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Fb2 The Search for God at Harvard ePub

by Ari L. Goldman

Category: Christian Living
Subcategory: Christian Books
Author: Ari L. Goldman
ISBN: 0345377060
ISBN13: 978-0345377067
Language: English
Publisher: Ballantine Books (April 21, 1992)
Pages: 283
Fb2 eBook: 1903 kb
ePub eBook: 1180 kb
Digital formats: lrf rtf docx azw

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In 1985 Ari L. Goldman took a year’s leave from his . .Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound. Paperback, 283 pages.

When he arrives at Harvard, in the mid-1980s, he is surprised to find an eclectic mix of students, from all the major religions, debating about major issues of the day. His view of Harvard's Divinity school as uppity, straight-laced ministers is challenged with every new student he meets

In 1985 Ari L. Goldman took a year’s leave from his job as a religion reporter for The New York Times and enrolled in the . Goldman took a year’s leave from his job as a religion reporter for The New York Times and enrolled in the Harvard Divinity School. What began as a project to deepen his knowledge of the world’s sacred beliefs turned out to be an extraordinary journey of spiritual illumination, one in which Goldman reexamined his own faith as an Orthodox Jew and opened his mind to the great religions of the world.

The report on Harvard fizzles in contrast. Goldman sounds like a wide-eyed freshman, awestruck at the & joy'' of living in fabled Cambridge. What's worse, the Divinity School seems to be a mess, its faculty decimated by retirements and defections, its students obsessed with & relativism rather than religious truth.

The suspicion grows that Ari Goldman’s own lifelong focus on religious feelings at the expense of normative structures played a major role in his difficulty (which is hardly his alone) in finding God at Harvard. Jon D. Levenson is the Albert A. List Professor of Jewish Studies at Harvard University and the author, most recently, of The Love of God: Divine Gift, Human Gratitude, and Mutual Faithfulness in Judaism (Princeton University Press).

Ari Goldman is a former religious affairs reporter for the New York Times, his position during the period of time he attended, on sabbatical from the newspaper, Harvard Divinity School.

A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK OF THE YEARIn 1985 Ari L. Goldman took a year’s leave from his job as a religion reporter for The New York Times and enrolled in the Harvard Divinity School. What began as a project to deepen his knowledge of the world’s sacred beliefs turned out to be an extraordinary journey of spiritual illumination, one in which Goldman reexamined his own faith as an Orthodox Jew and opened his mind to the great religions of the world.In his year at Harvard, Goldman found to his surprise that his fellow students were not straitlaced, somber clerics, but a diverse, vibrant, and sometimes embattled group from every major religion, united by their deep spiritual commitment. Even more surprising was the spiritual climate of the Divinity School itself: Far from being an ivory tower or a bastion of old-time Christian piety, the school was a forum for passionate debate on the relationships between religion and politics, social mores and sexuality.Written with warmth, humor, and penetrating clarity, The Search for God at Harvard is a book for anyone who has wrestled with the question of what it means to take religion seriously today.Praise for The Search for God at Harvard:“Personal yet informative, warm and humorous, beautifully written. In a word, superb.”–Elie Wiesel“Is it possible to honor the truth of one’s own religion while being genuinely open to others? In The Search for God at Harvard, Ari Goldman tells his story in so fine a manner that he helps us to understand why the answer must be yes.”–The New York Times Book Review“Excellent: intelligent, informative, infused with humor.”–Cleveland Plain Dealer“Enriching . . . well-written, absorbing.”–The Boston Globe“A valuable and unique contribution.”–The Washington Post Book World
Comments to eBook The Search for God at Harvard
Shakar
Very interesting and thoughtfully written memoir of the author's life and unexpected opportunities to learn. It is the story of his own and his fellow classmate's search for God in an academic setting. A refreshingly down-to-earth spiritual journey.
Very Old Chap
I had hoped it was an intellectual search apliable to all faiths. The emphasis is the Jewish faith.
Wilalmaine
It's not that I didn't enjoy this to some degree, but the more I got into the less I enjoyed it. It is not as advertised. Goldman skims the surface of other religions and I really got the impression that he doesn't think too much of them. What this is is a story of how an Orthodox Jew came to terms with having a job that sometimes forced him to work on the Sabbath. If anything, his stint at the Harvard Div School in 1985 reinforced his own religion, and that is about it. Good for him, but it does not make for an elightened experience at all. With true ecumencial joining he would have given a little of himself to each religion that he covered, not simply "reported" on them, along with his feelings about individuals representative of each.
Rivik
I ordered a copy of "The Search for God at Harvard" after reading a copy I borrowed from a friend. When I received my copy I was delighted to find out that while only $1.00 + postage it was an edition that was embellished with images that added the depth of comprehension by showing Mr. Goldman and his family. All in all I could not be happier. I recommend this book and this distributor as a source.
Tojahn
This book mixes autobiography and a discussion of Goldman's classes and classmates at Harvard Divinity School. The autobiography part was well done: I definitely got a real sense of the author's background. (And I have to admit that I identify with Goldman's religious leanings, which made it easier).

However, I sensed that his discussion of Harvard and of other religions got crowded out by his autobiography; I came away hungry for a little more of the former than Goldman actually wrote.

Nevertheless, even his relatively shallow religious discussion contained a few provocative points here and there. I liked his comparison of Judaism (or by implication any religion) to a tree: just as a tree provides value even though it emerged from a tiny acorn, a religion is of value even if its origins are not what its adherents traditionally claim.

And I liked his examples of how, perhaps because Christianity is so familiar to most Harvard Divinity students, Harvard devalues traditional Christianity while being as generous as possible to other religions. (On the other hand I wonder if Goldman doesn't do the same. Because he was exposed to right-wing Orthodoxy in high school, when he sees it again as a suburban congregant he doesn't treat it quite as charitably as he treats other religions. He seems to dismiss every ideological quirk of his congregation as an example of pointless zealotry, rather than considering the possibility that their views may reflect either (a) a return to rules of Jewish law that his parents' generation ignored or (b) legitimate disagreements over "close calls" in Jewish law).
Stick
Years ago, as a newly ordained Catholic priest, I dropped a note of appreciation to a religion writer at the New York Times, telling him, "Well, as your name is Ari Goldman I would bet that you weren't in the Junior Holy Name Society of the local parish, but I want to tell you that your writing on Religion is refreshing. Whatever tradition you're covering, you really get into it and write insightfully as though from within, and how you do it I do not know. It's rare." And he phoned me and we chatted, and he told me of a forthcoming book which would answer my questions about his writing.

This was it. A real keeper. Wherever I've moved since it came with me. I have bought copies for parishioners, for friends and other seekers, and always they have found it helpful. It's about life; Ari's life, and about the search for meaning, and about faith and a full, rich life, and in that it's about all our lives. I would think anyone alive to the need for meaning in life would find this a great read. It's the search for meaning in the best sense -- not narrowing, but deepening and broadening. A life-celebrating book.
monotronik
Ari Goldman, a New York Times Religion reporter, proposes a sabbatical leave to his editors. He wants to study at Harvard Divinity School for one year to improve his perspective on world religions, and add depth and knowledge to his articles concerning religion for the newspaper. When he arrives at Harvard, in the mid-1980s, he is surprised to find an eclectic mix of students, from all the major religions, debating about major issues of the day. His view of Harvard's Divinity school as uppity, straight-laced ministers is challenged with every new student he meets.
Goldman discusses his own religious life and spiritual memoirs. A yeshiva-educated Orthodox Jew, Goldman struggled in college with his career interests and his religious training. How could one keep kosher in a foreign country? How could one keep Sabbath when a huge news story breaks?
There are chapters in the book describing the major religions and the courses that Goldman took at the Divinity School to help him understand each. There are also chapters discussing Women in Religion, Orthodoxy, and other issues that modern religions encounter.
Goldman's writing style is very readable (no doubt because of his journalism background) and he writes with spirit. He does not hesitate to discuss trials and struggles that the people at the Divinity School have, or things that he struggles with himself.
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