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Fb2 The Painting ePub

by Nina Schuyler

Category: Genre Fiction
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Nina Schuyler
ISBN: 1565124413
ISBN13: 978-1565124417
Language: English
Publisher: Algonquin Books (October 22, 2004)
Pages: 312
Fb2 eBook: 1799 kb
ePub eBook: 1703 kb
Digital formats: lrf azw doc lit

Every so often, you start a novel that you can't put down; Schuyler's debut is such a book. Set in the 1870s, it drops readers into two parallel worlds, that of Ayoshi, a 26-year-old Japanese artist.

Every so often, you start a novel that you can't put down; Schuyler's debut is such a book.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In 1869 Japan, a young woman escapes the confines of her arranged marriage by painting memories of her lover on mulberry paper. She secretly wraps the painting around a ceramic pot that's bound for Europe.

Schuyler writes with piercing intelligence and real insight into the complex worlds of literary translation and human relationships. In France, a disenchanted young man works as a clerk at an import shop. When he opens the box from Japan, he discovers the brilliant watercolor of two lovers locked in an embrace under a plum tree.

Read The Painting, by Nina Schuyler online on Bookmate – In 1869 Japan, a young woman escapes the confines of her arranged marriage by painting memories of her lover on mulberry paper. Give a Bookmate subscription →. About Bookmate.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. She secretly wraps the painting around a ceramic pot that's bound for Europe

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No, says Jorgen, gripping the bag to his side. You can take my overcoat, says Svensk, handing it to the butler, a tall man with thinning brown hair. hallway, enclosed in the jingle of voices. A burst of laughter comes from the first room. White marble tile lines the hallway and a huge chandelier scatters fragments of color on the pale yellow walls. There is the distinct smell of meat cooking-chicken or beef, Jorgen isn’t sure

Schuyler writes with piercing intelligence and real insight into the complex worlds of literary translation and human relationships. Winner of the 2014 Next Generation Indie Book Award for GENERAL Fiction. A San Francisco Chronicle 100 Recommended Books of 2013. Ellen Sussman, author of the New York Times bestselling novel, French Lessons, and the forthcoming novel, The Paradise Guest House. You’ll be thankful you followed.

In 1869 Japan, a young woman escapes the confines of her arranged marriage by painting memories of her lover on mulberry paper. When he opens the box from Japan, he discovers the brilliant watercolor of two lovers locked in a In 1869 Japan, a young woman escapes the confines of her arranged marriage by painting memories of her lover on mulberry paper.

The painting : a novel. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. by. Schuyler, Nina, 1963-. Art, Women painters, Married women, Adultery, Painting. Gutierres on July 28, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

In 1869 Japan, a young woman escapes the confines of her arranged marriage by painting memories of her lover on mulberry paper. She secretly wraps the painting around a ceramic pot that's bound for Europe. In France, a disenchanted young man works as a clerk at an import shop. When he opens the box from Japan, he discovers the brilliant watercolor of two lovers locked in an embrace under a plum tree. He steals the painting and hides it in his room. With each viewing, he sees something different, and gradually the painting transforms him.Set outside the new capital of Tokyo during the Meiji Restoration and in Paris during the Franco-Prussian War, The Painting is a richly imagined story of four characters whose lives are delicately and powerfully entwined: Ayoshi, the painter, pines for her lover as she dutifully attends to her husband; Ayoshi's husband, Hayashi, a government official who's been disfigured in a deadly fire, has his own well of secret yearnings; Jorgen, wounded by the war and by life, buries himself in work at the Paris shop; and the shop owner's sister, Natalia, who shows Jorgen the true message of the painting.Exquisitely written and utterly spellbinding, The Painting reveals the enduring effect of art in ordinary life and marks the debut of a skilled stylist and first-rate storyteller.
Comments to eBook The Painting
Kulalbine
Having read and loved Schuyler's "The Translator" I couldn't wait to read another of her books. However, this one was a great disappointment and had I read it first I would have dismissed her as a mediocre writer.

Basically the problem is bad characterisation. Without a character that one can care about no work of art can succeed. You may hate the characters or love them but you need to feel involved with them and in this book there is no one who truly draws you in.

In the French section most of the characters are all fairly disgusting -- including the main one-legged protagonist who appears to be regenerated into a caring person from the painting -- but his change is not authentic and the happily ever after ending is absolutely absurd and goes into surrealism. The characters in the Japanese location are more sympathetic but there is no feeling of resolution, and one reaches the end of the novel with relief as to having got most of these weak, indecisive or disgusting characters out of the way.

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Dordred
This is probably one of the best books I've read this year. Beautifully written, sensual, detailed and compelling. The story shifts between Japan and France in the late 19th Century drawing the reading into these two worlds and the characters lives. For the first time in a long time I was wondering and guessing at the developing storyline. Something so lacking in todays formula, cookie cutter publishing world.

I highly recommend this novel and look forward to the next.
Kakashkaliandiia
I was very disappointed in this book. After all the reviews I was so looking forward to it. I enjoy novels that have seemingly disconnected parts and characters that intertwine in some way. All that kept me reading was the hope it would get better at some point since I was particularly interested in the events occurring during the time period in which it was set.
Wymefw
Even though I enjoyed reading this and I liked the concept, I found some anachronisms that made me grit my teeth. If you can suspend your disbelief and get over the small stuff, you might enjoy this more than I did.
Rocksmith
Schuyler has a wonderful skill at taking us in to another time and culture. Add to that her clear and compelling prose and you've got a great read.
Friert
I realize the setting of the story was during a war although the characters were not directly involved in it. The plot was realistic yet very dreary and dismal.
Blackredeemer
Reflective book - very satisfying. Pace deliberate.
Hayashi has feared fire ever since fire took the lives of his family and permanently disfigured his feet. A talented potter who was raised by Buddhist monks, he is a part of the new Japanese government, even though his heart isn't completely into it. He keeps the now-illegal Buddhist shrine on his property open, even though someone set fire to his teahouse, possibly as a warning. Similarly, he can't make out what's going on in the mind of his beautiful young wife, Ayoshi.

Ayoshi is dreamy, sometimes spending hours upon hours painting things she rarely lets him see. She feels a great distance between herself and the man the matchmaker married her to. Though she feels bad about it, she resents his deformity, the fact that she has to massage his feet while soaking them in ice water to calm their pain. She cannot find space for him in her heart --- it is too full with the desire to paint the world she sees, especially the memories of her beautiful lover, who she misses deeply. When she paints the first painting, the passion of her muse pours perfectly out into the paper, capturing a moment of lust and profound love and joy. She cannot let her husband see this work, so she wraps it around one of the pots he has sold and is sending to France.

In France, Jorgen is the one who discovers the painting. Once a solider hired from his homeland of Denmark to fight in the place of a rich Frenchman, the loss of his leg has forced him to leave the army he feels so much at home in. He happened to be billeted in the hospital next to a young man whose sister, Natalia, visited constantly, and, in return for a small act of kindness on Jorgen's part, she has convinced her other brother to hire him to sort and unpack things in his warehouse. She also convinces him to help her learn how to shoot and be a real solider, for Natalia's one desire is to be a truly good person, a hero, someone who, along with the other women who are training to become soldiers, fights for her homeland.

The painting is, in many ways, the pivotal event of the story. It is love and desire melted and pressed to paper, a form of release for a trapped young woman, a tool for healing for a similarly trapped man. Every time he looks at the painting, Jorgen sees something new; it is not that the painting is magic (though beauty and the capturing of a perfect moment has a magic all its own), but that Jorgen changes. As he transforms, falling in love with the almost saintly Natalia, he becomes a better person and is able to see different things. Natalia also changes as she faces loss and sees the realities of war. The way she and her fellow female soldiers are treated isn't what she expected, but strangely enough, she still finds a sort of liberation. Ayoshi and Hayashi also change; Hayashi's struggles to understand and try to find a common place with his wife are heartbreaking, as are Ayoshi's attempts to find herself.

THE PAINTING is extremely well written. Nina Schuyler uses imagery to create subtle connections in the text. For instance, Hayashi, Ayoshi and a visitor see an owl. What each sees defines them perfectly. Hayashi sees, poetically, a slice of moonlight. Sato, who travels the world, sees an adventurer. Ayoshi says that none of them are right --- that the owl (she) is lost.

Schuyler also captures the heart of a city under siege. The Prussians are closing in on Paris, and the author brings us a picture of a place filled both with desperation and optimism, stripped of its facade. Pierre, the man who Jorgen works for, is only happy when he's squeezing the last penny from his clients, Jorgen himself runs minor cons to make money, and we see the realities --- the insides of the hospitals, the funerals, the doubts and the desperation that everyone feels as they prepare to defend their homes against a vastly impressive force.

Contrasting love against hopelessness --- a floundering marriage, a war --- THE PAINTING shows how love can heal and liberate the soul.

--- Reviewed by Cindy Lynn Speer
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