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Fb2 Pooh and the Philosophers (Winnie-the-Pooh) (Wisdom of Pooh) ePub

by John Tyerman Williams

Subcategory: Children
Author: John Tyerman Williams
ISBN: 0749320702
ISBN13: 978-0749320706
Language: English
Publisher: Egmont Childrens Books (April 28, 1997)
Pages: 224
Fb2 eBook: 1677 kb
ePub eBook: 1431 kb
Digital formats: lit azw docx txt

7 Summary and Conclusion. Winnie the Pooh In the Classroom. Elisabeth M. Knudsen. In this discussion I will use John Tyerman Williams’ book Pooh and the Philosophers to show the philosophical cleverness of Pooh.

7 Summary and Conclusion. With this I will show that it is evident that not only children can learn something from Winnie the Pooh, but students of all ages. Nevertheless, this chapter is not a way of getting pupils to read the stories, but rather to show another way of using Pooh in a learning situation.

99; June 1996; 214 p. 0-525-45520-5): Contending that Pooh, all his protestations to the contrary notwithstanding, is in fact a Bear of Great Brain Indeed, Williams drives an already frayed conceit deeply, deeply into the ground, proposing Pythagorean precepts that presage Poohvian pronouncements, spinning more parallels from Spinoza, digging up Heideggerian dogma, giving.

Having read The Tao of Pooh and Te of Piglet (Wisdom of Pooh), I came across this book by accident in a bookshop and bought it on impulse. The premise of the book is that the stories of Winnie the Pooh and the House at Pooh Corner contain the whole of western philosophy. The book examines how key ideas from the thinking of Plato through to the existentialists are described through these two stories. Indeed given that these stories were published in 1926 and 1928 a number of more recent philosophers are shown to have provided either footnotes to the Pooh stories or have expounded on them.

Pooh and the Philosophers book . Shelves: british, non-fiction, 20th-century. Pooh and the Philosophers: -Every-Minute. I admit I was curious.

Winnie-the-Pooh took his head out of the hole, and thought for a little, and he thought to himself . So for a week Christopher Robin read that sort of book at the North end of Pooh, and Rabbit hung his washing on the South en. nd in between Bear felt himself getting slenderer and slenderer.

Winnie-the-Pooh took his head out of the hole, and thought for a little, and he thought to himself, ‘There must be somebody there, because somebody must have said Nobody. And at the end of the week Christopher Robin said, ‘Now!’

Pooh is the favourite, of course, there's no denying it, but Piglet comes in for a good many things which Pooh misses; because you . in which we are introduced to Winnie-the-Pooh and some bees, and the stories begin.

Pooh is the favourite, of course, there's no denying it, but Piglet comes in for a good many things which Pooh misses; because you can't take Pooh to school without everybody knowing it, but Piglet is so small that he slips into a pocket, where it is very comforting to feel him when you are not quite sure whether twice seven. is twelve or twenty-two in which we are introduced to Winnie-the-Pooh and some bees, and the stories begin. HERE is Edward Bear, coming downstairs now, bump, bump, bump, on the back of his head, behind Christopher Robin.

From classics like Winnie the Pooh to Pixar’s The Incredibles, Disney films are packed with some of the most heartwarming, funny, and romantic quotes around. Sit back, relax, and enjoy perusing the magic that is Disney. Winne The Pooh Quotes Winnie The Pooh Friends Piglet Quotes Tigger Winnie The Pooh Winnie The Pooh Classic Vintage Winnie The Pooh Christopher Robin Quotes Smiley Quotes Snoopy Quotes. Dreaming In Black And White.

The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh. Winnie the Pooh and Tigger Too. Pooh's Heffalump Movie. Pooh's Heffalump Halloween Movie.

Pooh and the Philosphers tells us what we all should have known by ourselves - the the Bear of Little Brain is nothing less than a great philosopher and a very smart bear indeed

Pooh and the Philosphers tells us what we all should have known by ourselves - the the Bear of Little Brain is nothing less than a great philosopher and a very smart bear indeed. People give me strange looks when I laugh oput loud while reading this hilarious and yet serious book on the bus but who cares?

This work sets out to prove that the whole of of Western philosophy, from the cosmologists to the existentialists, may be found in the pages of "Winnie-the-Pooh" and "The House at Pooh Corner". It shows how the "Great Bear" explains the most profound ideas of great thinkers such as Plato and Kant.
Comments to eBook Pooh and the Philosophers (Winnie-the-Pooh) (Wisdom of Pooh)
Ferne
I have read, re read, and re re read this book. It's really not that big of a book, but I enjoyed every bit of it. It kind of explains how Pooh is actually smarter than the rest of the characters. Warning: This big is very deep in thought.
Walianirv
Love this book!
ᴜɴɪᴄᴏʀɴ
All around great experience!
Forcestalker
Having read The Tao of Pooh and Te of Piglet (Wisdom of Pooh), I came across this book by accident in a bookshop and bought it on impulse. The premise of the book is that the stories of Winnie the Pooh and the House at Pooh Corner contain the whole of western philosophy.

The book examines how key ideas from the thinking of Plato through to the existentialists are described through these two stories. Indeed given that these stories were published in 1926 and 1928 a number of more recent philosophers are shown to have provided either footnotes to the Pooh stories or have expounded on them.

The first thing to say is that this is an enjoyable, fun and eminently readable book. I initially approached it with some scepticism and for the first part of the book harboured the fear that I may be the subject of a joke on the basis that given enough analysis the London tube timetable can probably be shown to have the key thoughts of Karl Marx or be shown to predict the date of the apocalypse. As I read through the book however I became more and more drawn into the underpinning ideas of what I had previously seen as children's stories and to my surprise found that through them I was adding considerably to my understanding of the philosophers thinking.

As I began to accept the argument of a philosophical basis to the stories my intrigue switched to the nature of communicating ideas. A.A. Milne it appears had taken the extremely dry and largely inaccessible topic of philosophy and packaged it up in the most accessible of children's stories. If this is what he has done, then maybe he was just too clever since most readers of Winnie the Pooh have no idea that they are reading about philosophy. Of course this is probably a virtue since many readers would run a mile if they thought they were invited to read a philosophy book. For other readers who want to have the philosophy pointed out to them perhaps Milne set out to sow a seed which has taken 75 years to germinate and now be revealed in this book.

The book establishes a convincing case that the thinking of western philosophy is contained in these apparently simple stories. Interesting though this is, more importantly it has revealed a great deal of insight about the nature of communicating ideas.

This book provides an insightful glimpse into the use of stories to communicate complex ideas. More importantly just as the Winnie the Pooh stories do, it does so in a way that you learn almost by accident without feeling you had to try.

If you want to learn about thinking without having to feel that you have to think, or would like to understand philosophy without the need to read a philosophy book then this is the book for you.
Chilele
All in all this book was an average book - it is a brief introduction to the classical world of Winnie-the-Pooh (not that Disney recreation) and western philosophy. What it does not do is go into any great detail on either area. It's tone is also extremely sarcastic and at time hostile towards the philosophers (the section on Sartre should be viewed as a direct attack, not an unbiased analysis). The book does one thing, however, which redeems it for all of its many short comings - it shows the reader that the stories of Winnie-the-Pooh are inherently philosophical. While this may seem obvious to some readers, many people cannot see the philosophic overtones in popular culture. It is not their fault, it is simply a skill which takes training.

Reading this book can help people open their eyes to philosophies presence in the great works of fiction which define our culture. It is something that proves philosophy to be useful and important. The book also points the reader to a number of philosophers and books written by them and their school which can lead them to learning more. It can be a gateway for the love of wisdom, with a love of "The Great Bear" and the guide to that first discovery. And that is what makes this book worth reading.
Jan
Benjamin Hoff wrote "The Tao of Pooh," which was a wonderul introduction Taoism by way of Winnie the Pooh. Williams in this book tries to do much the same for a survey of Western philosophy: Plato and other Greeks, Descartes and other 17th-c. Rationalists, Locke and other British Empiricists, Kant and other Germans, and the post-Pooh Existentialists. He doesn't really succeed as well as Hoff did, partly because he tries to cover too many different schools of philosophy, and partly because he just doesn't have the same spark. Also, his coverage of the Pooh canon is very uneven: the Introduction, Eeyore's Birthday, and What Tiggers Have for Breakfast are mined over and over again; while the Search for Small, for Eeyore's Tail, and Why Tiggers Don't Climb Trees get barely a mention even though they have promising content. I should have liked to see Eeyore's House compared with Theseus' Boat, for that matter.

Not much good as an introduction to philosophy, more a review for people who once studied this stuff in school and might enjoy a light-hearted reminder. (And even then, will raise more of a chuckle than an outright laugh.) Useless as a study of Pooh, of course. Little to no replay value.
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