» » Stealing Sheep: The Church's Hidden Problems of Transfer Growth

Fb2 Stealing Sheep: The Church's Hidden Problems of Transfer Growth ePub

by William Chadwick

Category: Churches and Church Leadership
Subcategory: Christian Books
Author: William Chadwick
ISBN: 0830822798
ISBN13: 978-0830822799
Language: English
Publisher: Intervarsity Pr (August 1, 2001)
Pages: 187
Fb2 eBook: 1203 kb
ePub eBook: 1989 kb
Digital formats: mobi lit lit mbr

Church growth, in other words, is largely that of transfer growth (people leaving one church to join another), with very little due to conversion growth (people being saved and brought into a local fellowship)

Church growth, in other words, is largely that of transfer growth (people leaving one church to join another), with very little due to conversion growth (people being saved and brought into a local fellowship). This book examines the issue of transfer growth, and the larger phenomenon of the church growth movement. The author argues that transfer growth is wrong and it should be discontinued

Chadwick’s book is a marvelous challenge to the widespread problem of. .Chadwick’s argument against the church growth movement is not aimed at its roots

Chadwick’s book is a marvelous challenge to the widespread problem of Christian mobility. Part One examines the issue of transfer growth as a phenomenon and accepted practice in the church. This part contains a fantastic chapter 2 on the meaning of the church and the importance and significance of church membership. Chadwick’s argument against the church growth movement is not aimed at its roots. In fact, the author himself was a devotee of the movement in the early years, and it’s clear that he still believes the roots of the movement were fairly sound. Make no mistake about it, he writes on page 128.

William Chadwick explores the hidden problems when people join one church .Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Stealing Sheep: The Hidden Problems of Transfer Growth as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

William Chadwick is no opponent of the church growth movement. The real blame for allowing this quantity of transfer growth has to be assigned to the pastors who allow it to happen and who sometimes actively seek it.

The Church's Hidden Problems of Transfer Growth. Published August 2001 by InterVarsity Press. There's no description for this book yet. The first time I ever stole anything, I was caught.

Published: 1 October 2002. by SAGE Publications.

When people join one church after leaving another, experts call it transfer growth. People in the pew call it church hopping. William Chadwick calls it one of the most dangerous trends to face the body of Christ in decades. He calls it sheep stealing. All around us churches are seeking better and more creative ways to attract people - more dynamic preaching, better worship, more of the Spirit, better drama. While the intent is often to bring in those who are not Christians, this increasingly common strategy has, Chadwick contends, largely resulted in Christians merely shifting congregations

William Chadwick, Stealing Sheep: The Church's Hidden Problems of Transfer Growth. Matthew J. Mardis, Niche Congregations and the Problem of Institutional Isomorphism: A Study of the Church as Institution

William Chadwick, Stealing Sheep: The Church's Hidden Problems of Transfer Growth. Mardis, Niche Congregations and the Problem of Institutional Isomorphism: A Study of the Church as Institution. It involves a lengthy along with tools to analyze the data

William Chadwick explores the hidden problems when people join one church after leaving another, a phenomenon he refers to as stealing sheep.

William Chadwick explores the hidden problems when people join one church after leaving another, a phenomenon he refers to as stealing sheep. No current Talk conversations about this book.

Book by Chadwick, William
Comments to eBook Stealing Sheep: The Church's Hidden Problems of Transfer Growth
Goltizuru
I can't emphasize enough how important this book is. Here is an honest Christian pastor who was and is ready to examine all he has been led to believe in as God's truth in light of Scritpure.
Once led to believe that all growth is God-pleasing growth, Pastor William Chadwick writes of how he discovered to his shock and surprise that Church Growth to date has failed in its goal: kingdom growth.
It has succeeded in what Chadwick calls the sinful growth "Transfer Growth," or stealing sheep, rearranging the flock, etc. He details his discovery of large churches growing at the expense of other churches, shamelessly, unlovingly. Guilty here is the movements principles being drawn not from the mind of Christ, but from the mind of the business world and other enemies of Christ.
What is truly remarkable about this is the fact the Chadwick still identifies himself as church growth believer. He sees a future and place for it still. Although I disagree with the author on this, the church is indebted to this work and his honesty, and what one could only pray and trust that his mind will continue to be open to the Lord's leading.
This is must read for all interested in growing Christ's Church!
Ganthisc
Not very helpful for traditional liturgical congregations.
Macage
This book has a sobering and timely message: most churches have stopped growing. Sure, many are getting bigger, but that is only because others are getting smaller. Church growth, in other words, is largely that of transfer growth (people leaving one church to join another), with very little due to conversion growth (people being saved and brought into a local fellowship).
This book examines the issue of transfer growth, and the larger phenomenon of the church growth movement. The author argues that transfer growth is wrong and it should be discontinued. In a nutshell, transfer growth gives a false view of the state of the church; it devalues evangelism; it promotes individualism instead of body life; and it detracts from the kingdom of God, exalting instead individual ministries.
The sad fact is, transfer growth adds nothing to the Kingdom of God: it simply reshuffles the deck. The church growth leaders of the 1980s closely examined the data and came to just that conclusion: there was no appreciable growth in the American evangelical population during this period. And the author quotes Australian research to show similar findings here as well
Indeed, the whole issue of church growth needs to be questioned. Too many pastors have fell to the intoxicating spell of numbers - numerical growth is seen as evidence of God's blessing. But, if this growth is simple the recycling of existing Christians, one has to question its validity. The command to reach the lost has degenerated into the desire simply to be bigger. But bigger is not necessarily better, and raiding other churches to become bigger is an unethical means of growth.
Of course this emphasis on numbers and the marketing techniques to obtain such numbers is a product of the secular culture around us. Says Chadwick, "The McChurch has replaced the traditional home church and its relational values. Fast-food Christians pull up to ecclesiastical drive-through windows, order their McGroups, consume the experience and then drive off, discarding relationships like burger wrappers on the highway of life. Savvy church growth pastors quickly learned that significant growth can occur if a church learns how to market its burgers to capture the appetite of this roving crowd."
The truth is, church growth by conversion is a long and difficult task, while sheep stealing is quick and easy. In an age that values instant results, this is a plus. But for a church that has been told to make disciples, not steal sheep, this is a minus. Pastors must resist the temptation to take the easy path.
Also problematic is the fact that people often leave churches for the wrong reasons: to avoid conflict and its resolution; because of personality conflicts; impatience with worship styles; etc. Christians have become shoppers - religious consumers who instead of seeking to plug into a body of believers and stick with it, making it a better place, simply flit from one church to another, much like we flip through television channels with the remote control. Thus both leaders and lay people contribute to the sheep stealing problem.
There are cases, however, when a believer may need to leave a dying church. For example, churches that no longer preach the gospel message, or that teach heresy, or that are abusive, are all cases where a believe probably should leave. But such a move is about sheep rescue, not sheep stealing. It is a healthy type of transfer growth. But such a move should be considered prayerfully. Perhaps in some cases the desire to leave should be reconsidered. Perhaps staying and fighting might result in the renewal of the dying church.
And there is a time and place for a pastor to let go of some sheep as well. Sometimes a change is needed for the person's individual growth. But again, such moves should be prayerfully considered. Escapism is the easy way out too often.
Thus this book does not call for a total ban on transfer growth. But it does dismantle many of the myths about church growth, shows the dangers involved, and points to a better way. In an age of mega-churches, and Christian marketing techniques, we need to be discerning and cautious. Simply adopting the world's methods may seem to bring good results, but such results may in fact be built on sinking sand. Only churches built on the rock will stand. This incisive book helps us to do just that.
Yainai
Chadwick has written a courageous and shocking book detailing the truth--most famous "growing" churches in America are merely engaging in a popularity contest with other area churches. They are having negligible impact on the non Christian communities around them. My team has confirmed all that Chadwick claims and much more besides! During the past 12 years we have done on the ground research proving that famous megachurches in America are made up almost entirely of transfer.

In fact, Chadwick's estimates are way too generous, according to our research. We have found that with only three exceptions, the well-known big churches we have studied have had less than 10% of their people state that they met Christ at that church. Many have less than 5%.

The intriguing point Chadwick makes is that the church doesn't want to discuss these facts, and doesn't want to face them. They would rather sweep these facts under the carpet and continue competing for believers from other churches.

I am forced to agree. Why do churches that measure every aspect of their growth consistently have no information on the composition of their membership in terms of transfers/converts? It's hard to imagine a good reason why churches would fail to gather this crucial statistic.
-Dennis McCallum, author Organic Disciplemaking: How to promote Christian leadership development through personal relationships, biblical discipleship, mentoring, and Christian community
Related to Stealing Sheep: The Church's Hidden Problems of Transfer Growth
A history of the art of war in the sixteenth century eBook
Fb2 A history of the art of war in the sixteenth century ePub
Computing for executives eBook
Fb2 Computing for executives ePub
A manual for church growth surveys eBook
Fb2 A manual for church growth surveys ePub
The sheep-shearing, 1771 eBook
Fb2 The sheep-shearing, 1771 ePub
The Spirit of the Oxford Movement: Tractarian Essays eBook
Fb2 The Spirit of the Oxford Movement: Tractarian Essays ePub
Business Aspects of Technology Transfer eBook
Fb2 Business Aspects of Technology Transfer ePub
Church Growth: State of the Art eBook
Fb2 Church Growth: State of the Art ePub
Advances in Heat Transfer, Volume 30: Transport Phenomena in Crystal Growth eBook
Fb2 Advances in Heat Transfer, Volume 30: Transport Phenomena in Crystal Growth ePub
Convective Heat Transfer eBook
Fb2 Convective Heat Transfer ePub