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Fb2 The Center of Everything ePub

by Laura Moriarty

Category: Contemporary
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Laura Moriarty
ISBN: 0786255633
ISBN13: 978-0786255634
Language: English
Publisher: Thorndike Press; 1 edition (October 2, 2003)
Pages: 610
Fb2 eBook: 1969 kb
ePub eBook: 1798 kb
Digital formats: rtf txt lrf lit

Set in Kerrville, Kansas, The Center of Everything is told by Evelyn Bucknow, an endearing character with a wholly refreshing way of looking at the world. Living with her single mother in a small apartment, Evelyn Bucknow is a young girl wincing her way through adolescence.

Set in Kerrville, Kansas, The Center of Everything is told by Evelyn Bucknow, an endearing character with a wholly refreshing way of looking at the world. With a voice that is as charming as it is recognizable, Evelyn immerses the reader in the dramas of an entire community.

The Center of Everything. But she’s going to vote for him anyway, because she says he’s the one person who can maybe make everything right again and he’s not afraid of the Communists. Really, she says, the grand finale is coming one way or another, through him or through somebody else. The important thing is to be ready.

Laura Moriarty is the kind of writer that should be watched: she will certainly produce a major novel sooner or later. The Center of Everything follows the main character Evelyn from ten to her late teens in small town Kansas. She lives with her unmarried mother and then later her mentally handicapped brother while also spending a lot of time with her fundamentalist grandmother and her two best friends Travis and Deena.

Laura Moriarty's debut novel is a simple story, but effectively told. Ten-year-old Evelyn Bucknow lives with her not very responsible young mother, Tina, on the outskirts of a small Kansas town. The Center of Everything follows a clean arc: How Evelyn, a gifted but poor student, negotiates the pitfalls of her background to become a college student. The book shows the scary tenuousness of poverty. When Tina's car breaks down, their life falls apart like a flimsy cardboard edifice

Laura Moriarty (born December 24, 1970, Honolulu, Hawaii) is an American novelist. Laura Moriarty was born in Honolulu in 1970. She earned a degree in social work before earning an . in Creative Writing at the University of Kansas

Laura Moriarty (born December 24, 1970, Honolulu, Hawaii) is an American novelist. in Creative Writing at the University of Kansas. She was the recipient of the George Bennett Fellowship for Creative Writing at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. Moriarty currently lives with her daughter in Lawrence, Kansas, and is at work on her next novel.

The Center of Everything book.

But I guess Mrs. Rowley doesn’t care. She’s got a job now, working the desk of a motel in town. I see her walking to it in the evenings, coming home in the morning. her eyes like a visor, and looks right into the rising sun. Ed Schwebbe comes out in his van every morning now to pick up Travis for school, and sometimes he comes at night too, just after Mrs. Rowley leaves for work. I don’t know where they go. If he sees me in my window, he waves quickly, and that’s it. It’s okay, though.

Laura Moriarty received her master's degree from the University of Kansas and was awarded the George Bennett Fellowship for Creative Writing at Phillips Exeter Academy. She is the author of The Center of Everything. She lives in Lawrence, Kansas. Библиографические данные. The Center of Everything: A Novel.

In Laura Moriarty's extraordinary first novel .

In Laura Moriarty's extraordinary first novel, a young girl tries to make sense of an unruly world spinning around her. Growing up with a single mother who is chronically out of work and dating a married man, 10-year old Evelyn Bucknow learns early how to fend for herself. About this Guide The following author biography, critical praise and list of questions about The Center of Everything, are intended as resources to aid individual readers and book groups who would like to learn more about the author and this novel.

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Evelyn Bucknow lives with her single mother, Tina, in a small apartment in Kansas. Though warm and loving, Tina is young, immature, and prone to hasty decisions that create a precarious financial situation for her increasingly anxious daughter. When a failed romance with her married boss leaves Tina jobless and desperate, Evelyn turns to her grandmother to distance herself from her mother's irresponsibility.
Comments to eBook The Center of Everything
Ynye
This book begins almost mid sentence into a daughter and mothers life- I loved both characters deeply. You know a book is excellent when you feel you REALLY know the characters - like they are people you've known in your actual life. Wow- right? This is the story of a deeply intellectual girl (Evelyn) - born into a socio economically challenging situation (think dirt poor) that she seems to tackle with a wry sense of humor as the author moves you through her childhood. The mother really spoke to me also- the authors exploration of her through the daughter perspective was thought provoking and insightful. While the daughter didn't always "get her"- you will. The author weaves in typical teenager angst of Evelyn juxtaposed with significant parental mistakes by Tina. And if you are a parent- you understand it is not something anyone is perfect at. But all along the way- I really loved Tina. I know I should have been mad, disappointed and unsympathetic - but I never was. At her core- and despite her circumstances, the mother was the character I most respected. Her challenges were insurmountable, her upbringing tough (unloving, judgmental father)- but she never faltered to me in being a strong parent. But this book- it is outstanding.
Welen
This is a perfectly executed "slice of life" novel, and the title is very apt: told from the point of view of a growing kid prettily named Evelyn (she is 10 at first, 17 at the end and ready to go to college). The world for her at first is where she lives: the center of everything. It also happens to be somewhere in the middle of America (Kansas). It involves "real Americans", blue-collar workers, white and (many of them) highly religious in an integralist way. This is where people believe in creationism and try to get the teaching of evolution banned from school.

By the end of the book, Evelyn has grown up, watching her mother who is a liberal at war with her environment (she goes through multiple crises in her life, including a fall-out with her father, being abandoned by her lover, finding herself on Social Security with a retarded baby). She watches her best school friends - the beautiful Deena and dashing Travis - go through equally harrowing growing-up crises.

That is perhaps why the book doesn't really work for me: the plot moves on and is definitely well-paced,but things happen to other people, not to Evelyn. She is a watcher - always on the outside, and she herself is certainly never the "center of everything". Perhaps this is what the author wanted to do: follow her protagonist through her growing up experience where everything bad or important is in one way or another happening to others and not herself.

But as a result, the plot doesn't quite "gel": all the threads don't come together to "shake" the protagonist (I mean Evelyn) out of her tracks:throughout, she remains wonderfully aloof and unscathed. A pity, because it is very well written, and the style (or "voice")cleverly evolves as the protagonist grows older, no small feat!

Laura Moriarty is the kind of writer that should be watched: she will certainly produce a major novel sooner or later. In the meantime, this is, in spite of its shortcomings, a must read!
Cerana
The Center of Everything follows the main character Evelyn from ten to her late teens in small town Kansas. She lives with her unmarried mother and then later her mentally handicapped brother while also spending a lot of time with her fundamentalist grandmother and her two best friends Travis and Deena.
The book's premise is a familiar one and lends itself toward a pedestrian trip over well-worn territory, but while there are some flat or awkward moments, for the most part Moriarty transcends the genre. The biggest reason for this is that the author's characters are fully three-dimensional, seemingly simple on the surface but much more complex in action and response. Deena as the pretty but not-too-bright girl; Travis as the warm-hearted juvenile delinquent; Eileen as the strict fundamentalist grandmother. All of these could easily have become caricature and to be honest, there were a few times they edged close, mostly in the beginning. Thankfully, Moriarty managed to skirt those dangers and allowed the characters to deepen as the book went on.
As for the two main characters, Evelyn and her mother, they stand out for the depth of their emotions and voices. The mother, Tina, deals with the scorn of both the town and her own father (shown in a wonderfully oblique fashion early on when Evelyn is too young and naive to recognize what she is reporting to the reader), the consequences of her own bad decisions, and the seeming hopelessness of her son's handicap. We see her warts and all and though sometimes we may want to shake her, you can't help but root for her through it all or feel for her in the worst moments.
The same is true for Evelyn, whose voice smoothly and winningly carries the novel. Moriarty's teens speak and think like teens and not like adults imagine them thinking, a refreshing change from too much stilted teen dialogue or bad slang in other coming-of-age books. And while Evelyn is of course more eloquent than the typical girl her age (it is a novel after all), the disconnect is rarely if ever distracting. There are some just beautifully painful teen scenes in this book, such as the moment when Evelyn realizes the boy she like is attracted to Deena. Moriarty captures this time of life vividly and realistically.
Sometimes the historical context is a bit awkward--references to Reagan for instance or to the TV movie The Day After--, Moriarty uses them to make connections or insights that are probably best made through the characters themselves rather than set pieces like these, but these are small flaws in a book that endears the reader to its narrator and leaves you sorry to leave her behind.
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