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Fb2 Kings of Albion ePub

by Julian Rathbone

Category: British and Irish
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Julian Rathbone
ISBN: 0316854077
ISBN13: 978-0316854078
Language: English
Publisher: Little Brown Uk; First Edition edition (May 1, 2000)
Pages: 358
Fb2 eBook: 1742 kb
ePub eBook: 1307 kb
Digital formats: mobi txt docx mobi

Rathbone’s novel is excellent, both as a fictional adventure story and as a detailed and enlightening description of an ancient land’ The Times.

Author: Julian Rathbone. There are moments in this novel when one could be watching an episode of Blackadder. Rathbone’s novel is excellent, both as a fictional adventure story and as a detailed and enlightening description of an ancient land’ The Times. No doubt hoping to extend the extravagant the-road theme of his previous novel (The Last English King, 1999), but falling short, Rathbone shifts to the Wars of the Roses, and a group of travelers from India who arrive just in time to be in the thick of the intrigue.

Kings of Albion Hardcover – January 7, 2002. Julian Rathbone is the author of many books including JOSEPH (reissued in Abacus in November 1999) and KING FISHER LIVES, both of which were shortlisted for the Booker prize. by. Julian Rathbone (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

Jullian Rathbone "The kings of Albion". Want to like this page?

Jullian Rathbone "The kings of Albion". Want to like this page?

Kings of Albion: Little, Brown, 2000. Homage: Allison and Busby, 2001.

Rathbone created four characters who appear in more than one book, permitting a certain grouping, while never taking over the heterogeneous spirit of his work or deflecting him from the pursuit of wider fictional interests. First was Inspector Jan Argand (The Euro-Killers, Base Case, Watching The Detectives). Kings of Albion: Little, Brown, 2000. A Very English Agent: Little, Brown, 2002.

Kings of Albion book. The prolific author Julian Rathbone was a writer of crime stories, mysteries and thrillers who also turned his hand to the historical novel, science fiction and even horror - and much of his writing had strong Julian Christopher Rathbone was born in 1935 in Blackheath, southeast London. His great-uncle was the actor and great Sherlock Holmes interpreter Basil Rathbone, although they never met.

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England, 1460: The War of the Roses. Rival factions – Lancastrians and Yorkists – are hacking each other to death in a conflict that only the English could name after a beautifully-scented flower. It’s not an ideal climate for tourists – but three exotic travellers from the Far East are not here for pleasure. They’ve come to find a missing kinsman. The English, however, are truly strange. Most of the indigenous population are of the cowed peasant variety whilst any noble who can’t trace his ancestry to Norman Conquest isn’t, really, an awfully nice chap.

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A wonderfully offbeat take on medieval England at its most brutal and savage, KINGS OF ALBION snatches history, imbues it with the spirit of Rider Haggard and Joseph Conrad, turns it on its head, invites scintillating speculation and, best of all, renders it into a fabulously readable novel. Rate it . Track Random Acts of Kindness. Check out ButterflyCoins. org, another project from the BookCrossing team! Bookish Quotes. To every man who struggles with his own soul in mystery, a book that is a book flowers once, and seeds, and is gone.

England, 1460: the War of the Roses. Rival factions - Lancastrians and Yorkists - are hacking each other to death in a conflict that only the English could name after a beautifully scented flower. It's not an ideal climate for tourists - but three exotic travellers from the Far East are not here for pleasure. They've come to find a missing kinsman.The English, however, are truly strange. Most of the indigenous population is of the cowed peasant variety whilst any noble who can't trace his ancestry to the Norman Conquest isn't, really, an awfully nice chap. In between battles of the most astonishing brutality, they convey respects instead of affection, make love strangely (and briefly) and amuse themselves by playing a game with an inflated bladder that is in every way a war except it's called 'footie'.
Comments to eBook Kings of Albion
Leniga
This book has much to recommend it. It is vivid, alive with the smells and sights of 15th Century England. The story has shifting points of view by having different narrators, and this is handled with skill by Rathbone. By having the main narrator, Ali, an Arab, who travels the Middle and Far East, it puts English History into a World History Context.
Conversely, I found myself getting confused by the events. Who was fighting who and that sort of thing. Now I know with the War of the Roses, it is difficult to differentiate between the two sides, but I would have thought it was the novelist's job to do just this for us. Towards the end of the book, I had stopped caring about either the characters or the plot. There is also too much description of people. A brief descripton suffices. "She was tall, with beautiful brown eyes and olive skin" is all you need to say about someone. A paragraph spent describing someone's looks is a paragraph wasted. Too much description and the resulting image is that of a grotesque freak.
This is such a disappointment after The Last English King, which is so superior.
Nafyn
This is basically Forrest Gump set in England during the Wars of the Roses. Except that the role of Forrest is played by not one person but rather a colourful group of Oriental travellers who refer to England as Ingelrond and who get to meet most of the important characters on the Lancaster and York sides and participate (usually as observers but sometimes more actively) in the battles and other pivotal events.

There is a lot of sharp irony in the book, as it is consistently told through the viewpoint of the more civilised Orientals who are horrified at the brutality and savagery of contemporary Europe. A nice example: one of the travellers proposes to call their own civilised and pleasant land (Burma, basically) The First World, the less advanced but still somewhat civilised Arab countries they pass on their way The Second Wolrd, and finally - barbarian Europe The Third World. Possibly true for its time, I suppose.

There are also many literary allusions, which are fun to detect. I am pretty sure I've missed some.

Overall, I enjoyed this book a lot. Still, I took off one star for the following reasons:
1. The narrative structure is needlessly complex. I don't mind shifting points of view (two books I loved which had much more complex structure were The Song of Troy and The Orphan's Tales) but here it just felt a bit over-wrought.
2. The author pedals a bit too much the ideology of the so-called Brethren of the Free Spirit, so that at a few points the characters are lecturing each other (and the reader!) instead of living. This is sufficiently frequent to be a bit annoying but not to the point of becoming a show-stopper.
3. There was one twist which I saw coming from the very beginning, as anyone with more than a cursory knowledge of the period's political history would have seen. Another small one at the end was also rather obvious.

Still, quite recommended!
lubov
This delighful and well written book relates the adventures of a group of Asians in England during the War of the Roses. An Eastern Indian prince and his entourage are guided by a Middle Eastern merchant to a country called Ingelond. The prince wants to learn about the arts of warfare that may aid his own people in their wars against the encroaching Sultans. They are accompanied by a Fakir and a young woman whose goal in life it is to experience the pleasures of earthly life. This she finds plentiful in many of the exotic men she encounters.
The experiences of this odd group with regard to customs and weather are amusing while the detailed accounts of politics, battles, and players are exciting and informative.
The language of the book is modern but its application consistent with the presumed culture of the time, making it occasionally rude and vulgar but also entirely fitting.
I recommend this story highly to those who are interested in history and also want to be thrilled and amused.
Bev
This could have been a great book - the idea of seeing medieval England throguh the eyes of foreigners from a distant and more advanced civilisation is a good one, but the author falls back on the traditional stereotypes of the Middles Ages - stupid violent knights, thicko peasants speaking in 'Mummerset' accents, filth and ignorance etc. etc. In makes you wonder why someone is drawn to write about a period and people that he clearly despises so much. One to avoid.
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