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Fb2 The Dawn Country (People of the Longhouse, Book 2) ePub

by W. Michael Gear,Kathleen O'Neal Gear

Category: Genre Fiction
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: W. Michael Gear,Kathleen O'Neal Gear
ISBN: 0765359804
ISBN13: 978-0765359803
Language: English
Publisher: Tor Books (November 29, 2011)
Fb2 eBook: 1327 kb
ePub eBook: 1304 kb
Digital formats: docx txt mobi doc

The Dawn Country" a historical novel by Kathleen O'neal Gear and W. Michael Gear is an important addition to a topic all too infrequently presented, North American Pre-history.

The Dawn Country" a historical novel by Kathleen O'neal Gear and W. This story tells of pre-colonial American Iroquois during and following a massive raid of evil renegades against more settled tribes with the intent to rape, pillage, and especially to steal children to sell and/or trade for goods

The Dawn Country: Book Two of the People of the Longhouse. This paperback book shows normal wear and tear. This paperback book cover has stickers/sticker residue on it.

The Dawn Country: Book Two of the People of the Longhouse.

The Dawn Country book. The epic tale that began in People of the Longhouse continues in this second book of the thrilling new Iroquois quartet by New York Times and USA Today bestselling authors and archaeologists Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear.

In this third book of the People of the Longhouse quartet, dangerous sorcerer Atotarho sets into motion a. .Both longtime fans and newcomers will be satisfied. Another fine entry in an ambitious, long-running series.

In this third book of the People of the Longhouse quartet, dangerous sorcerer Atotarho sets into motion a cataclysmic battle that threatens to destroy the Iroquoian world.

Books by W. Michael Gear & Kathleen O'Neal Gear from Tom Doherty Associates the first north americans . A tom doherty associates book

Books by W. Michael Gear & Kathleen O'Neal Gear from Tom Doherty Associates the first north americans series. People of the Fire People of the Earth. People of the Sea. People of the Lakes. People of the Lightning. People of the Silence. A tom doherty associates book. NEW YORK NOTE: If you purchased this book without a cover you should be aware that this book is stolen property. It was reported as "unsold and. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63.

Book Two of the People of the Longhouse Series. North America's Forgotten Past. Kathleen O'Neal Gear is a former state historian and archaeologist for Wyoming, Kansas, and Nebraska for the . Department of the Interior. Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. She has twice received the federal government's Special Achievement Award for ""outstanding management"" of our nation's cultural heritage. W. Michael Gear holds a master's degree in archaeology and has worked as a professional archaeologist since 1978. He is principal investigator for Wind River Archaeological Consultants.

Gear, Kathleen O'Neal; Gear, W. Michael. A Tom Doherty Associates book for the children and they have allies: a battle-weary Mohawk war chief and a Healer from the People of th. Includes bibliographical references (p. -300). Young Wrass, still being held captive, along with several other children, in Gannajero's camp, organizes the children for an assault on Gannajero's warriors. Meanwhile Koracoo and Gonda are coming for the children and they have allies: a battle-weary Mohawk war chief and a Healer from the People of the Dawnland.

William Michael Gear (1955) is an American author. People Books - First North Americans (with Kathleen O'Neal Gear). People of the Longhouse (2010). The Dawn Country (2011). The Broken Land (2012). People of the Black Sun (2012). He was born in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He is best known for his North America's Forgotten Past series, co-authored with Kathleen O'Neal Gear, about North American prehistory. 1979) from Colorado State University. People of the Wolf (1990). People of the Fire (1990). People of the Earth (1992).

The epic tale that began in People of the Longhouse continues in this second book of the thrilling new Iroquois quartet.

Gear and Gear Books, W Michael Gear, Kathleen Gear, co-authors, award winning book writers. At its pinnacle in A. 1150 the Anasazi empire of the Southwest would see no equal in North America for almost eight hundred years. The epic tale that began in People of the Longhouse continues in this second book of the thrilling new Iroquois quartet. What others are saying.

The epic tale that began in People of the Longhouse continues in this second book of the thrilling new Iroquois quartet by New York Times and USA Today bestselling authors and archaeologists Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear.

War Chief Koracoo and Deputy Gonda of the Standing Stone People have successfully rescued their children, Odion and Tutelo, from Gannajero the Trader. Known as the Crow, Gannajero is a figure out of nightmare―a witch who steals children. Odion's friend Wrass is still held captive, along with several other children, in Gannajero's camp, and Koracoo and Gonda are determined to save them all.

This time, Koracoo and Gonda have allies: a battle-weary Mohawk war chief and a Healer from the People of the Dawnland, who have also lost children to Gannajero. These bitter enemies must learn to trust each other and find common ground. Will they be able to put their differences aside and rescue the children before they are sold and carried off to distant villages―and lost to their families and homes forever?

With their trademark mastery of American prehistory, Kathleen and Michael Gear tell a very human story of love and courage set against the backdrop of violent and endemic warfare of the Iroquois nations prior to the founding of the League of the Iroquois.

Comments to eBook The Dawn Country (People of the Longhouse, Book 2)
NI_Rak
I have to do my review covering two books - "People of the Long House" and "The Dawn Country" because, to be honest, it really feels like they should have been published together as one story (who knows? maybe there were publication deadlines or something). Regardless, they really feel like they were split in the middle and I can't see a reader getting much satisfaction out of reading just one or the other.

That said, there are a lot of things I like about these two books. I like the idea of historical background and the clear research that went into them (even includes a list of sources) and I like to see books about the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois). I like that the writing is crisp and the action cooks along at a great pace. These are fun books to read.

The authors do a great job of showing the similarities between the tribes and in building an undercurrent of information that should lead to the Hiawatha/Dekanawida/Tree of Peace confederation story that I imagine is what the next several books will cover. At that point though, I do have some issues with the "history". According to the description of book 3 (to be fair, I haven't read it), the two boys (Wrass and Odion) become Dekanawida and Hiawatha and establish the whole confederacy and such. From what I recall historically, they were from different tribes and I don't recall either of them being kidnapped and sexually abused by other men. I would imagine this kind of depiction of the founders of the confederacy (and of Dekanawida being presented as such a weak sniveling boy) would come across as quite an insult to Haudenosunee people. On a purely editorial level, I really disliked how they used a different font (a sans seriff font) for all of Odion's chapters - it's a weak technique that detracts from the reading.

Beyond that,I also didn't like is that there never really seemed to be much depth in any of the characters and by the end, not much has really been worked out. We get very superficial impressions of everyone and, partly because of the nature of the action, never really get to see development beyond that. That their group picks up members from other tribes along the way seems to only serve to introduce those tribes to set up later unification. The characters don't develop much nor do they really help the plot. Both books really describe one long chase, with very little given to the aftermath or the setup of the chase. I think there were a lot of routes that could have been chosen to highlight the village culture, the similarities/differences between the tribes, and work out issues that each character had. Instead, it is a chase, with some cardboard characters and a flat finale.

Basically, if you have an interest in the Haudenosaunee and early Native American history with a big dose of action and a stretching of historicaly foundations, you may well enjoy this. Don't look for much depth and make sure you read both books. I enjoyed them overall (and I have read books by these authors before), but will NOT look for future books in the series. I can't see those two boys becoming the famous founders in any way - too much liberty was taken in their presentation.
Tar
The Dawn Country, Kathleen O'Neal Gear & W. Michael Gear
Four Stars. North American Pre-history

"The Dawn Country" a historical novel by Kathleen O'neal Gear and W. Michael Gear is an important addition to a topic all too infrequently presented, North American Pre-history. This story tells of pre-colonial American Iroquois during and following a massive raid of evil renegades against more settled tribes with the intent to rape, pillage, and especially to steal children to sell and/or trade for goods. The book is well larded with the folk lore and customs of several tribes, their spiritual beliefs, herbal remedies, wars and war materials, matriarchy/patriarchy customs and notions of gender. All of this is enabled by the Gears' awesome knowledge as a professional archeologist and anthropologist team.

"The Dawn Country" is a suspense-thriller involving the loss and recovery of children stolen during a massacre and burning of an entire village by a gang of renegades directed by a woman chief known for her brutality and cruelty toward all those who oppose her. As the tale is spun out, we learn more than most of us want to know about the cruelty of man against man and children.

The suspense and tension of the plot is the effort of family and fellow tribespersons attempting to rescue children stolen in a raid where we are privy to the battle of the raid as well as the process of buying and selling slaves, in particular children. There, we also see the ugliness of torture and cruelty, the worst of which may well be skinning and preserving human flesh.

As but one example of these authors' control of language to create on-the-edge-of-your-seat, nail-biting, can't-put-it-down tension, the following passage says it all. No contemporary writer of thrillers does it better than this:

"Then Cord faded back across the leaf mat to the shadowy well behind a maple trunk and waited, listening. His four summers as a war chief and ten summers as a warrior before that, had trained him well. He could smell peril; the forest stank of it. The silver brightness of the moonlight winking from the snow made the stillness all the more ominous. But he had the odd sense that this man was not the source of it. Something else was out here with them, and it breathed the darkness like a hunting bear."

The Dawn Country" is an entertaining read. All the same, I have some question about the authors' cardboard characterizations wherein the good guys are always good and the bad guys invariably bad without being led to understand how they became what they are. Another problem I found distracting is the introduction of contemporary colloquial language in a pre-history setting, e.g. "back-pedaled," "bad mouthed," etc. Such slips snatch the reader from the setting and for some time destroy the mood established. Still, despite gaffs like that and the underdeveloped characters, I wholehearted recommend this book as an entertaining read.
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