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Fb2 Report from a Chinese village (Pantheon village series) ePub

by Jan Myrdal

Subcategory: Different
Author: Jan Myrdal
ISBN: 0394748026
ISBN13: 978-0394748023
Language: English
Publisher: Pantheon Books; 1st Pantheon paperback ed edition (1981)
Pages: 373
Fb2 eBook: 1225 kb
ePub eBook: 1469 kb
Digital formats: lrf azw mobi rtf

Report from a Chinese Village book. As part of the great Pantheon series of books on communities around the world, Jan Myrdal's REPORT FROM A CHINESE VILLAGE stands out as a most powerful work.

Report from a Chinese Village book. Constructed largely as a series of interviews in Studs Terkel style with the villagers themselves, it does not attempt to present the "All-China" picture either from foreign eyes or from the Beijing government's point of view. The villagers of Liu Ling in northern Shensi province speak for themselves. At the end of speaking out, looking back.

com: Report from a Chinese Village: First printing. Report from a Chinese Village. Myrdal, Jan. Published by Pantheon, 1965. Condition: Near Fine Hardcover. From citynightsbooks (Allston, MA, . Maroon cloth binding, red/gilt titles and decoration, red topstain. DJ dated 6/65, H/H on CR page. With photo supplement on matte finish paper. Book and DJ in Mylar near fine.

Nimkoff, Meyer F. and Russel Middleton 1960 "Types of Family and Types of Economy. The American Journal of Sociology 66 : 215 : 225. The Family : Its Function and Destiny. New York : Harper and Row. This content downloaded from 14. 20. 67 on Sat, 13 Sep 2014 19:14:15 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions. 14 The Nuclear and theExtended Family Rodman, Hyman 1972 "Marital Power and the Theory of Resource in Cultural Context.

New York: Pantheon Books. WHEN, in 1960, the American journalist Edgar Snow revisited Yenan, where he had come to know Chinese Communist leaders intimately almost a quarter of a century before, he spent two days in a small outlying village, Liu Ling or Willow Grove. View Full Article in Timesmachine . Advertisement.

Report from a Chinese Village. Translated from the Swedish by Maurice Michael. New York: Pantheon Books, 1965. xxxiv, 374. Illustrations, Tables. Illustrations and photographs by Gun Kessle. Original title: Rapport från kinesisk. James D. Seymour (a1).

In the summer of 1962 Jan Myrdal, the thirty-year-old son of the famous Swedish sociologist Gunnar Myrdal . However, the real value of the book lies in the life stories of thirty villagers related to the author in a series of interviews

In the summer of 1962 Jan Myrdal, the thirty-year-old son of the famous Swedish sociologist Gunnar Myrdal, lived for a month in a Chinese village. The village Liuling is a small collection of man-made caves hollowed out of a soft slope set in the weirdly beautiful loess hills and gorges that cover much of Northwest China. However, the real value of the book lies in the life stories of thirty villagers related to the author in a series of interviews. Many of Myrdal’s subjects are active supporters of the new regime, but some are apolitical, and there is even one y.

In 1982 Myrdal went back to the Chinese village he reported on in 1962 and recorded his observations in Return to a. .He got his breakthrough in 1963 with the book Report from a Chinese Village, an anthropologic study of a Chinese village in Mao's China

In 1982 Myrdal went back to the Chinese village he reported on in 1962 and recorded his observations in Return to a Chinese Village (1984), in which he expressed his disappointment at the changes that had occurred, and his continued support of Mao's programs, including the Cultural Revolution. He got his breakthrough in 1963 with the book Report from a Chinese Village, an anthropologic study of a Chinese village in Mao's China. Subsequently, he has written many similar "reports" and travel notes from Asian countries, including India, Afghanistan and the then-Soviet Central Asian republics, in collaboration with his life partner, Gun Kessle.

In this book-yet another of the beautiful Pantheon Village series -Dolci presents a picture of mid-20th century Sicily through a series of interviews with many Sicilians

In this book-yet another of the beautiful Pantheon Village series -Dolci presents a picture of mid-20th century Sicily through a series of interviews with many Sicilians. They speak entirely on their own. His questions and observations are omitted, with only a couple short sentences at the beginning of each interview to define the speaker.

Comments to eBook Report from a Chinese village (Pantheon village series)
Niwield
The anthropologist Jan Myrdal slept in a cave near a Chinese village and interviewed 50 peasants who were eager to tell their personal stories. In his one month stay in 1962 the author interviewed peasant revolutionaries in a village in Shensi province. There was an interpreter and the peasants, of course, put themselves in a positive light. The details of life in rural China, however, is realistic, a snaphot from those who worked the land. This book was a minor sensation because China was generally closed to westerners at that time.
Gralsa
This book is a series of translated interviews conducted by the Swede Jan Myrdal in a rural village in China near Yan'an, the capital of Mao Zedong's Communist Party, in 1962. The author spent 4 weeks living in the town and interviewing the residents. The contrast between the lives of the peasants at that time as they depict themselves, and modern Western civilization, provides most of the interest to contemporary readers. It is certainly worth knowing how hard some people can work, how little they expect to possess, how they lived in caves, and how they got through the first part of the Cultural Revolution. However, the sameness of each interviewee's story becomes redundant to the point of being predictable. From the point of view of someone seeking to understand and be aware of cultural differences, it would be enough to say 'most of the poeple here are remarkably similar and they all shared the same experiences and came to the same conclusions'.

Only two interview subjects had stories notably different from the rest. One was the one person in the village who remained without civic rights as a result of being born into a landowner's family. His background was different, and his story was consequently interesting. The other subject was a young woman from an urban area of China who was sent to the village to learn to work. By her own admission, she grew up with so many servants that she hardly knew how to bathe herself (?). The outcome of her visit to the village was a complete rebirth of herself as a comrade of the peasant worker. Her story seemed to me too much of a party line to be believable.

And that, for me, is the weakness of the book. Myrdal, in his lengthy introduction, takes pains to state his bias in favor of peasants in general, and sees strong cultural links between his Swedish peasant ancestors and the peasants of communist China. The closeness of the village to the center of Mao's Communist Party, and the fact that this particular village was the one selected by the authorities for Myrdal to visit, raises the question of whether the villagers were all that objective in relating their experiences, or, whether, they were being relied upon to cast a favorable light on the communist state.

The book was useful to me to explain one aspect of the communist revolution in China. The peasants, without exception, (excluding the landowner's son, and the city girl) came out of a feudal system of savage domination that was entirely home-grown - there were no 'foreign devils' at fault here - it was all the old Chinese system of overlord landowner and landless labor workers, coupled with a system of debt-control that made the workers virtually slaves. Anyone trapped in such a system would welcome any real relief, and, if that relief involved some new ideology, so be it. One has to wonder how deeply that ideology went for a population that was 99% illiterate.

A worthwhile glimpse at one part of mid-revolution China, but a little tiresome to read and in need of more perspective.
Gajurus
Books of this type are, in my OPINION, excellent for counteracting some of the barrage of indoctrination foisted upon those residing within the USA.

This is not the place to discuss the multitude of aspects of being acculturated and educated within a society/culture/country.

The reviewed book offers a tiny peek at life for the common folks living in rural agricultural China before, during and after the revolt against the past preceding the victory of Mao's forces.

I receive the impression that the interviewed villagers spoke freely offering their opinions without fear of retribution by the system they were currently embedded within.

This book conveys information about how the common folks lived their daily lives, interacted with their neighbors and the effects of life events in general; from the Japanese invasion to the warring factions within China and other aspects of a country undergoing immense changes.

There is repetition within the book's many sub-sections of personal interviews but the varying opinions and experiences of those who experienced their life events assists in fending off the "boredom factor."

For a peek at a crucial era within China... from roughly the 1920s to the early 1960s in a small part of rural China this book is informative and, to me, entertaining.

I bought the book used and consider the low price I paid a fine investment for a few hour's leisurely reading.
Nagis
Myrdal strives to capture the human drama of village life. And since he is writing in the wake of the Great Leap Forward, we might expect an emphasis on grassroots politics. But I suspect the realities Myrdal describes are mostly older than any modern revolution. The casual approach to parenting, the neighborly approach to law enforcement, the grinding work and poverty, the women's desires for freedom -- all probably reflect realities little changed by the government in Beijing. The decency of these people comes from themselves, not from their rulers.

--author of A Galaxy of Immortal Women: The Yin Side of Chinese Civilization
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