Fb2 Battleships ePub

by Captian Peter Hore

Category: Transportation
Subcategory: Engineering and Transport
Author: Captian Peter Hore
ISBN: 0754814076
ISBN13: 978-0754814078
Language: English
Publisher: Anness; First Edition edition (September 7, 2005)
Pages: 256
Fb2 eBook: 1506 kb
ePub eBook: 1518 kb
Digital formats: lrf rtf lit mobi

Author:Captain Peter Hore. Book Binding:Hardback. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites.

Author:Captain Peter Hore. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard. Read full description. Battleships by Captain Peter Hore (Hardback, 2005). Pre-owned: lowest price.

This book examines the many amazing ships that have existed worldwide, and it includes the main battles or operations in which the ships have taken part. Each ship is illustrated with photos sourced from around the world, and technical details are also included. This is a must-have reference book for everyone interested in the ships that have helped make history.

Captain Peter Hore served worldwide in the Royal Navy from 1962 to 2000, mostly in frigates and destroyers. He is a fluent linguist who also plays chess and sailed for the Royal Navy. This new book titled, "Battleships", by Peter Hore, is a true delight to look at and look through - a real treat! Few books on the subject of Battleships, and their kin can boast as much visually stimulating material in a logical, easy to follow format. In fact, my 16 year old preppy daughter Angela saw this book, thumbed through it, and knew straight off that she had to get me this book, even with her own money.

Examining the many amazing ships that have existed worldwide. This book has a lot of technical and historical details (complemented by drawings, paintings and photographs) about virtually all the classes of battleships that ever existed since around the XIX century, a must read for warship enthusiasts. Nov 05, 2012 William rated it it was amazing. This is a must have if you are interested in battleships. This book excellently summarizes the long history of battleships and lists most of the battleships in existence.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read

Книги Исторические Автор: Peter Hore Формат: pdf Размер: 38,9 Язык: Английский0 (голосов: 0) Оценка:Иллюстрированная история линкоров. Рассказ о развитии этого типа военных кораблей начиная с последней трети XIX века до войны в Заливе. Свыше 550 фотографий. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. We all like the idea of saving a bit of cash, so when we found out how many good quality used products are out there - we just had to let you know! We want your experience with World of Books to be enjoyable and problem free.

Books & Literature. Fandoms: Peter Pan - J. M. Barrie, Lost Boy: The True Story of Captain Hook - Christina Henry. Cartoons & Comics & Graphic Novels. Celebrities & Real People. Teen And Up Audiences. No Archive Warnings Apply.

It is beautifully illustrated by more than 175 archive and museum photographs, drawings and diagrams, shown in colour and black-and-white.

A fascinating guide to the fantastic fighting machines from 1870 to the present day.
Comments to eBook Battleships
Yozshujind
YES - YES, there is a "BUT" here. Allow me to elaborate:

IN A NUTSHELL: BOTH EARLIER REVIEWERS ARE 100% CORRECT IN THEIR REMARKS!

Since I have no objection to plain English, here goes.

This new book titled, "Battleships", by Peter Hore, is a true delight to look at and look through - a real treat! Few books on the subject of Battleships, and their kin [Battle Cruisers, Armored Cruisers, Large Cruisers, Pocket Battleships & Monitors] can boast as much visually stimulating material in a logical, easy to follow format. In fact, my 16 year old preppy daughter Angela saw this book, thumbed through it, and knew straight off that she had to get me this book, even with her own money. Thank you Angela, I am grateful, for this book does the visual, and simple historic organization part very well, and allows me to discuss Battleship "stuff" with people that don't know a Large Cruiser from a Battlecruiser. Now I can quickly show them.

WHAT IT'S ALL ABOUT: REASONABLY PRICED COFFEE TABLE BOOK WITH ILLUSTRATIONS!

Okay, I'm really not trying to be snide, but the closer one looks at this book, the more visible and distracting the flaws in it become. Facts are a bit garbled in places, and as one reviewer pointed out, do appear to change from one paragraph to the next. Also, it seems as though the person who wrote the book knows how to write this type of book quite well, but not necessarily on this precise topic, the "history of Battleships".

WHAT'S NOT GREAT ABOUT THIS BOOK:

For instance, while there is a good photo of each of the dozens of classes of ships examined, frequently, the exact ship is NOT mentioned in the caption, leaving us to guess which ship it is. Also, when the pictures were taken is often not mentioned, which is important, since most Battleships were refitted numerous times during their lifespan, especially in response to the growing need for air-defences. This shortcoming is probably as aggravating to modelers as it is to historians.

Another problem is the reported displacement of the ships, especially those made and/or modernized during the treaty period 1921-1936. In many cases, some of the ships were much heavier than listed, the "Deutschland Class" - "Pocket Battleships", for example, were listed as 11,700 tons. They were supposed, under treaty to displace around 10,000 tons, and I believe that the 11,700 tons was the weight the German navy gave as the fully loaded displacement. Nevertheless, most naval historians suggest the weight of this class of vessel to be in the 13-17,000 ton range, depending on whether you figure it as "standard load" or "heavy load" [battle provisioned for stores, fuel, munitions]. Here's the kicker, technically speaking, the "Deutschland Class" - "Pocket Battleships", are NOT BATTLESHIPS, but Armored Cruisers, or Heavy Cruisers, depending on who you speak to. Never were they seen as Battleships - so why are they in an Encylopedia of Battleships? Obviously, because people who have a passing interest in the subject have heard of the Graf Spee, and it is nice to have its story, though briefly told, included in this edition.

WHAT HAPPENED TO THE CANOPUS?

Nevertheless, there are many true stories about real battleships, such as the "Canopus", [1 of 6 of the Canopus Class] launched around 1897, that have been omitted. Each of the other 5 Canopus class Pre-Dreadnought battleships have a blurb about their history, except for the Canopus herself. Interesting, because the Canopus herself, was the ship with the most interesting story of the class, and it involved unique and controversial tactics and Winston churchill too. Alas, not a single printed word about the Canopus, the flagship and most interesting to talk about among the six of the Canopus class!

THE ALASKA CLASS CRUISER IS NOT A BATTLESHIP:

Again, they include the "Alaska" class "Large Cruiser" [ALASKA, 1943- GUAM, 1945] in this edition. These were huge ships, over 800 feet long and 31,000 tons, built for speed and to overpower the fast heavy-cruisers that the Japanese had been up-gunning since the beginning of the war. By the time they saw action, their role had become obsolete, and they were used for the remainder of the Pacific war as escorts for the "Fast-Carriers". Nevertheless, they were not Battleships and this too tended to confuse the issues with some readers because Battleships were never designed for such an ancillary role, and including the "Alaska Class" gives that impression.

SO WHAT ABOUT "BATTLECRUISERS"?

In essence, it is probably okay to include the last incarnation of the Battlecruisers "Hood", "Scharnhorst" and the "Gneisenau" as they clearly were built as Battlecruisers, not Heavy Cruisers or Armored Cruisers or Large Cruisers. I realize that this sounds like a lot of rhetorical nonsense. Nevertheless, to those of us who try to make sense of these historically important symbols of 20th century power, accuracy is vital to understanding this subject.

However, these three ships, which looked like Battleships and had the armarments of Battleships, were surprisingly easily sunk due to a lack of the armored protection that sets a Battleship apart and above a Battlecruiser. Case in point, the Bismarck easily sunk the Hood by blowing-up the Hood's forward magazine, quite probably from the same lack of armored deck protection that caused the same disaster three times at Jutland. At the time of its tragic sinking, the Hood, a Battlecruiser laid down during World War 1 was the largest ship in the British Navy and in fact had a larger displacement than any American "Battleship". The Hood began its life, after a redesign that added 5,000 tons and was supposed to take the lessons of Jutland into consideration, at 41,200 tons, but gained weight over the years and displaced nearly 48,000 tons at the time of its sinking. This weight gain partially explains the reason why the Hood was such a "wet ship" [forecastle washed in heavy seas].

The only ships of larger displacement in the American Navy, in 1941, were the two Carriers, Saratoga and Lexington which not surprisingly were built [their hulls] from the same plans as the Battlecruiser Hood, which the British gave to the U.S. Navy during a time where feelings of marshall good fellowship ran deep, in 1918.

WHAT IS SO IMPORTANT AND DIFFERENT ABOUT BATTLESHIPS?

Battleships were built to mete out and withstand, the maximum destructive force deliverable at the time of their design and hopefully during their operational lifespan. [Which explains why each new & improved class became obsolete so fast] Unlike other naval vessels, the Battleship was built with as few compromises as economically and technically feasible toward the objectives of taking and giving maximum punishment through force. No other vessel before or after has been built so apparently with this axiom, so that the level of a nation's technical, industrial and economical development can be measured and compared to other nations, on this basis. So can a nation's will, which was the case for the Imperial Japanese Empire. This is what makes battles like Jutland so historically significant. To include the myriad of interesting naval support vessels [already listed above] in this examination of Battleships, simply muddies the water and makes the obvious more difficult to understand.

BOTTOM LINE: NICELY ILLUSTRATED -- INTERESTING TO MOST PEOPLE

This is a very good read and wonderfully interesting to look at. Having said that, I would have preferred a quantitative examination of the ships' protective systems and immunity zones as well as specifications of the naval ordnance used, rather than the inclusion of "Battleship-like" vessels.

-* RECOMMENDED READING:

- U.S. BATTLESHIPS: AN ILLUSTRATED DESIGN HISTORY, 1985, NORMAN FRIEDMAN

- BATTLESHIPS OF WORLD WAR 1, 1972, ANTONY PRESTON [very hard to find]
Voodoozragore
This hardback book has 256 pages and a great many photos. There are some good photos of ships rarely seen elsewhere, I particularly liked the striking photo of HMS London (pre-dreadnought) in camo and the photos turn out very nicely as the paper is good quality glossy, similar quality to Robert Ballard's "Discovery of.." series.

Obviously it's not as detailed as the well known and more expensive technical history books on battleships but it is printed on nicer paper and the value is quite excellent!

Each class of battleship from various nations (Gloire through to the end of WW2) has at least one photo, technical specifications and some history. There is also a history of battleships before the main listings, featuring famous battleship actions, profiles of noteworthy people etc.

Don't expect detailed specifications and analysis of fighting ability, armament ranges etc, this would be beyond the scope of this book.

As a warship modeller I wouldn't buy this book specifically to research a ship. There are plenty of other, more expensive books out there with stunning attention to detail. This is more an enjoyable and sometimes informative look at all the world's battleships.

I bought Jane's Fighting Ships of WW1 a few weeks ago and I much prefer this book, the photographs are many times better than the sketchy, badly reproduced diagrams in the former. Now if only somebody would produce a book on battleships that combined the aesthetics and photo quality of this book, the line drawings in R.A Burt and W. Garzke's volumes and the detail of Alan Raven's books I, for one, would most certainly be putting my money down!

This book would make a great gift for a youth with an interest in battleships and, I think, would provide hours of enjoyment and be a regular reference...
Simple fellow
I'll echo the sentiments of other reviewers: Peter Hore's "Battleships" isn't the most factually sound book out there, but it's nonetheless a great overview and good value. Plenty of pictures and histories abound in this title and it's very useful for looking up some quick photos and tonnages on certain vessels.

Perhaps the best aspect of the book is the amount of information given for Pre-Dreadnoughts (my personal favorites) and World War I vessels. WW2 ships already have an overabundance of information published on them, but for enthusiasts longing for photos and information on early battleships at a price that won't break the bank, this book really delivers.
TheMoonix
While this book does have a suprising number of photos that are not usually found in other publications, the technical data is rife with errors, even to the point of contradicting itself from one page, or even paragraph, to the next. Great for pictures, but don't buy this if you are looking for any new nuggets of information (or even to attempt to corraborate any ones you might have in other publications). I'm not sure if the problem was shoddy research, or poor editing, or a combination of the two.
Related to Battleships
Marxism in the United States of America: 1870 to the Present Day eBook
Fb2 Marxism in the United States of America: 1870 to the Present Day ePub
Work Machines - Reproducible Pages Plus Teacher Guide - Grades 4, 5, 6 (Work Machines) eBook
Fb2 Work  Machines - Reproducible Pages Plus Teacher Guide - Grades 4, 5, 6 (Work  Machines) ePub
Jane's Battleships of the 20th Century eBook
Fb2 Jane's Battleships of the 20th Century ePub
The World's Great Battleships: From the Middle Ages to the Present eBook
Fb2 The World's Great Battleships: From the Middle Ages to the Present ePub
Battleships (World War 2 fact files) eBook
Fb2 Battleships (World War 2 fact files) ePub
Battleships (World War Two Fact Files) eBook
Fb2 Battleships (World War Two Fact Files) ePub
Fantastic Four: The Life Fantastic eBook
Fb2 Fantastic Four: The Life Fantastic ePub
Using Ramps and Wedges (Raintree Perspectives: Machines Inside Machines) (Raintree Perspectives: Machines Inside Machines) eBook
Fb2 Using Ramps and Wedges (Raintree Perspectives: Machines Inside Machines) (Raintree Perspectives: Machines Inside Machines) ePub
The City That Never Was: Two Hundred Years of Fantastic and Fascinating Plans That Might Have Changed the Face of New York City eBook
Fb2 The City That Never Was: Two Hundred Years of Fantastic and Fascinating Plans That Might Have Changed the Face of New York City ePub