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Fb2 Vagabonding in Europe and North Africa ePub

by Ed Buryn

Subcategory: Different
Author: Ed Buryn
ISBN: 0394487672
ISBN13: 978-0394487670
Language: English
Publisher: Random House; Revised edition (1973)
Pages: 248
Fb2 eBook: 1983 kb
ePub eBook: 1212 kb
Digital formats: azw lrf lit txt

Vagabonding in Europe and North Africa Paperback – 1971. I remember calling Ed Buryn in San Francisco when I got back and told him how much his book helped, not just me, but also the Europeans he wrote about

Vagabonding in Europe and North Africa Paperback – 1971. by. Ed Buryn (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. I remember calling Ed Buryn in San Francisco when I got back and told him how much his book helped, not just me, but also the Europeans he wrote about. He still lives around here somewhere, Antioch I think.

I actually bought this book after already deciding to hitch across Europe and N Africa. I remember calling Ed Buryn in San Francisco when I got back and told him how much his book helped, not just me, but also the Europeans he wrote about

I actually bought this book after already deciding to hitch across Europe and N Africa. I got the idea from a guy I worked with on a temp job in . that had done the deed in earlier years.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Ed Buryn's books. Vagabonding in Europe and North Africa. Ed Buryn’s Followers (3). Ed Buryn.

It is a 1st printing. From the preface: This book tells you how to visit Europe as a way of blowing your mind and enriching your life. It says that tourism is bullshit unless you get involved

It is a 1st printing. The ISBN is 0-394-70455-X, and the LOC 74-163471. It is a softcover of 214 pages, weighing 12oz and the condition is G-/NA. The covers, front and back, are creased, slightly scraped on the rear, and lightly soiled. It says that tourism is bullshit unless you get involved. To do that, you avoid your travel agent like he was the cops, and go find out about the world by yourself, for your own self.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780394706634.

Destination, rates & speeds. 2. Buryn, Ed. Published by Random House

Destination, rates & speeds. Published by Random House. ISBN 10: 0394706633 ISBN 13: 9780394706634.

Your book, Vagabonding in Europe and North Africa, was the most . Ed, I got your Vagabonding in Europe and North Africa book in 1971 and took off on a 6 month hitchhiking vagabonding adventure of my own in January 1972.

Your book, Vagabonding in Europe and North Africa, was the most essential item in my backpack when I vagabonded Europe for 10 months in 1972-73 at the age of 21. I still have it on my bookshelf 40 years later. I have had many adventures since then, and while I gave up hitch-hiking decades ago, all of my world travels have been as independent as that first on. ell, almost anyway. As I am about to retire, that experience has lasted a life time and now as I sit cleaning out my desk I am reading the book again.

I was just going through some stuff last night and found it packed away. I've found them disappointing as a general thing.

Find nearly any book by Ed Buryn. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9780394706634 (978-0-394-70663-4) Softcover, Random House, 1973.

Vagabonding in Europe and North Africa
Comments to eBook Vagabonding in Europe and North Africa
Whiteseeker
The copy I bought this year was actually for a young friend of mine going to Europe for the first time in her early 30s. I had to send it to her because it changed my life back in 1971, when I made my first trip to Europe. At that time, I was taking advangage of Icelandic Airline's deal where, for $65.00 you could go round trip from JFK to Lexumbourg, by way if Reykjavik. I had no idea where I wanted to go in Europe, so it sounded good to me.

Now understand that Icelandic Airlines had one DC-8, that required exactly 24 hours to get from New York to Iceland to Luxumbourg, do maintenance, return, and do maintenance again. The night I left, it was about 7 hours behind schedule. Three weeks later, when I returned, it had made up about half an hour. As I was waiting in the JFK terminal, I found this book. Fortunately, I had a lot of time to read it.

It exactly describes what travel is supposed to be about. It's about following your nose to whatever you find and relishing the thrill of discovering someplace new. And it's about meeting people.

Big time. Boy did I meet people. What an incredible time I had.

Now understand, there are some restrictions: If you are considering such a trip, it is very important that you go to Europe in the Summer. Or in the Winter. Or in the Spring. Or in the Fall. If you can't make it during one of those times, you should skip it. And, by the way, it is important either to go by yourself or with someone.

But go.

He strongly advises against having too much money and against studying tourist guidebooks before you go. If you discover tourist attractions, enjoy the surprise and thrill of having found them yourself. Sure, you'll miss some. But that just sets you up to come back.

This was incredibly easy for me, since I didn't have much money, and I never saw a tourist guidebook. But I met a lovely lady on the plane to Luxembourg, and we met again when we both got to London. She was a historian and a journalist, who proceeded to give me a personal tour of the city not to be believed.

One thing I discovered--not based on what this book said explicitly, but based on its attitude--was that if you meet someone from the country you are visiting, and you make it clear that this is just about the most fascinating/beautiful/interesting place you've ever been, that person will fall all over herself trying to make you feel at home. (OK, I was a guy traveling by myself and I did meet a lot of "herselfs". That's another one of the benefits of travel.)

I confess I don't know what the experience is like for young people today. When I was there, I had not already seen all of those places on television and YouTube and Google Maps Street view. Back in those days, if you have a map of a city, it means you've actually BEEN there! I really was traveling in unknown lands. (OK, it was strange that London should feel as at home to me as it did, but that was a discovery, too.)

But I am in hopes that this book will keep modern travelers alert to the fact that the whole point of the trip is to experience the thrill of discovering a new place you never thought about before--only to discover incredible riches.
Rrinel
Fun reading, however, a bit dated.
HeonIc
Book arrived in record time and the read is relevant to any time frame including present day. I recommend this to travelers and people wanting to explore Europe and North Africa
Hbr
The book was published in the 70's and for a 40-year old book this is fantastic. It's a new old book!
Beazezius
Vagabonding in Europe and North Africa was written in the late 60s and early 70s. The writing style clearly shows that, as does much of the advice listed and the information about each country.

He writes exactly as you would expect a 1960s free spirit to write, not saying that it is a bad thing, but something to adjust to. He is a funny author and very encouraging, which is important in writing about long-term very budget travel.

Some advice is very good, however some of the advice is outdated and no longer relevant. Example: "East Germany and the Communist East."

Overall this book could be useful in showing how traveling used to happen, and to encourage today's travelers to think outside the box.

I would recommend reading Rolf Potts' Vagabonding to start with. You can find it here Vagabonding: An Uncommon Guide to the Art of Long-Term World Travel
Ytli
I actually bought this book after already deciding to hitch across Europe and N Africa. I got the idea from a guy I worked with on a temp job in S.F. that had done the deed in earlier years. I did read the book before I left, and took it with me.

So I bought the Icelandic Air round trip with no scheduled time to return, landed in Luxemburg...and on my way. I can't remember how many times the info in the book helped me, went alone, but rarely alone over there. Always someone to travel with.

Interesting that several Europeans loved to read the book while sitting by the side of the road waiting for a ride. Traveled with one serb from Yugoslavia from Germany to Belgrade, my longest time travel buddy. Best memories are the Greek Islands, lazing on the beaches, free diving and eating souvlakis.

Also hitched from Tunisia, thru Algeria to Morocco. Spent some time in Essouira on the Atlantic coast in Morocco.

If you can get this book, get it, and read it. It might be somewhat dated since much of the world has changed since I went in '74. But it will get you off your seat, and just might possibly motivate you to walk away from whatever you're doing and enjoy your life for the first time.

I remember calling Ed Buryn in San Francisco when I got back and told him how much his book helped, not just me, but also the Europeans he wrote about. He still lives around here somewhere, Antioch I think. He got old just like the rest of us....
Bedy
I have enjoyed reading the reviews on this page very much as I too found the inspiration in the pages of Ed Buryn's modest book to fly off to Europe with no return ticket when I was in my twenties in the early 80's. I traveled alone as a young woman for six months through Spain, Portugal, France and Italy, but just as this book predicted, I never feared for my safety and I was never without friends. I met so many wonderful people, both fellow travelers and welcoming locals with whom I shared stories and meals and traincars.

My trip was the first really adventurous thing I had ever done, but my life since has been full of adventure as a result. Would I have gone if I had never discovered this wonderful, confidence-building, anxiety-soothing book? I like to think so. But I would have been far less prepared for, and open to, the kindness and generosity I experienced every step of the way... I'm so glad I had the chance to see for myself the world that Ed Buryn described in his book. It's nice to be able to share this gratitude with other fellow travelers who, like me, followed Mr. Buryn's call and took to the road, if even for a short while.
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