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Fb2 The Killing Zone: How Why Pilots Die ePub

by Paul Craig

Category: Transportation
Subcategory: Engineering and Transport
Author: Paul Craig
ISBN: 007136269X
ISBN13: 978-0071362696
Language: English
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Professional; 1 edition (December 12, 2000)
Pages: 304
Fb2 eBook: 1874 kb
ePub eBook: 1474 kb
Digital formats: doc lrf docx azw

Paul A. Craig, a longtime pilot, flight instructor, aviation educator, and author, designed and conducted the extensive pilot study that uncovered the Killing Zone.

Paul A.

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The Killing Zone : How and Why Pilots Di.

The Killing Zone : How and Why Pilots Die. by Paul A. Craig. Knowledge is power, but overconfidence can be fatal; nothing makes this more clear than The Killing Zone. Many, if not all, of the accidents Craig cites could have been avoided with proper planning or decisionmaking. Outsiders might find it morbid, but a good pilot learns from others' mistakes and passes that knowledge on.

You can fly through the zone. Or you can die in it. Most pilots earn their private certificate with 40 to 70 flight hours. Then they leave their instructors behind and enter the killing zone. Grimly embracing the period from 50 to 350 flight hours - a vital time for new pilots to build practical and decision-making skills - this deadly zone lays in wait for those who err, killing more pilots than all other periods put together. You don't have to be one of them.

Worthwhile book, especially for pilots entering that zone. The author's conclusion that serious accidents occur with greater frequency for pilots with 100-500 hrs ignores the fact that there's a large bump in the pilot population there

Worthwhile book, especially for pilots entering that zone. FWIW, IMO the books main premises is flawed. The author's conclusion that serious accidents occur with greater frequency for pilots with 100-500 hrs ignores the fact that there's a large bump in the pilot population there. Yes. It's an entertaining read, but the author's conclusions are completely unsupportable from the data provided.

This literal survival guide for new pilots identifies "the killing zone," the 40-250 . This book's format is not supported currently, please contact the publisher.

This literal survival guide for new pilots identifies "the killing zone," the 40-250 flight hours during which unseasoned aviators are likely to commit lethal mistakes. Presents the statistics of how many pilots will die in the zone within a year; calls attention to the eight top pilot killers (such as "VFR into IFR," "Takeoff and Climb"); and maps strategies for avoiding, diverting, correcting, and managing the dangers  .

This literal survival guide for new pilots identifies "the killing zone," the 40-250 flight hours during which unseasoned aviators are . Presents the statistics of how many pilots will die in the zone within a year; calls attention to the eight top pilot killers (such as "VFR into IFR," "Takeoff and Climb"); and maps strategies for avoiding, diverting, correcting, and managing the dangers

Good book,I've got it and there are some useful chapters on how not to end it all in an avoidable accident.

Good book,I've got it and there are some useful chapters on how not to end it all in an avoidable accident. The Author gives lots of general advice on 'The Killing Zone', together with separate chapters on 'Takeoff and Climb', 'Fuel Management', 'Ice' and about 15 other areas where inexperienced pilots have come to grief. Each chapter has a number of case studies with associated in-depth discussion and advice. There is also a chapter at the end about pilot personality, including a test so you can find out if you've got the right attitude, and a section on statistics.

This literal survival guide for new pilots identifies "the killing zone," the 40-250 flight hours during which unseasoned aviators are likely to commit lethal mistakes. Presents the statistics of how many pilots will die in the zone within a year; calls attention to the eight top pilot killers (such as "VFR into IFR," "Takeoff and Climb"); and maps strategies for avoiding, diverting, correcting, and managing the dangers. Includes a Pilot Personality Self-Assessment Exercise that identifies pilot "types" and how each type can best react to survive the killing zone.
Comments to eBook The Killing Zone: How Why Pilots Die
Lestony
I find this book extremely useful not only for "the killing zone" potential victims, but for every pilot as well. Although I'm also a low timer, basically there are nothing new for me regarding to the major safety rules: don't fly into marginal VFR conditions, land straight ahead in case of engine failure on take-off, plan each flight carefully, don't forget your carburetor heat, watch for other traffic, etc. However, Paul raises the most important and disturbing for each new pilot questions: What are my prospects? Do I have a chance to gain my experience being safe? Am I carrying extra risks? Do I really need to get the instrument rating or I can save my money and fly only in the perfect weather conditions? Should I pay a special attention on my current skills and attitude?

If one belongs to the minority, who usually makes poor go/no-go decisions, this book might help him or her to review and revise his/her habits.
If you used to be safe and cautious and know that for sure, this book reminds, you should never relax your vigilance by thinking, you are invulnerable, because you have the proper attitude.
If you are a paranoiac like I'm, who listens to the ATIS seven times and eventually taxis back to the apron, this book will help you to get rid of some unnecessary fears and become a little more confident, so now you can take more practice flying frequently, and get out of the killing zone sooner.

And wow! here is also a little bonus! Now you know exactly, what tell to your mom or wife, who is constantly worrying about your passion. Here you meet a lot of well-reasoned explanations why a bad end when flying GA aircraft is NOT obviously inevitable.
Tegore
When I first read the book, my confidence level dropped because I am in this "Killing Zone". In the begining it does make you think that no matter what, if you have less than 350 hours, your chances of getting killed are pretty good.

What I do like about the book is - it is a great review of basic aviation knowledge. He breaks down the the reasons of why pilots die. It's all about the basics and not becoming complacent. It gets you thinking. It reminds you that like a car you don't have the opportunity to pull over and evaluate the situation.

I recommend the book to all pilots and especially student pilots. It is a good reality check for all pilots and students. Above all it is the type of book you keep on the side as a reference.

The statistics need to be updated.
Celace
This author presents the facts about accidents and causes and links that to the stage of experience of pilots making the strong case that most accidents occur between 50 hours and 250 hours when pilots are on their own and very inexperienced. The low accident rates below 50 hours are explained because more than likely we have been with our instructors and skill levels would be high through practice and of course the instructors are right there to correct mistakes. All new pilots should read this analysis. Good book!
Ber
Deceptive. The book does not provide any insight in the human factor, mechanics, weather or any other accident-causing factors. Rather the opposite: it is just a compilation of short, context-depriven stories of pilot fates, sprinkled with some hints on what (not) to do. Not to mention the painfully wrong and misleading statistics (why taking relative data, when absolute figures are much more shocking... and useless?). All to prove the author's point: whatever that goes any far from regulations and procedures is deadly, while the opposite guarantees a happy ending.
Shortly: you can learn more from reading just some NTSB reports, but this book is much better written and more entertaining, though.
Mpapa
I bought this along with a new headset the day after my first flying lesson. It's kind of a strange book for a student to buy just because dying in the cockpit is a real danger. But this is in my collection now because my first lesson also included an emergency landing. That was incredibly frightening and it taught me a lot, even on day one. The title of the book seems really morbid until you read it. It's almost more reassuring than anything because it gives you accidents and the reports of those accidents as well as a conclusion as to where the pilot may have gone wrong. Although this is nonfiction, it doesn't read like some boring fact-to-fact book. It's a page turner as long as flying interests you.
Andromakus
Oh, I cannot even stop reading it during the midnight.
The book teaches your how to be a safe pilot by using so many real life examples. I think every private pilot should read it.
Dandr
a wakeup call for those who don't regularly read NTSB reports. nice addition to the Air Safety Institute's annaul Nall Report
worth reading, even if your not a pilot
This book contains detailed review of pilot induced errors through many NTSB accident reports categorized by cause and commented by author. Many typical cases of pilot errors are selected to describe possible cause-effect scenarios. Author also presents statistical charts whose purpose is to warn students and low time pilots. Since I am PPL pilot student, I found this book a good source of information on GA pilot mistakes. If you are also low timer (50-350 hours) read it and fly quite a bit safer.

On down side I must mention it would be useful to see more photos and drawings from actual accidents.
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