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Fb2 The Ass's Tale (Unbearable Books / Autonomedia) ePub

by John Farris

Category: Contemporary
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: John Farris
ISBN: 1570272212
ISBN13: 978-1570272219
Language: English
Publisher: Autonomedia; First edition (July 15, 2010)
Pages: 208
Fb2 eBook: 1190 kb
ePub eBook: 1557 kb
Digital formats: mobi rtf lrf docx

Published July 15th 2010 by Autonomedia.

Published July 15th 2010 by Autonomedia. John Farris (1940–2016) was an American poet and novelist who lived in the East Village neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. Books by John Farris. Mor. rivia About The Ass's Tale.

Paperback, 208 pages. Published July 15th 2010 by Autonomedia.

Told in the existential down-and-dirty vein of Ralph Ellison, Ishmael Reed and Chester Himes, this book (in manuscript form) circulated through New York City's Lower East Side for years. John is a longtime denizen of the neighborhood; he still lives above the Bullet Space Fiction. Paperback, 208 pages.

John Farris John Farris. The United States is besieged by terrorists who are working from within the White House itself to overthrow the government.

A seemingly senseless murder at a New England ski resort leads to a confrontation between the forces of good and evil, precipitated by Zarach, a demonic, millenia-old spirit, in a Vermont courtroom. They have frightening weapons at their disposal, not the least of which are techniques of mind control undreamed of even a decade ago.

John Farris (1940–2016) was an American poet and novelist who lived in the East Village neighborhood in the New . ISBN 9780963740502) in 1993. He is the also author of the novel The Ass's Tale published Unbearable Books.

John Farris (1940–2016) was an American poet and novelist who lived in the East Village neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan. He is the author of a volume of verse It's not About Time which was published by Fly by Night Press. ISBN 9781570272219) Farris was a member of the rag tag literary collective "The Unbearables".

Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. Read instantly in your browser. by Steve Dalachinsky (Author), Arthur Kaye (Illustrator). John is a longtime denizen of the neighborhood; he still lives above the Bullet Space Gallery at 292 East Third Street.

Save bookmarks and read as many as you like. John Farris is the New York Times bestselling author of such classic thrillers as The Fury and Son of the Endless Night. A filmmaker, as well as a novelist, Farris is a seminal influence on many of our most highly regarded writers, including Stephen King. Sacrifice, a terrifying thriller, is a work of relentless suspense, complex characterization, and surprise after stunning surprise.

John Farris Senter Ministries. 193 followers · Public figure. 159 followers · Artist. 158 followers · Alternative & holistic health service. Green Oasis Community Garden & Gilbert's Sculpture Garden.

This collection of essays arises from the lively discussions in the Formation of the Book of Isaiah. Fred Alan Wolf's 'The Yoga of Time Travel (How the Mind Can Defeat Time)'. 36 MB·74,117 Downloads·New!

Told in the existential down-and-dirty vein of Ralph Ellison, Ishmael Reed and Chester Himes, this book (in manuscript form) circulated through New York City's Lower East Side for years. You might also be interested in. Futures: A Science Fiction Series.

Fiction. John Farris's THE ASS'S TALE is a Rabelaisian story of a dog's search for his identity. Told in the existential down-and-dirty vein of Ralph Ellison, Ishmael Reed and Chester Himes, this book (in manuscript form) circulated through New York City's Lower East Side for years. John is a longtime denizen of the neighborhood; he still lives above the Bullet Space Gallery at 292 East Third Street. "Hot dog! Dirty dog! If you ever wanted to know about invisible sex, check this out!"--Steve Cannon, author of Groove, Bang, and Jive Around and Director of Gathering of Tribes Gallery.
Comments to eBook The Ass's Tale (Unbearable Books / Autonomedia)
Thordira
I'm going to try to place John Farris's wonderful new novel, The Ass's
Tale, into an historical context. The literary tradition that John's book
belongs to is the encyclopedic novel; the one that Gravity's Rainbow,
Ulysses and The Invisible Man are all part of. One of the things these
books have in common is that they ignore traditional plotting -- the `he
did this, she did that' thing; it's besides the point. Encyclopedic novels
are trying to tell you a whole bunch of stuff about culture and history
at the same time -- there's so much important information that the author
is trying to pass on that sometimes one chapter leads into another that
goes in an entirely different direction from the one you just finished.
John's book is also in the classical mode, in that it looks back to the
Roman writers -- more specifically; to The Satyricon (his main character
is originally named `Petronius,' after the author of The Satyricon), but
even more so to Apuleius' The Golden Ass (`Petronius' changes his name
to `Apuleius' on page 11 in the novel).
Both Farris and Apuleius have a similar goal; they want to examine
human nature and catalogue what people do to each other, but to do that,
you have to look at them unblinkingly, and we all know what staring at
folks gets you; trashed, slapped and sometimes even shot. So if you're
going to be a sociologist of the depths of human behavior, you have to
be surreptitious, even sneaky, which unfortunately adds some distance
between you and your object of study. Which also means that your
conclusions may be somewhat suspect.
However, if you trick yourself out as an animal, you can get in good
and close, and see what's actually going on without arousing suspicion.
Apuleius does this by transforming his main character into an ass. John
turns his narrator into a dog -- which happens when he hears Elvis
Presley's `You Ain't Nuthin But A Hound Dog' on a car radio! And it's
in this form that John/Apuleius `checks things out' -- Attica, racism,
Harlem, the Village, and tons of sex. The result is a report on the
Human Condition in the form of an ur-novel; a classic book in the
great tradition.
Burgas
John Farris's The Ass's Tale is a pun. Meaning there are always two tales. The one tale Farris is obviously playing with is The Metamorphoses of Apuleius, or The Golden Ass, in which the narrator Lucius accidentally turns himself into an ass. In a DuBoisian turn of the screw, Farris tells of two tales--an ass's and a dog's. In Farris's tale, Petronius, renamed Lucius Apuleius, is turned by Elvis into a hound dog, hounded himself by the man, trying to look after his own black ass John. In the process, he lifts the veil on America's heroes and Uncle Sam--that is, the United States--that is, us.

Farris's America is a world of duplicity, overrun by Lucans (snakes) who can both save a dog's life in Attica and can steal a blind vet's gold. In this America, pop culture heroes like Elvis and Desi Arnaz work side-by-side with history's villains like Dr. Petoit and Edward Teller. Women have names like Woody and Peck. You can disguise yourself as your Wanted poster on Morton Street where everyone looks just as different as everyone else. A black ass passes for Red. In the punning and the doubling and duplicity, it all can get very complex and confusing. Confusion is indeed the name of the game.

At one point in the novel Uncle Sam asks Ras Tafari, Emperor Haille Selasi, to check on their rights in terms of their operations. The emperor pulls a quote from Genesis: "Let us go down and confuse them." The quote refers to the people building the Tower of Babel. The confusion specifically referred to is the problem of language. From the first page of the book, Lucius describes the dream of his Odyssey, "encountering strange tongues, odd voices coming at me from the radio." Indeed, the novel is one of strange tongues (klookamop and rreety-o-roony) and odd voices.

But it is this Babel that is precisely what makes reading The Ass's Tale so enjoyable. Roland Barthes writes, in The Pleasure of the Text, "The text of pleasure is a sanctioned Babel." The pleasures of Farris's Babel are manifold, from intertextual games to culturally allusive tickling. Describing the pleasure of reading in the erotic terms of his exhibit, Sade, Barthes locates the pleasure of reading in "breaks" and "collisions," in antipathies in contact, in the two-edged. "Neither culture nor its destruction is erotic," he writes, "It is the seam between them...their [the works of our modernity] value would proceed from their duplicity. By which it must be understood that they always have two edges." Farris takes his two-edged tail through America's duplicitous and multiplicitous voices, to some pleasingly powerful effects.

Until he himself becomes invisible, Lucius serves as seeing-eye dog to a blind man, a hard-working World War II vet from Harlem who gets duped out of his money by Lil' Eva and Uncle Sam himself. His is one of the odd voices we don't get often--and we know why. He can't see anyone about his problem, he has no voice, and drops out of the novel. The really odd voice, however, becomes the duplicitous Lil' Eva. We share Lucius's contempt for her in solidarity with the blind man, but at the end even Lil' Eva becomes pitiable, as, doped up and desperate for another shot, she futilely insists that she (a snake) is not a dog. Her final scene ends with Lucius, and the reader, feeling neither pity nor gladness. "It was a mess no matter which way you looked at it," Lucius says.

But what's so pleasurable about the mess? Like the pun, it doesn't matter which way you look at it, meaning you're at the seams. Barthes says that the pleasure is in the seams, and the ass is an anatomical seam. Bakhtin calls it "the face turned inside out." We don't get any big revelations, any huge unmasking--not of Uncle Sam, not of James Moody, not of Lucius. The pleasure we get is an ass's pleasure. Messy no matter which way you look at it. But the point is that you saw it. You've seen the ass in the face, and boy, what a tale!

Anitta Santiago, Brooklyn Rail, October 2010
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