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Fb2 The Colour of Blood (Paladin Books) ePub

by Brian Moore

Category: Action and Adventure
Subcategory: Fiction
Author: Brian Moore
ISBN: 0586087370
ISBN13: 978-0586087374
Language: English
Publisher: HarperCollins; New edition edition (January 1, 1996)
Pages: 224
Fb2 eBook: 1805 kb
ePub eBook: 1379 kb
Digital formats: lrf mbr rtf azw

Brian Moore was born in Belfast in 1921 and was educated there at St Malachy's College. He has been shortlisted for the Booker Prize three times with The Doctor's Wife, The Colour of Blood and Lies of Silence. Series: Paladin Books.

Brian Moore was born in Belfast in 1921 and was educated there at St Malachy's College. He served with the British Ministry of War Transport during the latter part of the Second World War in North Africa, Italy and France.

The Colour of Blood book. Brian Moore uses the thriller genre to tell us something about the dilemma of being a religious leader in a country that only reluctantly accepts the church. Mar 22, 2019 Jack Heath marked it as to-read.

The Colour of Blood, published in 1987, is a political thriller by Northern Irish-Canadian novelist Brian Moore about Stephen Bem, a Cardinal in an unnamed East European country who is in conflict with the Roman Catholic Church hierarchy and finds h. .

The Colour of Blood, published in 1987, is a political thriller by Northern Irish-Canadian novelist Brian Moore about Stephen Bem, a Cardinal in an unnamed East European country who is in conflict with the Roman Catholic Church hierarchy and finds himself caught in the middle of an escalating revolution.

The Colour of Blood by Brian Moore (Paperback, 1994). New (other): lowest price. item 1 The Colour of Blood (Paladin Books)-Brian Moore -The Colour of Blood (Paladin Books)-Brian Moore. item 2 Moore, Brian, The Colour of Blood (Paladin Books), Paperback, Very Good Book -Moore, Brian, The Colour of Blood (Paladin Books), Paperback, Very Good Book. item 3 The colour of blood by Brian Moore (Paperback) Expertly Refurbished Product -The colour of blood by Brian Moore (Paperback) Expertly Refurbished Product.

Brian Moore, 1921 - 1999 Brian Moore was born in Belfast on August 25, 1921 to Doctor James Bernard Moore and Eileen McFadden. The color of blood A Dutton Obelisk Paperback (Том 422) A William Abrahams Book. He attended St. Malachy's College, a Catholic school, where the students where beaten on the hands daily. He left the college without a School Leaving Certificate because he failed Math.

Color of Blood is one of the more exciting books that I have read in a long time. The main character, Cardinal Bem, demonstrates to the reader his struggle of being on the run from those who look suspicious, which includes almost anyone. A good book to read when you want suspense with a surprise ending.

The Colour of Blood (Paladin Books), 0586087370, Moore, Brian, Very Good Book.

by. Moore, Brian, 1921-1999. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on July 15, 2014. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

He has been shortlisted for the Booker Prize three times with The Doctor's Wife, The Colour of Blood and Lies of Silence

He has been shortlisted for the Booker Prize three times with The Doctor's Wife, The Colour of Blood and Lies of Silence.

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Are you sure you want to remove The Colour of Blood (Paladin Books) from your list? The Colour of Blood (Paladin Books). Published January 1996 by Harpercollins.

Held against his will at a safe-house after an assassination attempt, Cardinal Bem is unsure whether his captors work for the government or for the Catholic Church
Comments to eBook The Colour of Blood (Paladin Books)
Tall
This book was dark and vague. The end was not really a surprise, tragic, but not really surprising.
Wetiwavas
The Colour of Blood is a tight, page-turning Catholic thriller in the Graham Greene tradition. The opening sequence hits the ground running: Cardinal Bem, head of the Church in an unnamed Soviet bloc country, is being chauffered back to his residence when "he saw, peripherally, a black car racing very close to his. He turned to look. The driver, a woman, wore a green silk scarf tied around her head. Beside her in the passenger seat, a bearded man, holding a revolver in both hands, raised it, aiming at him."

That's just the first page. The rest of the book follows the Cardinal as he flees from unknown captors and attempts to discover what organization was behind the assassination attempt--the Secret Police, who are antagonistic to the Church, or could it have been a fringe organization within the Church, who feel that Cardinal Bem has compromised too often with the Communist government?

Brian Moore's writing has textbook clarity: limpid, economical, and unfussy. "The Colour of Blood" was short-listed for the prestigious Booker Prize in the U.K, and was awarded the Sunday Express' Book of the Year. Though it drags in a few spots, and the ending (as another reviewer noted) is somewhat anticlimactic, on the whole the novel is well-crafted, suspenseful, and deeply orthodox. As an exemplar of smart genre writing, "The Colour of Blood" could take pride of place next to a Graham Greene thriller.
Gann
Though he is a cardinal, Bem has successfully managed to avoid the sin of pride, and is attempting to do the will of his god, within his church. Surrounded by gentle and religious people, immersed in the day-to-day details of his regime, he is totally unprepared for the sudden intrusion of personal violence in his life. An attempt is made on his life, followed by his kidnapping and incarceration. Suddenly, he finds himself struggling against hidden enemies, and struggling to find and feel the will of his god.
This is perhaps the most taut and action-packed of any Brian Moore novels. Right down to the last word, this book will keep you riveted and straining. And in Cardinal Bem, Moore has perhaps created one of his most simply admirable and likeable protagonists ever. But he lacks none of the inner honesty and complexity that mark Moore's protagonists. In addition to being an incredibly suspenseful thriller, the book is as emotive and thought-provoking as anyone could ask. It is a beauty.
huckman
I found this novel to be a consistently interesting page turner.Yet, I understand the somewhat mixed reviews.The novel never digs that deep.That could be seen as a problem given its subject matter.

COLOR is set in a country that can only be Poland.Although Moore goes out of his way to tell you it isn't Poland.This is understandable .I don't think Moore was trying to write a novel about Poland and undoubtedly didn't want to deal with pedantic criticisms to the effect that he'd inaccurately rendered details of Polish history and politics.The novel centers around Cardinal Bem who has managed to negotiate a fairly comfortable relationship with the Communist government.More militant elements in the Church want to pursue a confrontation with the government which Bem assumes will be disastrous .Bem is a classical moderate in a situation where moderates aren't popular.In effect the militants try to stage a coup within the Church in order to pursue their policy of confrontation.This leads to a series of events culminating in a dramatic ending.

Moore's pacing is excellent and I was genuinely interested to find out what would happen next.Still , I will acknowledge that there is a certain superficiality here.You never really get a sense of what drives the characters nor what's at stake.Also the villains are a little cartoonish.Minor criticism of a book that is an intelligent , engrossing entertainment.
inform
"The Colour of Blood" is set in an unnamed, fictitious Eastern European country during the 1980s. (References in the text date the action to late August and early September of 1986). At least, the country is ostensibly fictitious, but there can be little doubt that Brian Moore had Poland in mind; the country is predominantly Catholic, has a strong, independent trade union movement on the lines of Solidarity and power lies, not with the civilian Communist Party leaders but with a military dictator reminiscent of General Jaruzelski. To make it even more obvious which country he is referring to, Moore gives his hero the surname Bem (after the Polish national hero Jozef Bem) and his military strongman the surname Urban; Jaruzelski's propaganda minister was named Jerzy Urban.

After Cardinal Stephen Bem, the head of the Roman Catholic Church in this country, narrowly survives an assassination attempt, he is taken into what is described as "protective custody" by men claiming to belong to the Security Services. He discovers, however, that his captors are not what they seem, but are in reality members of a fanatical anti-Communist movement within the Church, who despise Bem because they seem him as a traitor and a collaborator with the regime. Their aim is to prevent him from attending a forthcoming religious celebration in which a more radical Archbishop intends to call for protests and demonstrations against the Government. Escaping from his captors, Bem has to make his way to the celebrations to ensure that his own call for peaceful co-existence can be heard.

Moore is sometimes bracketed together with Graham Greene as a "Catholic novelist", but there was an important difference between them. Greene was brought up as an Anglican but converted to Catholicism as a young man. Moore was a "cradle Catholic" who lost his faith but who nevertheless continued to deal with Catholic themes. "The Colour of Blood" reminded me in some respects of Green's writings. Like some of Greene's novels it is in form a political thriller, but a thriller which attempts to deal with religious and philosophical issues. There are similarities with Greene's "The Power and the Glory", another novel about a Catholic clergyman confronted with a dictatorial, anti-religious regime.

Nevertheless, I felt that "The Colour of Blood" did not work either as a thriller or as an exploration of politics and religion. On a purely technical level, I found it dull and pedestrian, a thriller which fails to thrill. On a more serious level I found it dispiriting and politically objectionable. I do not mean by this that Moore is an apologist for Communism; no Marxist novelist wishing to make propaganda for his particular creed would be likely to set one of his novels in a thinly-fictionalised version of Jaruzelski's Poland, a regime which abandoned the last vestiges of the pretence that Communism was a dictatorship of the proletariat rather than a dictatorship pure and simple. Although Jaruzelski was ostensibly a Communist, his real ideology was a jackbooted, parade-ground authoritarianism, virtually indistinguishable from that of his ostensibly capitalist contemporaries such as Pinochet and Galtieri.

Moore's political creed, as expressed through his main character Bem, amounts to a sort of passive fatalism, a belief that God is on the side of the big battalions and that the little man, if he knows what is good for him, will not challenge their divine right to rule. What makes it so depressing is that Bem opposes not only violent resistance to the regime- Christian pacifism has a long and honourable history- but also any form of non-violent protest. Just two years after this book was written in 1987 the falsity of that creed was exposed when all over Eastern Europe- not just in Poland but also in Hungary, East Germany, Czechoslovakia and Rumania- the little men stood up against their oppressors. The Berlin Wall fell and Communism found itself in that dustbin of history it had long predicted would be the resting-place of all opposing ideologies. This book should join it there.
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