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Fb2 Nightfall at Nauvoo ePub

by Samuel W. Taylor

Subcategory: Different
Author: Samuel W. Taylor
ISBN: 0380002477
ISBN13: 978-0380002474
Language: English
Publisher: Avon Books (February 1, 1974)
Fb2 eBook: 1761 kb
ePub eBook: 1177 kb
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Nightfall at Nauvoo book. This novel by Samuel W. Taylor is about the Mormon’s building and then leaving the beautiful city of Nauvoo.

Nightfall at Nauvoo book. The author deals mostly with the men. Mormon converts, believers, leaders, the disillusioned, and the apostates. Gentile friends, sympathizers, political opponents and enemies. Taylor explores possible motives for various actions including faith, political schemes, revenge, self aggrandizement, and greed. Most of his character sketches seem plausible. Another book in my fathers bookcase.

Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13: 9780380002474.

Nauvoo meant beautiful

Nauvoo meant beautiful. However this interval was anything but lovely as they were first greeted there by an epidemic ague, as dissension accelerated from with in (""Man's foes, are of his own house""), as the articulation of the angel-directed commandment to take many wives was a chronic sore which finally came to an open head, as Joseph

Nightfall at Nauvoo, New York: Macmillan, 1971. Raymond and Samuel Taylor Correspondence in the Special Collections & Archives of Utah State University.

Nightfall at Nauvoo, New York: Macmillan, 1971. The Kingdom or Nothing, New York: Macmillan, 1976, ISBN 0026166003. republished as The Last Pioneer, Signature Books, 1999, ISBN 1-56085-115-5). Taylor-made Tales, Murray, Utah: Aspen Books, 1994, ISBN 1-56236-216-X. The John Taylor Family Papers in the J. Willard Marriott Library Special Collections of the University of Utah. Works by or about Samuel W. Taylor in libraries (WorldCat catalog). Samuel W. Taylor at Find a Grave.

Author Samuel W. Taylor. New York: Macmillan, 1971. In this latest of several books based on the Mormon experience, Samuel Taylor has perhaps aspired higher than in any of his previous efforts.

Book by Taylor, Samuel Woolley. For fiction even truer to reality, have a look at Nightfall at Nauvoo.

Home Taylor, Samuel W. Nightfall at Nauvoo. Signed by author on title page. Samuel Taylor provides the reader with an unparalleled chapter in American westward migration. From the dust jacket- "In 1839 a Holy City of exiles rose from the fever-ridden swamps of Commerce, Illinois. Within three years Nauvoo, the 'beautiful place,' had become a metropolis- a self-contained city-state with its own courts, judges, laws, and militia, and the power to elect local, county, and state officials. Seven years later, Nauvoo lay abandoned, its Mormon citizens once again westward wanderers.

Nightfall at Nauvoo, New York: Macmillan, 1971 ISBN 0-380-00247-7. Taylor, Samuel W. (1994), Taylor-Made Tales, Salt Lake City: Aspen Books,. Rocky Mountain Empire, New York: Macmillan, 1978, ISBN 0026166100. The John Taylor Papers (2 vols. Redwood City, Cal: Taylor Trust, 1984. Taylor: Talented Native Son - biography by Jean R. Paulson (August 1998).

Taylor was the son of John Whittaker Taylor, a member of the Quorum of the . The Kingdom or Nothing" (republished as "The Last Pioneer", Signature Books, 1999, ISBN 1-56085-115-5) "I Have Six Wives" (based on the life o. .

Taylor was the son of John Whittaker Taylor, a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1884 to 1904, and a grandson of LDS President John Taylor. In contrast to the serious nature of these films, Samuel W. Taylor was also the author of the short stories on which the Disney movies "The Absent Minded Professor", "Flubber", and "Son of Flubber" were based. The Kingdom or Nothing" (republished as "The Last Pioneer", Signature Books, 1999, ISBN 1-56085-115-5) "I Have Six Wives" (based on the life of Rulon C. Allred) "Nightfall at Nauvoo", ISBN 0-380-00247-7.

Samuel W. Taylor, grandson of John Taylor and son of Apostle John W. Taylor, was born in Provo, Utah, and . Taylor, was born in Provo, Utah, and studied at Brigham Young University. After serving in World War II, he and his family lived near San Francisco until he passed away in 1997 at the age of ninety

From review - "Sam Taylor was one of the very best writers of Mormonism's "Lost Generation": a group that co-existed roughly at the same time as Hemingway and that cohort and had ambivalent feelings about their Mormon heritage. "Nightfall at Nauvoo" is Taylor's masterpiece. It's the story of the church from the 1838 Missouri period to Joseph Smith's assassination in Illinois in 1844."
Comments to eBook Nightfall at Nauvoo
Slowly writer
I met the author in the Provo, Utah Library years ago when he was working on this novel, which is also one of the best histories of Nauvoo, Illinois that I have ever found. It is a novel which puts words into the mouths of long dead residents of that city when it was being built by the members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, better known as the Mormons. Sam was the grandson of John Taylor who, as a Mormon apostle helped develop and build Nauvoo and was later the third President of the Mormon Church. If you want to learn more about the Mormons this is a good place to start. In this book, he tells things as they really were and literally transports the reader back to the time period of 1839 to 1846.
I have several copies, both Hard and Paperback, which have become much more difficult to find. I treasure them.

Sam was a prolific writer who perhaps is most famous for creating FLUBBER in several of his novels.
Drelahuginn
My mother read this years ago and wanted to read it again. The book is well written and as we live in IL and have been to Nauvoo several times, it's easy to picture. As I write this she is engrossed in it. She stated its hard to "read a real book again" (she has a tablet) but it's worth it.

Trust me....that's high praise.
Usaxma
Samule W. Taylor has done an outstanding job of merging fact and fiction in Nightfall at Nauvoo. I am a lifelong Mormon and a history buff, and truly appreciate the way Taylor presents a balanced picture of what life was truly like in Nauvoo during the time the Church members were there. This is definitely not "faith promoting" history, but telling the truth as accurately and fairly as one can.
Jugami
Great read, llike history back fence gossip.
Went Tyu
Great Book, Great Historian.....
Every LDS, who is interested in Her/His heritage should read this book. Great Nostalgia.
Dukinos
I remember picking up a paperback copy of this book years ago simply because it had a chilling picture of some covered wagons leaving a town during a snow bound winter, and the title added to the ominous impression. My thought was "Why would anyone travel in those conditions?" I was soon to find out. This book was first published as a hardback by Macmillan Company of New York, New York in 1971, and it drew me into one of the most exciting, colorful, and extraordinary true stories that was ever recorded about the wild West during the 1840s. It's a good thing no one had told me that this was about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, popularly known as the Mormons, because had I known that I would have thought "Oh, Oh, religion," and not given it any further investigation. I came from a Catholic background, and I didn't really think about it until later, but the Mormon church was the other important organization responsible for settling the West. Once a person has this insight, they won't be surprised when encountering entire shelf loads of books about Mormons in bookstores run by folks who actually know something about Western Americana. What you have in this book is the story of a town built by the Mormons in Illinois, and how controversies arose there which resulted in the death of Joseph Smith, the founder of the church. Now I'm not going to spoil it for you by filling in too much, but after Joseph Smith was killed at Carthage, just outside Nauvoo, his church split into a number of competitive factions. The largest of these, the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, is based in Salt Lake City, Utah. The second largest one, the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, is headquartered in Independence, Missouri. There were other factions which came out of the incidents in this story as well, but the largest are usually the most familiar. This story will introduce you to the controversies that go on to this day between many Mormon sects - and also between Mormons and the outside world. It will give you an understanding of why there are so many people hooked on collecting anything they can about Mormon splinter groups, or anything published by those sects. In fact, the culture of Mormon politics is exciting enough to quench the thirst of anyone already hooked on political ideology or more familiar forms of religious theology. Imagine a true story which is partly a nerve wracking wild West shoot out, and blend that with the scattering seeds of a peculiar religion, and you've got some idea of the riveting read you're in for. Nightfall At Nauvoo is the reason I'll usually stop to examine any book about LDS (Mormonism), and it's also the reason I nearly always find the time to say hello to their missionaries. It is a great story by a great writer, on the same level of importance as Jim Bishop's The Day Lincoln Was Shot; Bernal Diaz's Conquest of New Spain - about Cortes bringing down the Aztec empire; and William Connelley's perfect telling of Quantrills destruction of Lawrence Kansas. Some readers may even appreciate that it has similar elements.
Vudozilkree
Sam Taylor was one of the very best writers of Mormonism's "Lost Generation": a group that co-existed roughly at the same time as Hemingway and that cohort and had ambivalent feelings about their Mormon heritage. "Nightfall at Nauvoo" is Taylor's masterpiece. It's the story of the church from the 1838 Missouri period to Joseph Smith's assassination in Illinois in 1844. It could be called a historical novel, but it mixes straight history with fictionalized narrative, much like the other books in this trilogy, "The Last Pioneer" and "Rocky Mountain Empire". The effect (and tone) is not unlike like that of Tom Wolfe. Taylor loves his people but can't restrain his satirical bent. The result is a mixture of reverence and realism that is unique in Mormon literature. This is an epic story well told, and should be interesting to anyone who enjoys Western American history.
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