» » Conjure Times: Black Magicians in America

Fb2 Conjure Times: Black Magicians in America ePub

by Kathleen Benson,James Haskins

Category: Activities Crafts and Games
Subcategory: Children
Author: Kathleen Benson,James Haskins
ISBN: 0802787630
ISBN13: 978-0802787637
Language: English
Publisher: Walker & Co (June 1, 2001)
Fb2 eBook: 1997 kb
ePub eBook: 1187 kb
Digital formats: azw mbr doc lrf

In Conjure Times: Black Magicians in America, Jim Haskins and Kathleen Benson introduce us to numerous noteworthy illusionists, nearly none of whomI'd heard of before, and all of whom weought to have had. Among them: Richard Potter, the first American born magician (of any color), according to the authors. He opened his act with a little jingle: "They call me a mulatto/ And my name is Little Potter/ And for cutting up the capers/ I'm the There is much to be said for getting a good idea first.

Select Format: Hardcover. ISBN13:9780802787620.

Find signed collectible books: 'Conjure Times: Black Magicians in America'. by James Haskins, Kathleen Benson, Anne Devereaux Jordan, Virginia Schomp, Shroud, S. Pearl Sharp. by James Haskins, Kathleen Benson. ISBN 9780822560456 (978-0-8225-6045-6) Softcover, Lernerclassroom, 2007. ISBN 9780761421740 (978-0-7614-2174-0) Benchmark Books, 2006.

com's James Haskins Author Page. by Jim Haskins, Kathleen Benson, Benny Andrews. Conjure Times: Black Magicians in America Jan 1, 2009.

Powerfully written text by James Haskins and Kathleen Benson and . One of the places I found privacy was in books. I could be anywhere at all, but if I was reading it book I was by in myself.

Powerfully written text by James Haskins and Kathleen Benson and evocative illustrations by award-winning artist James Ransome bring to life the time when America became dependent on slave labor and slaves struggled to maintain the traditions of their rich African culture and resist oppression in the new world. James Haskins is the author of more than a hundred books for both adults and children, including The Cotton Club, which inspired the motion picture of the same name, and The Story of Stevie Wonder, which won the Coretta Scott King Award.

Richard Potter (magician). LibraryThing members' description.

His books Black Music in America, The March on Washington . 2000) – Winner of The Carter G. Woodson Award Honor Book, 2001 Following Freedom’s Star: The Story of the Underground Railroad, with Kathleen.

His books Black Music in America, The March on Washington, and Carter G. Woodson: The Man Who Put Black in American History were selected for the Carter G. Woodson Award for young adult non-fiction in 1989, 1994, and 2001, respectively. Donations to the James Haskins Visiting Scholar Fellowship can be mailed to the UF Foundation, PO Box 14425, Gainesville, FL 32604

James Haskins (September 19, 1941 – July 6, 2005) was a prolific and award-winning author with more than one hundred books for both adults and children.

James Haskins (September 19, 1941 – July 6, 2005) was a prolific and award-winning author with more than one hundred books for both adults and children. Many of his books highlight the achievements of African Americans and cover the history and culture of Africa and the African-American experience. His work also included many biographical subjects, ranging from Hank Aaron to Scatman Crothers and Malcolm X. Most of his writings were for young people.

African Americans - Biography. Benson, Kathleen author. Haskins, James, 1941-2005. African American magicians Biography Juvenile literature. African Americans Biography.

Probes historical documents and uncovers a unique aspect of the African-American cultural experience where, because of slavery and racial discrimination, few magicians of color became famous even though they achieved great skill and a flare for entertaining audiences.
Comments to eBook Conjure Times: Black Magicians in America
Thozius
I ordered this book because Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. referenced it for an internet article he wrote about Richard Potter, the first American-born magician and ventriloquist. There were a couple of inaccuracies in Gates' essay so I was curious about his source material. Shame on both Dr. Gates and the authors for not doing their homework. In addition, Jim Magus' book, listed in the bibliography of this book, is equally as inaccurate. It is Magus' creative take on Potter's life and is filled with as many suppositions as facts and should not be used as source material. Having spent over 30 years researching Richard Potter and writing an article on him for American Legacy magazine I feel qualified to make this assessment.

The attribution of Sir Charles Henry Frankland being father to any of Dinah's children cannot be true. Sir Harry died before they were born. His wife, Agnes, stayed on the estate until it was no longer prudent to do so as a Loyalist. It is likely that Sir Harry's relative, Henry Cromwell (Frankland) was in a position to father children as he was raised by the Franklands, as an adult visited the estate often and was an heir. But it is untrue that all of Dinah's children were "mulatto." Church records indicate otherwise. There are many other inaccuracies in this book but In my opinion their worst oversight is their failure to mention how Potter used ventriloquism to combat social injustice nonviolently. What a shame where a "children's" book could positively impress young minds.

From their lack of scholarship on the Potter chapter I can only infer that the other biographies are equally inadequate. When people use resource material without substantiating them or even seeing if the alleged facts line up this is what you get.
Jugami
another book about places and times that many of us would never know about if not for this author telling the story.
Urllet
Loved it a must read for any age.
Xor
Well written book by a master of history. This book has inspired me to read others by Haskins. A definite must read.
Samulkree
Slogging through this slim volume, I tried to imagine the readership being aimed at. The senior author, Haskins, is mainly known for children's books, but there is no indication anywhere on dust jacket or inside that this particular book was written with a young audience in mind. Yet the narrative style is exceedingly, wearingly simplistic, nearly at the level of Dick and Jane.

I found two crippling problems with the book. (1), The authors seem to have done little or no independent research, relying mainly on two earlier works by Jim Magus and Milbourne Christopher. (2), The authors seem to know almost nothing about their supposed topic, performing stage magic. Much of what they say about the magical feats presented by the magicians they discuss is comically nonsensical.

Anyway, the topic of the book is "black magicians in America," beginning with Richard Potter, the first native-born American magician of any race, and ending with David Blaine. You'll get very slender accounts of the careers of Potter, Henry "Box" Brown, "Boomsky," Alonzo Moore, William Carl, the Armstrongs, Jovedah de Rajah, Marcelliee, Chandu Hunter, Black Herman, the great Fetaque Sanders, Frank Brents, Odis Price, and contemporary performers such as Goldfinger and Dove, Lemont Haskins, Charles Green III, and of course David Blaine.

Alas, the narratives of the careers of these gentlemen are so under-researched and sketchily written as to be continually frustrating. Magicians will appreciate how profoundly ignorant the level of discussion generally is by a single, typical quote, from p. 128: "A classic magic illusion is the 'Broomstick Suspension,' which is just what the title suggests. A magician causes a broomstick to be suspended in mid-air." The reference is of course actually to the Broom Suspension, which goes back at least to mid-19th Century French conjurer Robert-Houdin, and involves using a broom standing on end on stage, inserted under the armpit of an assistant, to apparently suspend the assistant in midair. Presenting the manuscript to almost any magician in America, to be read and corrected before publication, would have eliminated essentially every one of these blunders... such as the breathless assertion that "The Pass" is a card trick!

Pioneering black magicians performed under conditions that would have discouraged almost anyone, and often had tragically short careers, dying in their 40s or 50s, after laboring in almost total obscurity. Maybe someday they'll be the subject of a well-researched, well-informed book. We'll have to wait...
Related to Conjure Times: Black Magicians in America
Math-a-magic: Number tricks for magicians eBook
Fb2 Math-a-magic: Number tricks for magicians ePub
Night of the New Magicians (Magic Tree House #35) eBook
Fb2 Night of the New Magicians (Magic Tree House #35) ePub
Magicians' Tricks eBook
Fb2 Magicians' Tricks ePub
The Kahunas : The Black and White Magicians of Hawaii eBook
Fb2 The Kahunas : The Black and White Magicians of Hawaii ePub
Critical Perspectives on Historical and Contemporary Issues About Africa and Black America (Black Studies) eBook
Fb2 Critical Perspectives on Historical and Contemporary Issues About Africa and Black America (Black Studies) ePub
Lift Every Voice: The History of African American Music (The African American Experience Series) eBook
Fb2 Lift Every Voice: The History of African American Music (The African American Experience Series) ePub
The Conjure Woman eBook
Fb2 The Conjure Woman ePub
Morning of Magicians eBook
Fb2 Morning of Magicians ePub
Equal Protection and the African American Constitutional Experience: A Documentary History (Primary Documents in American History and Contemporary Issues) eBook
Fb2 Equal Protection and the African American Constitutional Experience: A Documentary History (Primary Documents in American History and Contemporary Issues) ePub