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Fb2 Chapters in a Mythology: The Poetry of Sylvia Plath ePub

by Judith Kroll

Subcategory: Different
Author: Judith Kroll
ISBN: 0060905891
ISBN13: 978-0060905897
Language: English
Publisher: HarperCollins (paper); 1st edition (January 1978)
Fb2 eBook: 1831 kb
ePub eBook: 1410 kb
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This book interprets Sylvia Plath's poetry in terms of two influences: the painter Giorgio di Chirico and .

This book interprets Sylvia Plath's poetry in terms of two influences: the painter Giorgio di Chirico and Robert Graves' The White Goddess. The author makes the validity of her interpretation very clear. Sylvia's interest in psychology led her to read the work of Carl Jung and her husband Ted Hughes introduced her to the book "The White Goddess: A Historical Grammar Of Poetic Myth" by Robert Graves which is a study of the mythological and psychological sources of poetry in paganism.

Chapters in a Mythology book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Chapters in a Mythology: The Poetry of Sylvia Plath as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Selected bibliography of sources cited from the work of Sylvia Plath: pages 281-285. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on March 26, 2013.

Chapters in a mythology. the poetry of Sylvia Plath. 1st ed. by Judith Kroll. Selected bibliography of sources cited from the work of Sylvia Plath": p. 281-285. Bibliography: p. 286-290. Published 1976 by Harper & Row in New York.

Near Fine in Fine DJ. Brief, neat ink gift inscription on blank bottom of attributions page at front of book ISBN: 0060124571 (Plath, Sylvia, Criticism). Other Products from hartmannbooks (View All). Hughes, Owen, and Jurgeit, Bernice. In Tiger's Reach: National Parks & Reserves Of Tasmania.

Judith Kroll is the author of Chapters in a Mythology: The Poetry of Sylvia Plath (Harper & Row, 1976), which was the first full-length critical study of Plath. She also contributed the biographical entry on Plath for Notable American Women (Harvard University Press, 1980); served as a consultant for the Plath segment in the PBS series Voices & Visions (1988); and in 1974 established the text for most of Plath’s Collected Poems

Books, images, historic newspapers, maps, archives and more.

Books, images, historic newspapers, maps, archives and more.

Connors, Kathleen, and Sally Bayley. Eye Rhymes: Sylvia Plath’s Art of the Visual. Oxford University Press, 2007. The Fading Smile: Poets in Boston from Robert Lowell to Sylvia Plath. Half-Remembered: A Personal History. Story Line Press, 1991. Education: Woman & Man at Yale. Lying, Despair, Jealousy, Envy, Sex, Suicide, Drugs, and the Good Life.

This mythology is brilliantly explored in Judith Kroll's book Chapters in a. Mythology: The Poetry of Sylvia Plath. shamans, and Holy men

This mythology is brilliantly explored in Judith Kroll's book Chapters in a. Judith Kroll speculates that Sylvia's genius lay in her. ability to explore the dark corners of her psyche. shamans, and Holy men. Hughes introduced Plath to the book The White Goddess: A Historical Grammar of. Poetic Myth by Robert Graves which is a study of the mythological and psychological. sources of poetry in paganism. Sylvia's interest in psychology led her to read the work of Carl.

Chapters in a Mythology: The Poetry of Sylvia Plath. These three books about Sylvia Plath have all been coming out within the space of a few months

Chapters in a Mythology: The Poetry of Sylvia Plath. These three books about Sylvia Plath have all been coming out within the space of a few months. They are not the first books on this subject, and they will not be the last.

Book by Kroll, Judith
Comments to eBook Chapters in a Mythology: The Poetry of Sylvia Plath
Xaluenk
This book interprets Sylvia Plath's poetry in terms of two influences: the painter Giorgio di Chirico and Robert Graves' The White Goddess. The author makes the validity of her interpretation very clear. "The Disquieting Muses" is both a painting by di Chirico and also a 1957 poem by Plath. Graves' system as presented in his book The White Goddess was introduced to her by Ted Hughes when he met her at Cambridge in 1956. Kroll's achievement is to show these influences in the poetry in detail.

As an influence, The White Goddess seems more important. This "Historical Grammar of Poetic Myth" was published by Graves in 1946. It is a lengthy exposition of the mythological system of a pre-classical matriarchal society in which the moon is the central symbol, with three phases of waxing, full, and waning, and corresponding to them, three colors, white, red, and black; and three stages of life, birth; love and war; and death and rebirth. The moon (a female) has a male consort who dies and whom she mourns, and a son who is also her lover. This is by no means the whole story. Graves' book explains the system in detail, and I was curious enough to read some of it. He rejects most English poetry as "classical", i.e., belonging to the post-matriarchal cultural system, and therefore second-rate; most of his attention is focused on Welsh poetry, and on a special alphabet, at which point I put his book aside. For him, poetry must create in the reader an unearthly thrill which classical poetry cannot achieve.

The importance of this book for understanding Plath's work is undeniable. But it is disquieting to find Kroll suggesting at the end that Plath's suicide was an attempted rebirth. Some involvement with Plath's personal circumstances would be hard for Kroll to leave out, since Plath saw herself as a captive of the myth, but of course nothing can be proved.
Rit
Great
Malojurus
"Chapters In A Mythology" reveals that Sylvia Plath was more interested in the psyche than her biographers suggest. Sylvia's interest in psychology led her to read the work of Carl Jung and her husband Ted Hughes introduced her to the book "The White Goddess: A Historical Grammar Of Poetic Myth" by Robert Graves which is a study of the mythological and psychological sources of poetry in paganism.

Ted Hughes suggests that Sylvia possessed the visionary faculty of a shaman, "In her poetry...she had free and controlled access to depths formerly reserved to the primitive ecstatic priests, shamans, and Holy men.." Judith Kroll explains Sylvia's fascination for the paintings of Giorgio de Chirico in the following terms, "For Sylvia Plath, the typical 'metaphysical' landscape provided a visual setting for the fixed, super-real, ominous, inaccessible drama of the psyche." She further praises Sylvia's "openness to contact with the unconscious are developed to an extraordinary degree." Kroll sees Sylvia's references to witches and Greek mythology as examples of paganism. For example, she argues that Sylvia viewed her nervous breakdown as a shaman's dismemberment and rebirth through ritual death of the psyche and recovery, "The dispersed 'stones' of the speaker's shattered self are gathered together and reconstructed, reenacting the myths of Dionysus (who is alluded to in 'Maenad'), Osiris, and other gods who undergo dismemberment and resurrection."

Kroll reveals that Sylvia Plath had read William James' book "Varieties of Religious Experience", "The Ten Principal Upanishads" by William Butler Yeats, "The Tibetan Book Of The Dead", and possibly some books on Zen Buddhism. Sylvia was interested in states of consciousness in which the mundane self is felt to die and a higher and larger self recovered. Therefore she was not morbidly interested in physical death but rather in ego death which permits a rebirth as a mystic in life. Although there is considerable evidence that Sylvia experienced brief moments of ecstasy such as may occur during the manic phase of a manic depressive illness, it seems unlikely that she reached the spiritual attainment of enlightenment or mystical union with the universe or God because such mystical experiences would have given her a reason to live.
Kefrannan
One of the theories of Plath's work presented in Knoll's book "Chapters in a Mythology" is that Plath's poems reflect the struggle between Plath's warring "true" and "false" selves. In the same way, Knoll seems to be trying to serve to masters when writing her book. She writes of working closely and very well with the Hughes estate, something which is almost unheard of, considering most critics and biographer's of Plath only come head-to-head against the estate's manipulation and tight grasp on the rights to Plath's works. One arguement is that too much of her work is being transformed into a feminist liberation cause that Plath herself never took up.
For Knoll, the temptation to put in some feminist criticism was too great, as it sneaks in here and there, as she deconstructs such poems as "Rabbit Catcher" and "Moon and the Yew Tree" in the way in which the Hughes estate sees fit, sneaking in feminist thinking between the lines. What comes through ends up being a muddied critique with conflicting ideas trying to support themselves with the same evidence at hand. Knoll, like Plath, was trying to server to masters in the authorship of this book. However, unlike her subject, Knoll was unable to sucessfully convey the meaning sufficantly for either side.
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