» » Selected Poems of Anna Akhmatova

Fb2 Selected Poems of Anna Akhmatova ePub

by Anna Akhmatova,Anna Andreevna Gorenko

Subcategory: Different
Author: Anna Akhmatova,Anna Andreevna Gorenko
ISBN: 5885909555
ISBN13: 978-5885909556
Language: Russian
Publisher: Harvest (January 1, 2004)
Pages: 638
Fb2 eBook: 1570 kb
ePub eBook: 1549 kb
Digital formats: rtf lrf txt mobi

Akhmatova, whose real surname was Gorenko, is one of the two greatest women poets in the history of Russian poetry.

Akhmatova, whose real surname was Gorenko, is one of the two greatest women poets in the history of Russian poetry. The daughter of a merchant marine engineer, she spent much of her childhood in Tsarskoye Selo, the village outside St. Petersburg where the Tsar's summer palace was located. The regal nature of her work is perhaps in part attributable to this royal environment. Her first books of poetry, Vecher (Evening) (1912) and Chyotki (Rosary) (1913; reissued eleven times), brought her critical acclaim. From 1910 to 1918 she was married to Nikolay Gumilev.

Anna Andreyevna Gorenko (23 June 1889 – 5 March 1966), better known by the pen name Anna Akhmatova (/ɑːkˈmɑːtɔːvə/; Russian: Анна Ахматова, IPA: ), was one of the most significant Soviet Russian poets of the 20th century

Anna Andreyevna Gorenko (23 June 1889 – 5 March 1966), better known by the pen name Anna Akhmatova (/ɑːkˈmɑːtɔːvə/; Russian: Анна Ахматова, IPA: ), was one of the most significant Soviet Russian poets of the 20th century. She was shortlisted for the Nobel Prize in 1965 and received second-most (three) nominations for the award the following year.

She was born Anna Andreevna Gorenko on June 11, 1889 in Bol’shoi . Sonia Ketchian, The Poetry of Anna Akhmatova: A Conquest of Time and Space (Munich: Otto Sagner, 1986).

She was born Anna Andreevna Gorenko on June 11, 1889 in Bol’shoi Fontan, near the Black Sea, the third of six children in an upper-class family.

Anna Akhmatova is the literary pseudonym of Anna Andreevna Gorenko. Her first husband was Gumilev, and she too became one of the leading Acmeist poets. Her second book of poems, Beads (1914), brought her fame. Her earlier manner, intimate and colloquial, gradually gave way to a more classical severity, apparent in her volumes The Whte Flock (1917) and Anno Domini MCMXXI (1922).

Start by marking Selected Poems of Anna Akhmatova as Want to Read . Anna Andreevna Gorenko.

Start by marking Selected Poems of Anna Akhmatova as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Akhmatova's work ranges from short lyric poems to universalized, ingeniously structured cycles, such as Requiem (1935-40), her tragic masterpiece about the Stalinist terror. Her work addresses a variety of theme Also known as: Анна Ахматова, Anna Ahmatova, Anna Achmatowa.

Browse through Anna Akhmatova's poems and quotes. Anna Andreyevna Gorenko, better known by the pen name Anna Akhmatova, was a Russian and Soviet modernist poet, one of the most acclaimed writers in the Russian canon

Browse through Anna Akhmatova's poems and quotes. 83 poems of Anna Akhmatova. Anna Andreyevna Gorenko, better known by the pen name Anna Akhmatova, was a Russian and Soviet modernist poet, one of the most acclaimed writers in the Russian canon. Akhmatova's work ranges from short lyric poems to intricately structured cycles, such as Requiem (1935–40), her tragic masterpiece about the Stalinist terror. Her style, characterised by its economy and emotional restraint, was strikingly original and distinctive to her contemporaries.

Anna Akhmatova, Russian poet recognized at her death as the greatest woman poet in Russian literature. Alternative Titles: Anna Andreevna Akhmatova, Anna Andreyevna Gorenko. Akhmatova began writing verse at age 11 and at 21 joined a group of St. Petersburg poets, the Acmeists, whose leader, Nikolay Gumilyov, she married in 1910. Anna Akhmatova, pseudonym of Anna Andreyevna Gorenko, (born June 11, 1889, Bolshoy Fontan, near Odessa, Ukraine, Russian Empire-died March 5, 1966, Domodedovo, near Moscow, Russia, . Russian poet recognized at her death as the greatest woman poet in Russian literature.

Anna Akhmatova was born Anna Gorenko in 1888 and died in 1966. A popular poet of the Acmeist school, she took a pseudonym when her upper-class father objected to her "decadent" choice of career. She was married to the Acmeist poet Gumilev from 1910 until 1918, and spent time in Paris, where she posed nude for Modigliani. After the Revolution, Akhmatova remained silent for two decades. Her ex-husband was executed in 1921, their son was imprisoned for sixteen years, and her third husband died in a Siberian prison camp.

Comments to eBook Selected Poems of Anna Akhmatova
Na
Valuable book .greatservice
Usishele
Latest translation. Includes best from major works. More poetic unike earlier ones.
Akirg
Good service

excellent price for this very good translation of Ann Akhmatova's work - the best we know of, according to one Russian speaker
Jairani
I received the lovely Folio Society edition of the Selected Poems of Anna Akhmatova as a gift and was moved deeply. It was the first reading I had done of the works of this Russian poet. This edition has a history that is worth mentioning. In 1985, Ohio University Press published the Selected Poems with translations by D.M. Thomas under the title "You Will Hear Thunder." Vintage republished the book in 2009, and it remains available in an inexpensive paperback. The Folio Society published its edition in 2016. It consists of the Thomas translation and notes on the poems together with a new introduction by Elimear McBride. The book comes in a slipcase, is a joy to read and hold, and includes seven illustrations and photographs. It is expensive but a wonderful book to own and to receive as a gift.

The book includes a selection of Akhmatova's (1889 -- 1966) poetry from 1909 through the early 1960s. Her work is both intimate, expressivist, and personal and also gives a deeply poetical response to the wars and terrors of the first half of the Twentieth Century, including both World Wars, the Russian Revolution, and the terrors and purges of Communism. Akhmatova lived and suffered through them.

The Selected Poems includes works from seven collections; "Evening", "Rosary", "White Flock", "Plantain", "Anno Domini", "Reed" and "The Seventh Book" together with two great long works, "Requiem" and the "Poem Without a Hero." In her earlier works, Akhmatova became recognized as a major figure in the "Silver Age" of Russian literature in the years just before the Revolution. Her poems from this period tend to be short. They focus on her unhappy relationship with her first husband, killed by the communists in 1921 and with her lovers. The poems describe places in Old Russia, tend to be concentrated, and are full of lyricism and passion.

Following the Russian Revolution, the passion continues. Akhmatova, her former husband, and her son, suffered continued pressure and persecution from the new regime. Her poems continue to describe her life and her love affairs and also assume a political tone of the sufferings engendered by wars and by communism. For many years, Akhmatova was forbidden to publish and her poems were recited and preserved by memory.

The long poem "Requiem" depicts the experience of the poet and of countless others during the Soviet purges of 1937 -- 1938. In her introduction, Akhmatova writes:

"In the fearful years of the Yezov terror I spent seventeen months in prison queues in Leningrad. One day somebody 'identified me. Besides me, in the queue, there was a woman with blue lips. She had, of course, never heard of me; but she suddenly come out of that trance so common to us all and whispered in my ear (everybody spoke in whispers there): 'Can you describe this?' And I said 'Yes, I can.' And then something like the shadow of a smile crossed what had once been her face."

This long poem is moving and accessible. Akhmatova did indeed describe the scene, as she told her fell0w-prisoner she could.

The long "Poem without a Hero", while also moving and deeply personal, is modernist and often opaque. It includes many literary allusions and allusions to the poet's own life. The details and the individual sections of the work frequently are spare and taut. The poem describes the Siege of Leningrad. In the process, Ahkmatova reflects on her own life, on earlier history, and on the tragedies of the Twentieth Century. She wrote: "I frequently hear of certain absurd interpretations of 'Poem without a Hero'. And I have been advised to make it clearer. This I decline to do. It contains no third, seventh, or twenty-ninth thoughts. I shall neither explain nor change anything. What is written is written." The poem shows, among other things, the influence of the poetry of T.S. Elliott.

In additional to the personal poems and the historical meditations, many of Akhmatova's poems describe figures such as Sophocles, Dante, Beatrice, Rachel, Lot's Wife, and Cleopatra. Here is a late poem, "Last Rose", written in 1962 that Akhmatova read to Robert Frost during his visit to the Soviet Union.

"Bowing down to the ground with Morozova,
Dancing with the head of a lover,
Flying from Dido's Pyre in smoke
To burn with Joan at the stake --

Lord! can't you see I'm weary
Of this rising and dying and living.
Take it all, but once more bring me close
To sense the freshness of this crimson rose,"

I was glad to get to know something of Akhmatova through the thoughtful gift of this Folio Society book. Readers without the good fortune of the gift, may make the gift of the poet's acquaintance in the earlier Vintage paperback edition of her selected poems.

Robin Friedman
Rainbearer
I received the lovely Folio Society edition of the Selected Poems of Anna Akhmatova as a gift and was moved deeply. It was the first reading I had done of the works of this Russian poet. This edition has a history that is worth mentioning, particularly because the Folio Society book is not listed on Amazon as I write this review. In 1985, Ohio University Press published the Selected Poems with translations by D.M. Thomas under the title "You Will Hear Thunder." Vintage republished the book in 2009, and it remains available in an inexpensive paperback edition. The Folio Society published its edition in 2016. It consists of the Thomas translation and notes on the poems together with a new introduction by Elimear McBride. The book comes in a slipcase, is a joy to read and hold, and includes seven illustrations and photographs. It is expensive but a wonderful book to own and to receive as a gift.

The book in both the Folio Society edition and in this Vintage paperback includes a selection of Akhmatova's (1889 -- 1966) poetry from 1909 through the early 1960s. Her work is both intimate, expressivist, and personal and also gives a deeply poetical response to the wars and terrors of the first half of the Twentieth Century, including both World Wars, the Russian Revolution, and the terrors and purges of Communism. Akhmatova lived and suffered through them.

The Selected Poems includes works from seven collections; "Evening", "Rosary", "White Flock", "Plantain", "Anno Domini", "Reed" and "The Seventh Book" together with two great long works, "Requiem" and the "Poem Without a Hero." In her earlier works, Akhmatova became recognized as a major figure in the "Silver Age" of Russian literature in the years just before the Revolution. Her poems from this period tend to be short. They focus on her unhappy relationship with her first husband, killed by the communists in 1921 and with her lovers. The poems describe places in Old Russia, tend to be concentrated, and are full of lyricism and passion.

Following the Russian Revolution, the passion continues. Akhmatova, her former husband, and her son, suffered continued pressure and persecution from the new regime. Her poems continue to describe her life and her love affairs and also assume a political tone of the sufferings engendered by wars and by communism. For many years, Akhmatova was forbidden to publish and her poems were recited and preserved by memory.

The long poem "Requiem" depicts the experience of the poet and of countless others during the Soviet purges of 1937 -- 1938. In her introduction, Akhmatova writes:

"In the fearful years of the Yezov terror I spent seventeen months in prison queues in Leningrad. One day somebody 'identified me. Besides me, in the queue, there was a woman with blue lips. She had, of course, never heard of me; but she suddenly come out of that trance so common to us all and whispered in my ear (everybody spoke in whispers there): 'Can you describe this?' And I said 'Yes, I can.' And then something like the shadow of a smile crossed what had once been her face."

This long poem is moving and accessible. Akhmatova did indeed describe the scene, as she told her fell0w-prisoner she could.

The long "Poem without a Hero", while also moving and deeply personal, is modernist and often opaque. It includes many literary allusions and allusions to the poet's own life. The details and the individual sections of the work frequently are spare and taut. The poem describes the Siege of Leningrad. In the process, Ahkmatova reflects on her own life, on earlier history, and on the tragedies of the Twentieth Century. She wrote: "I frequently hear of certain absurd interpretations of 'Poem without a Hero'. And I have been advised to make it clearer. This I decline to do. It contains no third, seventh, or twenty-ninth thoughts. I shall neither explain nor change anything. What is written is written." The poem shows, among other things, the influence of the poetry of T.S. Elliott.

In additional to the personal poems and the historical meditations, many of Akhmatova's poems describe figures such as Sophocles, Dante, Beatrice, Rachel, Lot's Wife, and Cleopatra. Here is a late poem, "Last Rose", written in 1962 that Akhmatova read to Robert Frost during his visit to the Soviet Union.

"Bowing down to the ground with Morozova,
Dancing with the head of a lover,
Flying from Dido's Pyre in smoke
To burn with Joan at the stake --

Lord! can't you see I'm weary
Of this rising and dying and living.
Take it all, but once more bring me close
To sense the freshness of this crimson rose,"

I was glad to get to know something of Akhmatova through the thoughtful gift of the Folio Society book. Readers without the good fortune of the gift, may make the gift of the poet's acquaintance in the earlier Vintage paperback edition of her selected poems.

Robin Friedman
Related to Selected Poems of Anna Akhmatova
Poems : New and Selected eBook
Fb2 Poems : New and Selected ePub
Peretz Miransky: Selected Poems Fables: An English/Yiddish Collection eBook
Fb2 Peretz Miransky: Selected Poems  Fables: An English/Yiddish Collection ePub
Socinenija: V Dvuch Tomach 2, Proza, Perevody (Volume 2) (Russian Edition) eBook
Fb2 Socinenija: V Dvuch Tomach 2, Proza, Perevody (Volume 2) (Russian Edition) ePub
For Anna Akhmatova and other poems eBook
Fb2 For Anna Akhmatova and other poems ePub
The Shifting Web: New and Selected Poems eBook
Fb2 The Shifting Web: New and Selected Poems ePub
The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova eBook
Fb2 The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova ePub
Telegrams from the Metropole: Selected Poems 1980-1998: Selected Poems, 1980-1998 eBook
Fb2 Telegrams from the Metropole: Selected Poems 1980-1998: Selected Poems, 1980-1998 ePub
Selected Poems eBook
Fb2 Selected Poems ePub
100 Selected Poems of Anna Maria Lenngren eBook
Fb2 100 Selected Poems of Anna Maria Lenngren ePub