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ISBN: 0440515491
ISBN13: 978-0440515494
Language: English
Publisher: Dell Publishing Company; First Delta Printing edition
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Crazy Talk, Stupid Talk (Delta Book). ISBN13:9780440515494. Release Date:January 1984.

Crazy Talk, Stupid Talk" . is not in what it does for you but in what it does to you. One should, each day, try to hear a little song, read a good poem, see a fine picture, and, if it is possible, speak a few reasonable words. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. The media scholar and social critic Neil Postman once penned a work titled Crazy Talk, Stupid Talk. The book sounds more like a mass-market product than a serious scholarly work, but the catchy phrase does actually serve a useful purpose.

Yet another insightful talk by Delta Books author David Katz today at the Johannesburg Light Horse. He was hosted by the South African Military Intelligence Veterans Association (SAMIVA) and spoke about his book South Africans vs Rommel. The occasion was an informal meeting during the Angola/South West Africa negotiations. series of drawn-out peace-making conferences. When we were adjourning on 4 May, at the end of the conference, I received a personal message from Rosales: he wanted to talk to me. Privately.

Crazy Talk, Stupid Talk: How We Defeat Ourselves by the Way We Talk and What to Do About I. New York: Delta Book Publishing, 1966. The New English: A Forward Look. New York: Holt, Reinhart and Winston, 1965.

Crazy Talk, Stupid Talk: How We Defeat Ourselves by the Way We Talk and What to Do About It. New York: Delacorte Press, 1976. Teaching as a Subversive Activity. New York: Delta Book Publishing, 1971, . 969. New York: Holt, Reinhart and Winston, 1967.

Download free "Crazy talk, stupid talk, how we defeat ourselves bythe way we talk and what to do about it," by NeilĀ . This book describes the following items: Interpersonal Communication, Oral Communication United States, More about the author(s): Neil Postman was born in 8 March 1931.

Download free "Crazy talk, stupid talk, how we defeat ourselves bythe way we talk and what to do about it," by Neil Postman EPUB, MOBI, PDF, TXT, Kindle. Book description: Publisher: Includes index Date: 1976. Conscientious objections. Download more by: Neil Postman.

Crazy Talk, Stupid Talk (Delta Book)
Comments to eBook Crazy Talk, Stupid Talk (Delta Book)
Fordregelv
"Ernest Hemingway was once asked -- what is the most important quality of a great writer? Hemingway thought about it a long moment -- and then he said, 'What a writer needs more than anything else is a built in, shock-proof, crap detector.'" Wise words indeed in the age of "Fake News" and Donald Trump.

With this premise and others, Postman starts one of his most amusing and insightful early books, Crazy Talk, Stupid Talk. In this book, written back in 1976, the late professor Neil Postman examines every deceptive or misdirected pattern we habitually employ in using language to give form to our thoughts and to communicate with others. Crazy Talk Stupid Talk takes on the monumental task of examining errors in logic that occur in our language and thus in our thinking.

Grabbing hold of words in this way may seem like wrestling a greased pig, and the subject is full of ambiguity and complexity, but in undertaking the endeavor of identifying stupid talk and crazy talk, Postman has modeled his approach to language after that of doctors and lawyers. When you go to a doctor, it's not because you're seeking advice about good health. A doctor is usually going to ask, "Well, what's the trouble?"

Another important foundation in examining irrational forms of talk, according to Postman, is that language and communication never take place in a vacuum. "If communication is to happen, we require not merely messages, but an ordered situation in which messages can assume meaning," he says, in other words, a "semantic environment".

I love Postman's funny examples of stupid and crazy talk. Here is one:

"When Lynette Squeaky Fromme was sentenced to life imprisonment for attempting to assassinate President Gerald Ford, she said 'I want Manson out. I want a world of peace'. Considering the hideous circumstances by which Manson came to be imprisoned, and considering what most people mean by peace, you might say Miss Fromme exhibited an almost wondrous creativity in putting those two sentences together."

But aside from the often amusing examples in this book, some of Postman's finest moments come as he analyzes 17 beliefs, habits of speech, and structural characteristics of language people use which play an indispensable role in the production of nonsense. What we have here, in short, is a catalog of irrational behavior that is amusingly entertaining, and yet also invaluable. Let's take a look at a few of these methods of madness, among them Eichmannism, definition tyranny, sloganeering, and fanaticism.

Communication as Panacea -- "The mistaken idea that all problems arise through a lack of communication. Silence, reticence, restraint and even dishonesty can be a virtue under certain circumstances. Freud teaches us that civilization is NOT possible without inhibition -- that civilization IS possible only when people keep feelings to themselves -- feelings not relevant to the situation at hand."

Here's another one: Fanaticism -- "Fanaticism has many faces, not all of them violent or hysterical." What you will find most intriguing about the chapter on fanaticism is that all fanatical beliefs are self-confirming. Even fish can have fanatical beliefs -- as demonstrated in the opening of this chapter. Marxism, psychoanalysis, astrology, sensitivity training and most forms of mysticism and superstition are among the fauna and flora of fanaticism, according to Postman. (If you are an astrologer, you may have your belief challenged as Postman dissects the astrology column in the daily paper!) Such beliefs are, in Postman's opinion, fanatical not because they are false, but because the beliefs are expressed in a such a way that they can never be proven false.

Again, the relevance of these ideas in the age of Trump is astonishing and very prescient.

And then there's Reification. Reification means confusing things with the names of things. "This is a most seductive form of stupid and crazy talk, since it's origins are deeply imbedded in the structure of language itself." This is Postman at his best.

And what does Postman have to say about propaganda? Is it important to know which propaganda is good and which is bad? There are some stunning, stunning quotes here, such as...
"George Orwell whispers troublesome words in our ears -- that 'political language is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable''."

Here is a subtle definition of propaganda that Postman has come up with: "Propaganda is language that invites us to respond emotionally, emphatically, more or less immediately, and in an either or manner.

"It is NOT language that stimulates curiosity, reveals it's assumptions, causes us to ask questions, invites us to seek further information and to search for error." AWESOME!

The mastery of language has many dimensions, and Crazy Talk Stupid Talk takes an almost scientific approach to skepticism and critical thinking with robust humor and probing insight. An indispensable and far-sighted book-- tragically out of print and most especially NOT available in a KINDLE EDITION! If there was ANY book in the world right now I would wish to be in a searchable Kindle edition, in the age of Trump, this would be the one.
Lemana
This was the 2nd book I've read by Postman. I really like the way he thinks and writes. I think his ideas withstand the test of time because they are 30-40 years old but are still relevant and desperately needed in our culture today. This book is highly recommended.
Kieel
This is a great book!! it is a philosophical approach to language for not philosophers, so it is profound, clear and innovative.
Doriel
I read this book in 1976 when it was published, and later bought extra copies to share with friends. It was the first and best book I ever read about learning to think critically, especially about what I read or hear. It might be dull or boring to people who have studied logic and semantics - the author took these complex topics normally encountered only by philosophy majors at a university, and presents them in a fun and simplified way for anyone curious about how minds work, words incite, people manipulate deliberately or we unknowingly deliberate others and ourselves by drawing faulty conclusions or reacting to emotional appeals.

The book taught me to recognize when someone is trying to manipulate and it showed me how I manipulated myself without even being aware of how my faulty thought processes led to faulty choices.

It reveals the techniques and errors in logic that lead people to false conclusions. It changed the way I watch news, speak to my relatives, listen to politicians and religious figures. Those lessons have spared me trouble I otherwise might have blindly stumbled into the past four decades, and helped me out of trouble when I was near sighted and fell into groups with strange paradigms.

It might be hard to find or costly to buy, but it's worth it!
Trash Obsession
"Ernest Hemingway was once asked -- what is the most important quality of a great writer? Hemingway thought about it a long moment -- and then he said, what a writer needs more than anything else is a built in, shock-proof, crap detector."

With this premise and others, Postman starts one of his most amusing and insightful early books, Crazy Talk, Stupid Talk. In this book, written back in 1976, the late professor Neil Postman examines every deceptive or misdirected pattern we habitually employ in using language to give form to our thoughts and to communicate with others. Crazy Talk Stupid Talk takes on the monumental task of examining errors in logic that occur in our language and thus in our thinking.

Grabbing hold of words in this way may seem like wrestling a greased pig, and the subject is full of ambiguity and complexity, but in undertaking the endeavor of identifying stupid talk and crazy talk, Postman has modelled his approach to language after that of doctors and lawyers. When you go to a doctor, it's not because you're seeking advice about good health. A doctor is usually going to ask, "Well, what's the trouble?"

Another important foundation in examining irrational forms of talk, according to Postman, is that language and communication never take place in a vacuum. "If communication is to happen, we require not merely messages, but an ordered situation in which messages can assume meaning," he says, in other words, a "semantic environment".

I love Postman's funny examples of stupid and crazy talk. Here is one:

"When Lynette Squeaky Fromme was sentenced to life imprisonment for attempting to assassinate President Gerald Ford, she said 'I want Manson out. I want a world of peace'. Considering the hideous circumstances by which Manson came to be imprisoned, and considering what most people mean by peace, you might say Miss Fromme exhibited an almost wondrous creativity in putting those two sentences together."

But aside from the often amusing examples in this book, some of Postman's finest moments come as he analyzes 17 beliefs, habits of speech, and structural characteristics of language people use which play an indispensable role in the production of nonsense. What we have here, in short, is a catalog of irrational behavior that is amusingly entertaining, and yet also invaluable. Let's take a look at a few of these methods of madness, among them Eichmannism, definition tyranny, sloganeering, and fanaticism.

Communication as Panacea -- "the mistaken idea that all problems arise through a lack of communication. Silence, reticence, restraint and even dishonesty can be a virtue under certain circumstances. Freud teaches us that civilization is NOT possible without inhibition -- that civilization IS possible only when people keep feelings to themselves -- feelings not relevant to the situation at hand."

Here's another one: Fanaticism -- "Fanaticism has many faces, not all of them violent or hysterical." What you will find most intriguing about the chapter on fanaticism is that all fanatical beliefs are self-confirming. Even fish can have fanatical beliefs -- as demonstrated in the opening of this chapter. Marxism, psychoanalysis, astrology, sensitivity training and most forms of mysticism and superstition are among the fauna and flora of fanaticism, according to Postman. (If you are an astrologer, you may have your belief challenged as Postman dissects the astrology column in the daily paper!) Such beliefs are, in Postman's opinion, fanatical not because they are false, but because the beliefs are expressed in a such a way that they can never be proven false.

And then there's Reification. Reification means confusing things with the names of things. "This is a most seductive form of stupid and crazy talk, since it's origins are deeply imbedded in the structure of language itself." This is Postman at his best.

And what does Postman have to say about propaganda? Is it important to know which propaganda is good and which is bad? There are some stunning, stunning quotes here, such as...
"George Orwell whispers troublesome words in our ears -- that 'political language is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable'"

Here is a subtle definition of propaganda that Postman has come up with: "Propaganda is language that invites us to respond emotionally, emphatically, more or less immediately, and in an either or manner.

"It is NOT language that stimulates curiosity, reveals it's assumptions, causes us to ask questions, invites us to seek further information and to search for error." AWESOME!

The mastery of language has many dimensions, and Crazy Talk Stupid Talk takes an almost scientific approach to skepticism and critical thinking with robust humor and probing insight. An indispensable book!
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