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Fb2 Extremely Loud Incredibly Close ePub

by Jonathan Safran Foer

Category: Contemporary
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Jonathan Safran Foer
ISBN: 0241142148
ISBN13: 978-0241142141
Language: English
Publisher: Mariner Books (2005)
Pages: 368
Fb2 eBook: 1807 kb
ePub eBook: 1523 kb
Digital formats: docx lit azw txt

Jonathan Safran Foer. Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close. Books by jonathan safran foer. A Convergence of Birds.

Jonathan Safran Foer. What The? Why I’m Not Where You Are 5/21/63. Everything Is Illuminated. Joe. (with Hiroshi Sugimoto and Richard Serra). Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close.

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close is principally narrated by nine-year-old Oskar Schell, a tambourine-playing, jewellery-making,, Shakespeare-quoting little nerd who ceaselessly conceives impossible.

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close is principally narrated by nine-year-old Oskar Schell, a tambourine-playing, jewellery-making,, Shakespeare-quoting little nerd who ceaselessly conceives impossible inventions (such as "incredibly long ambulances that connect every building to a hospital") in a desperate attempt to cope with the grief (or, as Oskar puts it, "heavy boots") of losing

Jonathan safran foer. proved for me, and I can read anything I want

Jonathan safran foer. Extremly loud & incredibly close. proved for me, and I can read anything I want.

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close is a 2005 novel by Jonathan Safran Foer. The book's narrator is a nine-year-old boy named Oskar Schell

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close is a 2005 novel by Jonathan Safran Foer. The book's narrator is a nine-year-old boy named Oskar Schell. In the story, Oskar discovers a key in a vase that belonged to his father, a year after he is killed in the September 11 attacks.

Jonathan Safran Foer Biography His book ‘Eating Animals’ reflects his vegetarianism and love of animals. Foer currently lives in Brooklyn, New York near his ex-wife.

Jonathan Safran Foer Biography. Jonathan Safran Foer was born on February 21st, 1977 in Washington . Foer’s father was a lawyer and his mother was the child of two Holocaust survivors. The middle child, Foer’s two brothers have also gone on to become writers in their adult life. Foer second novel, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close was published in 2005 which was also turned into a movie. In 2008, Foer began teaching writing at Yale University. His book ‘Eating Animals’ reflects his vegetarianism and love of animals.

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close. Jonathan Safran Foer. What about a teakettle? What if the spout opened and closed when the steam came out, so it would become a mouth, and it could whistle pretty melodies, or do Shakespeare, or just crack up with me?

Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close. What about a teakettle? What if the spout opened and closed when the steam came out, so it would become a mouth, and it could whistle pretty melodies, or do Shakespeare, or just crack up with me? I could invent a teakettle that reads in Dad's voice, so I could fall asleep, or maybe a set of kettles that sings the chorus of "Yellow Submarine," which is a song by the Beatles, who I love, because entomology is one of my raisons d'être, which is a French expression that I know. Another good thing is that I could train my anus to talk when I farted.

Foer's second novel, Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (ELIC), was published three  . His goal is hopeful, but the past speaks a loud warning in stories of those who've lost loved ones.

76 MB·66,828 Downloads Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. 59 MB·40 Downloads·New!. 31 MB·13 Downloads·New!

Jonathan Safran Foer emerged as one of the most original writers of his generation with his best-selling debut novel.

Jonathan Safran Foer emerged as one of the most original writers of his generation with his best-selling debut novel.

So go away Jonathan Safran Foer. Don’t cry for me Argentina. Because the book began so originally. But Foer is a one-trick pony

So go away Jonathan Safran Foer. But Foer is a one-trick pony. In Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, he’s once more co-opted a mass tragedy and made a fruit salad of it with various voices and narrative tricks. Oh sure, the book has an underlying tone of sadness – sadness, not seriousness – because, clever as he wants to be, Foer didn’t dare go wholehog with a tragedy still as fresh as 9/11.

This hilarious, original, and heartbreaking novel by the author of Everything is Illuminated follows the precocious Oskar Blum as he travels throughout New York City and tries to make sense of his father's death in the World Trade Center attacks of September 11, 2001. Unabridged. 10 CDs.
Comments to eBook Extremely Loud Incredibly Close
Āłł_Ÿøūrš
Considering the fact that Loung Ung wrote this book from her perspective as a child during the Cambodian civil war, I was able to easily breeze through the book.

Although this book may give the impression of a very limited insight the Cambodian genocide as it was written in a child’s perspective, this book definitely did not live up to that impression. It was able to make me question, think critically and feel several different emotions within just a couple hundred pages.

I loved and still love this book so much that I recommended it to practically everyone I know. It supports my stance on war and is one of the most insightful books I’ve read up to date. Loved it and would most likely read it again.
Fog
In 2000, Loung Ung published her childhood memoir which quickly became a national bestseller. Loung Ung’s memoir opens to the picture of a happy childhood in Phnom Penh. However the family’s happy existence abruptly changes with the invasion of the Khmer Rouge. The author describes the tragedy that befell her family and her fellow Cambodians during the nightmarish rule under Pol Pot’s reign of terror in the 1970’s. Ms. Ung relates their struggle to survive and the decisions they made which dictated their future. The author covers the invasion of the Vietnamese army who defeat the Khmer Rouge and of her reunification with her siblings. Loung Ung’s memoir, though she lived through horrific experiences, speaks to endurance, and to the love of family. Recommended.
Whilingudw
It has been more than 40 years since the black-uniformed columns of the Khmer Rouge rolled into Phnom Penh and changed the life of a 5-year old girl named Loung Ung forever. With the benefit of distance, it may be all too easy to dismiss the horrors of that era to a distant corner of memory, or to brush it off as a bizarre aberration of history. That would be a mistake. Communism as an ideology may be bankrupt, but the specter of Utopian extremism lives on. Many young men and women who flock to ISIS today are fired by the same misguided zealotry, the same disdain for common human decency in the name of a supposedly better world, that brought young men and women into the folds of the Khmer Rouge 40, 50, and 60 years ago. In fact, the parallels are chilling - like many leading figures of ISIS, Al Qaeda, and the Taliban today, the leaders of the Khmer Rouge were by and large teachers. They wrote beautifully, if somewhat naively, of a return to innocent rural simplicity. They impressed their students with their erudition, simplicity of living, and apparent dedication. How can such earnest people do any wrong? Many will find out at the cost of their lives.

Loung Ung's autobiography is a moving memorial to all the lives lost in that deranged quest for Utopia. In the eyes of the Angkar (the Khmer Rouge "organization"), liquidating the members of the old regime is but a necessary prelude to building a society of true believers. And if the Angkar believes that each hectare can yield 3 tons of rice (even though the best yield before the war was only 1 ton/hectare), then it must be achievable if everybody just works hard enough. The starry-eyed school-teachers of yesteryear who dreamed of an agrarian paradise had become totally out of touch. And with the absolute power they wielded, nobody was about to tell them otherwise. The result was mass famine as local cadres starved the people to turn in their production quota. As millions perished, the top leadership witch-hunted for "saboteurs" and berated their subjects for lack of revolutionary fervor.

Ung's book is full of vivid descriptions and keen observations that bring the vicissitudes of that era poignantly to life. Many passages are naturally cinematic. These include:

- Her idyllic family life in pre-KR Phnom Penh. The author was young, but her memory is sharp. Her colourful description of early 1970's Phnom Penh with its many exotic (to an American audience) sights, sounds, and colors is an adventure in itself;

- The arrival of the KR in Phnom Penh. A moment of high historical drama, but perhaps the author was too young to remember the details. This is where Chanrithy Him's dramatic account offers some truly memorable moments;

- Getting through the KR check points on the way out of Phnom Penh, as KR soldiers systematically rounded up all former members of the old regime. Most would be executed within days;

- A widow who took refuge with the author's family, tenderly talking to the baby that she carried with her everywhere, refusing to accept that he was already dead; (p.86)

- The ritual brainwashing of children at a child labor camp, with the clapping, the chanting of "Angkar!", the endless repetition of propaganda;

- Loung's savage attack against one of her tormentors, a bully in the children's labour camp who despised her because of her light skin. Even as a 7-year old she dreamed of the day when she'd have the power to come back to look for the bullies and "beat them until she was tired". She vowed never to forget. Her sweet-natured sister couldn't understand why she wanted to retain such horrible memories. But as Loung explained, she needed the anger, the thoughts of retribution, to fill the bottomless sadness in her soul.

I've always said that anger, or at least righteous indignation, is a much under-rated emotion. It needs to be controlled. It needs to be properly-channeled. But it's the juice that drives much social progress.

Finally, a few observations about the author's family background. A few readers took offense at the author's perceived lack of sensitivity. Perhaps she took too much pride in her family's light skin, high status, and economic prosperity. Reading her account of her family's encounter with the villagers in the KR base areas, it's quite evident there was much class resentment and perhaps plain-old jealousy on the part of the country folk. Even to this day many villagers in the old KR base areas seem to recall that era wistfully - Pol Pot's cremation site seems to have become something of a shrine. No doubt the villagers didn't enjoy the regimentation, but it was a topsy-turvy time when poor people like themselves could feel superior to the city folk who probably looked down on them. Not that the Khmer Rouge cadres themselves were particularly holy, of course. Plenty were mere opportunists. The Khmer Rouge village chief who lorded over the "new people" ate better, dressed better, and was apparently not above trading extra food for gold at exorbitant prices. (Ironically his corruption probably saved some lives, because life definitely got a lot harder after Angkar tightened things up and sent more soldiers into the villages.) As for Pol Pot, the young Loung Ung knew almost nothing about him, except that he was "fat" in a country of living skeletons.

A postscript: Those readers who are interested in how Loung and her siblings fared after the war may be interested in reading her second book, Lucky Child. While some readers may find the events in her later life less dramatic, I found it equally fascinating to read about her endeavors to come to terms with her past while trying to make a new life for herself in America. Like many children from similar backgrounds, she went through a phase when she attempted to cut all ties with her past (to the point of deliberately avoiding contact with her siblings) and plunged headlong into mainstream American youth culture. As she got older, she discovered that she could only conquer the ghosts of her past by embracing her roots, and to rise above her personal losses (and petty personal vengeance) by making them her life-long cause. While my own life experiences were nowhere nearly as dramatic as Luong's, there are enough similarities that what she wrote rang true to me and resonated. Well worth a read.
Brakree
I happened to be touring the "Re-Education" School in Phnom Penh and the Killing Fields outside the city while reading this book. I can't say that I have ever felt I was living history by doing so. It was a profound experience. The book, so beautifully written in first person, tells a harrowing story of a small girl whose bravery surpasses anyone I have known or read about. Her writing deftly handles facing death, torture, starvation and endless cruelty aside times of overwhelming joy and compassion and the struggle to understand the dichotomy. Thank-you Ms. Ung, for sharing your story which will always be tattooed to my heart.
Gardataur
Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge exposed! This book is wonderfully written. It feels like you are a small child experiencing the actual situation while you are reading the book. I found this book profound. I am deeply grateful that Loung Ung took the time and painstaking effort to share the reality of that time period with us the readers. I was just 20 years old at the time these events took place and was really unaware of the horrific history.

The book takes you through executions, starvation, disease, forced labour camps, and systematically killing of human beings for no other reason than they had an education. The description of starvation, stomach ache, extreme exhaustion, diarrhea and aching joints will leave you with a deeper understanding of the horrific situation these people experienced.

I have now started the Lucky Child ... I can't wait to see how see adapts to living in Vermont ... and to see her healing process.
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