping outlandish names and meaning more than is said. Well, he borrowed this technique from Machen's "The White People", a story made to look like a young girl's diary. Her journal is just a collection of thoughts and experiences, and many things are hinted at as reminders to herself which we will never understand, but these brief glimpses are horrible enough. Machen's poetry collection, "Ornaments in Jade", also struck me as weirdly beautiful but also indecipherable. More is unsaid than said, hinted at than revealed. I felt that it relied on some code, a common frame of reference, that has been lost over the course of a hundred years. Perhaps his contemporaries felt the same way.

There are other interesting compositions in this volume. "The Red Hand" brings back the investigating protagonists from "The Three Imposters," with a not-too-dissimilar plotline. "A Fragment of Life" seemed to be a glimpse into the everday life from a time long ago. It is almost novel length and simply describes the common affairs of a couple in turn-of-the-century London. If this sounds uninteresting, you'll have to read for yourself how a masterful author makes common situations uncommon. Finally, there are a series of stories written from Machen's journalistic days. Besides a group that are all related to the "Angel of Mons" category, there are a few others that describe other supernatural phenomena and are written in the first-person. They are so straight-forward and sincere that sometimes it is difficult to remember they are meant to be fiction.

Machen's overarching theme is that the material, everday world is merely a shadow of reality and that true living must penetrate that shadow to see the glories beyond. This is something he truly believed and it is evident in all of his stories. The reason these stories continue to frighten and thrill is that we desire to see what is beyond the veil, but we are also afraid of what we will find.
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