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Fb2 Waiting for the Dark, Waiting for the Light ePub

by Ivan Klima,Paul Wilson

Category: Contemporary
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Ivan Klima,Paul Wilson
ISBN: 1862071012
ISBN13: 978-1862071018
Language: English
Publisher: Granta Books (August 31, 1998)
Pages: 240
Fb2 eBook: 1642 kb
ePub eBook: 1571 kb
Digital formats: lit azw lrf txt

Waiting for the Dark, Wa. .has been added to your Cart. The style of the work, as conveyed in an excellent translation by Paul Wilson, is plain and declarative, even as it creates the skewed alternate world of the "Film" segments.

Waiting for the Dark, Wa. Klima was once asked by Philip Roth (in an interview published in "The Spirit of Prague") if he was anxious about the loss of the oppressive conditions in which so many Czech and Slovak authors produced their best work (. the loss of a society in which so much was forbidden that the writer gained an exalted status as an.

He'd come back for the stranger in the morning. Paul Wilson, Toronto, August 1994. He started the car and drove out through the gates of the car park. Wedding guests are crowding through the open gate. Fuka, tall and thin, has on a slightly worn black suit.

The Great Library for all. The Internet Archive is a bargain, but we need your help. Klíma, Ivan; Wilson, Paul R. (Paul Robert), 1941-. All we need is the price of a paperback book to sustain a non-profit library the whole world depends on. We’re dedicated to reader privacy.

The setting of the Czech writer Ivan Klima's novel is the "Velvet Revolution" of 1989. His hero, Pavel, has adapted ("sold out"?) to the Party after an unsuccessful attempt to flee the country. A filmmaker, he is reduced to making propaganda films. Waiting For The Dark, Waiting For the Light tells the story of Pavel, a TV cameraman at the time of the collapse of communism in Czechoslovakia.

Ivan Klima, Paul Wilson

Ivan Klima, Paul Wilson. A New York Times Notable Book and a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year, Waiting for the Dark, Waiting for the Light is the story of Pavel, once a promising, award-winning documentary filmmaker, forced to survive under communism by working as a cameraman for the state-run television station. Now middle-aged, he dreams of one day making a film a searing portrait of his times that the authorities would never allow

Klima in the end shows characters at every level capable of betrayal and accommodation of the regime.

Klima in the end shows characters at every level capable of betrayal and accommodation of the regime. After the new government takes over, Pavel doesn't go off to make artistic films and doesn't go back to the woman he loves. Ivan Klima's book "Waiting for the Dark, Waiting for the Light" was a really interesting look at the fallout from the fall of the Communist regime in Prague. Set in the days before and after the Velvet Revolution, its narrator, Pavel, is going through a midlife crisis of sorts.

Электронная книга "Waiting for the Dark, Waiting for the Light: A Novel", Ivan Klíma. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Waiting for the Dark, Waiting for the Light: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Street Date: February 6, 2006. If the item details above aren’t accurate or complete, we want to know about it. Report incorrect product info. Trending Drama Books. Fences (Paperback) (August Wilson).

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tmu, čekání na světlo (1993; Waiting for the Dark, Waiting for the Light ), about a Czech cameraman floundering in the prosperity that follows oppression; and Ani svatí, ani andělé (2001; No Saints or Angels ), about cultural and personal havoc in contemporary Prague. Thank you for subscribing! Be on the lookout for your Britannica newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox.

Comments to eBook Waiting for the Dark, Waiting for the Light
Moogugore
See full review on our blog:

http://thereadersroom.org/2015/04/29/1001-book-review-waiting-for-the-dark-waiting-for-the-light/

An interesting and rather complex book set in Czechoslovakia during and after the velvet revolution of 1989. The protagonist, Pavel, is a middle-aged camera man who is living with his girlfriend, her son, and her ex-husband. As a young man, Pavel tried to escape his repressive regime but when we meet him, he is working for a state-run television network producing state sponsored propaganda news. In his spare time Pavel dreams about the movies he wants to make. The novel alternates between sections of Pavel’s real life and his life as imagined by the movies he wants to make.

Despite it’s rather complicated message, plot, and structure, it is a book that is easy to read and doesn’t feel overly dense (unlike many other Eastern European classics). I highly recommend this book, particularly for those readers who enjoy fiction with ties to political realities.
Clandratha
Transitions are difficult, equally so for individuals and societies. Pavel F. is a man who was born at just the right time or just the wrong time for a major transition; his fate is in the balance and there is no clear external weight or prop (neither faith nor hope nor charity) that he can use to swing that balance in the desired direction. His age is almost identical to that of the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic which enmeshes him like a spider's web. He is a professional film-maker, producing documentaries and news snippets in a system of censorship that is losing its own guidelines and signposts, sending him equivocal signals about what is permissible, since everyone is positioning him- or herself for the coming changes while they still fear the residual power of the old rulers. Clearly he has technical skill, and possibly he has enough talent to realize artistic ambitions which he has "kept on the shelf" in order to be poised to do something ambitious and meaningful once society changes. The peculiar transition in which he is adrift is the last months of the old Communist regime in Czechoslovakia and the first months of the "new system" which will replace it, a system this is gilded by hopeful rhetoric but whose nature may be as hostile to him as an individual as its predecessor was.

This novel is a portrait of a very ambiguous time and place. Collectively and politically, it is the moment of the "return of the repressed" (people and ideas that have been deliberately kept at the margins of society, including periods of imprisonment), some of whom will counsel forgiveness and others who will seek revenge -- or, more demoralizing, mediocre and self-centered people who will merely practice the age-old opportunism of replacing the former bosses. Pavel thinks he knows the dimensions of his own compromises in the past; he cannot condemn himself for these (as his old friend Peter does), since they were undertaken in order to save his talent (but does it exist?) for some future significant artistic venture. His personal life has been equally compromised, consisting of a series of failed relationships with women in which he appears to be the more defective partner in each case, through his inconstancy, his lack of ideals, his inability to commit himself to an individual, a gesture which he always perceives as a trap (reflecting the way he was trapped when, as a young man, he attempted to flee his nation and was captured by border-guards.) He is also witnessing the slow death of his mother (a decay from within, since her mind is vanishing while her body lingers on). He is unsure of the correct way to deal with this situation -- how to avoid the guilt of an inadequate response -- as he is of everything else in his life.

This is a brief synopsis of Pavel's story. But "Waiting for the Dark, Waiting for the Light " has another story which unwinds itself as Pavel moves through this critical year (1989-1990) in a state of increasing mental and emotional dismay, a parallel "what if" story which comprises three threads. The threads, which constitute each chapter's ending under the rubric "Film", are separate at first then begin to intertwine, weaving together three people and their stories: Pavel's "double", the photographer Fuka, who has undertaken a difficult and self-defeating romantic relationship with an idealized and uncompromising woman named Albina, a transformation of Peter's wife Alice; Robert, who awaits execution after a failed escape across the border, during which he held a school bus full of children hostage - it ends badly with the death of his partner and the bus driver at the hands of the State security services; and the long-ruling President (although not named, this is clearly Gustav Husak), whose mind is representative of the sclerotic society which he "leads", wavering between paranoia about his colleagues and endless self-justifications for the harsh measures he has used against this own countrymen, constantly caught up in the irrelevant rituals of a dying State. He is also plagued by ghosts and has hallucinatory conversations with his deceased wife. At times he feels trapped by the system he has helped to create and enforce, and he dreams of escaping it as much as Pavel once did and Robert now does. These three hypothetical lives, which displace Pavel's story and relationships with spectral images of the real world in which he dwells unhappily, move toward a dramatic (though entirely imaginary) conclusion, an episode which is brutal, somewhat insane, and blackly farcical at the same time. And this may be the beginning of a chance for Pavel's salvation in the terms which he has chosen for himself - a story that might become the realized screenplay of a film in which he says what he wants to say about himself and others. There are many brief philosophical inquiries, in the form of questions as they are phrased in a catechism, which punctuate the narrative, questions which Pavel attempts to answer as truthfully as he can, although the answers are often unsatisfactory. The book ends with one such question, concerning the nature and constancy of the "self", and it is stated in a way that is reminiscent not of Kafka (who is often cited as a great influence on Klima) but of the last part of K. Capek's "An Ordinary Life".

The character of Pavel has his predecessors in the annals of the Czech and Slovak "literature of dissent" that blossomed during the brief and misleading "thaw" of official repression that took place after Khrushchev's anti-Stalin speech of 1956. This climatic change moved slowly westward into Czechoslovakia and led to a half-decade of frustrated hopes that socialism would be reformed and humanized from within. Two of the prominent works of this dissident literature were L. Mnacko's "A Taste of Power" and L. Vaculik's "The Axe". Pavel recombines many of the social and psychological characteristics of the protagonists of these two novels (who are, respectively, Mnacko's Frank, an official news photographer who also harbors a secret redemptive project, and the anonymous journalist of `The Axe", who begins to test the limits of what he is allowed to observe and write concerning the failures of the political system and the culture it has created.) The difference between Klima's Pavel and these earlier incarnations comes about, one might say, as an accident of one's birth-date, since the earlier characters have a "pre-regime" life and memories which qualify their understanding of the present and fuel their hopes for the future. Pavel has no such experience extraneous to the system and finds it difficult to establish any basis for hope.

The style of the work, as conveyed in an excellent translation by Paul Wilson, is plain and declarative, even as it creates the skewed alternate world of the "Film" segments. Klima was once asked by Philip Roth (in an interview published in "The Spirit of Prague") if he was anxious about the loss of the oppressive conditions in which so many independent-spirited Czech and Slovak authors produced their best work (i.e., the loss of a society in which so much was forbidden that the writer gained an exalted status as an articulate truth-teller to those in power and their victims). He was not worried about this "loss" of context, suspecting that whatever replaced the old system would form men and women in a way which would require examination and exposition for its full understanding, that there would always be significant opportunities for art and artists. In this novel he takes the first step into this new milieu, which is something of a swamp, unclear in its outlines and shrouded in the mist of the present, which is often more obscuring than that of the past.
Yayrel
Klima is first-rate... as a writer and an observer of contemporary life under the thumb of any bureaucracy -- be it communism in Czechoslovakia or capitalism in America. What happens to those who resist? What happens to those who acquiesce? What happens to both when the political tables turn? What compromises do we all make? Where does our "real" life go?
Sharpbinder
In my opinion, I believe Pavel was questing for quest. His quest to make a film was the writer's tool for expressing his own views. All of the female characters were foils who asked a lot of questions so Pavel could express his thoughts out loud instead of in his head. The characters seemed soulless and two dimensional. The only complete character was his mother. But maybe all of this was intentional and in the that case the author succeeded.
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