» » Harvard Business Review on Leading in Turbulent Times (Harvard Business Review Paperback Series)

Fb2 Harvard Business Review on Leading in Turbulent Times (Harvard Business Review Paperback Series) ePub

by Harvard Business School,Adrian Slywotzky,Joseph L. Badaracco Jr.

Category: Management and Leadership
Subcategory: Business and Work
Author: Harvard Business School,Adrian Slywotzky,Joseph L. Badaracco Jr.
ISBN: 1591391806
ISBN13: 978-1591391807
Language: English
Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press; 1 edition (March 20, 2002)
Pages: 208
Fb2 eBook: 1612 kb
ePub eBook: 1353 kb
Digital formats: rtf docx lit azw

HBR took its finest articles from its best authors and compiled a series of paperbacks on topical subjects.

These papers discuss fixing the business fallouts prior to 2002. The economic picture you read in this book is nothing like what we experience now.

This book is a collection of papers from academics and business professionals on various business strategies during an economic chaos. This book was published in 2003 which consists of eight chapters originally printed from 1998-2002. These papers A bunch of outdated articles some of which looks odd from the current perspectiv. These papers discuss fixing the business fallouts prior to 2002.

Since 1984, Harvard Business School Press has been dedicated to. .It's a short book so spending your valuable time on this one is well worth it and I certainly appreciated the work from the writers.

Since 1984, Harvard Business School Press has been dedicated to publishing the most contemporary management thinking, written by authors and practitioners who are leading the way. Whether readers are seeking big-picture strategic thinking or tactical problem solving, advice in managing global corporations or for developing personal careers, HBS Press helps fuel the fire of innovative thought.

Books help readers understand the fundamental issues, concerns, and controversies associated with each of the respective topics. Readers can use the books to brush up on the latest, best thinking or to address a particular need in their organizations.

The business environment has become increasingly precarious, thus raising the stakes for nearly .

The business environment has become increasingly precarious, thus raising the stakes for nearly every managerial move. This cutting edge collection includes articles on how to lead in a downturn economy, overcome a growth crisis, stay resilient through difficult periods, and more more ng today's managers and professionals the fundamental information they need to stay competitive in a fast-moving world.

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This collection features breakthroughs in strategy from some of the pre-eminent names in this field.

HBR is published six times a year and is headquartered in Brighton, Massachusetts

HBR is published six times a year and is headquartered in Brighton, Massachusetts. HBR's articles cover a wide range of topics that are relevant to various industries, management functions, and geographic locations.

The business environment has become increasingly precarious, thus raising the stakes for nearly every managerial move. This collection includes articles on how to lead in a downturn economy, overcome a growth crisis, stay resilient through difficult periods, and more.
Comments to eBook Harvard Business Review on Leading in Turbulent Times (Harvard Business Review Paperback Series)
Ka
One of the cardinal rules of knowledge I learned as a graduate student is that it is always prudent to seek the wisdom of others on what to do not just during times of calm but during periods of turmoil as well (or, in our case, a recession)... even if the essays are somewhat dated.

The first thing I noticed about this journal edition when I opened it was that the copyright date was 2003 and some of the essays contained where written prior to 9/11. At first I was going to dismiss the book as dated given the differences in economics in a post-9/11 world but then I thought, what kind of <amateur> scholar would this make me if I rejected it flat outright?

I then spent an entire day reading up on the eight enclosed articles and, for the most part, I was impressed with the knowledge of the Harvard Business School. It is difficult to write a review on a journal anthology as you have to judge the articles one at a time (which is time consuming) so I will give my brief two-bits on what I liked and disagreed with.

My favorite article was "Moving Upward In a Downturn" by Darrel Rigby and no, it's not because it was the first article and therefore the first to give an impression. I enjoyed Rigby's article because it was written in a language I (a mild-mannered history major) can understand. My Dad is a regional risk manager for a Fortune500 corporation and his business language just baffles the crap out of me so to have someone actually explain things to me in terms I can understand is very helpful. Explaining economics shouldn't require a PhD from Harvard; if I can explain post-modernism to mathematics major in his own terms, economy experts can explain business to me in terms I can understand.

The third essay, "After the layoffs, What Next," was understandable but I disagreed with much of it's premise in terms of micromanaging layoffs. This also goes into my personal belief of corporate policy versus individual store policy. Similar to federal versus state powers, there are many policies that the corporate office can come up with that just does not apply to on the local level. As a retail salesman of eight years, I can testify to this as our regional office has a bad knack of coming up with general ideas that DO NOT WORK. I believe in corporate over-arching policy that frames an outline, but does not micromanage the local branches given each situation and locale is unique and therefore requires a specific response to certain situations and/or rules.

I won't go into too much more detail about the essays versus my personal beliefs but I will state that there is much knowledge to gain from these essays, whether you agree with them or not. Discourse is always a good thing and intellectual discourse on economic policies as well as corporate strategies is something our market and government really need to engage in right now rather than do what they are doing.
Bev
The Harvard Business Review Paperback Series is designed to bring today's professionals the information they need to stay competitive in a fast-moving global market. This book is a collection of papers from academics and business professionals on various business strategies during an economic chaos. This book was published in 2003 which consists of eight chapters originally printed from 1998-2002. These papers discuss fixing the business fallouts prior to 2002. The economic picture you read in this book is nothing like what we experience now. The economic bubble created largely by booming real estate market and the collapse of mortgage industry resulting in domino effect that hastened the bankruptcy of many mortgage banks, investment firms, major commercial banks, the American auto industry, and airline companies. Government intervention on a massive scale that includes bailouts and takeovers with significant government regulation and bureaucracy is a rigorous application of Keynesian dynamics into the operation of free market. The economy is no longer localized but it is global and the ripple effect is very damaging.

The first chapter is an interesting chapter that analyzes the economic downturns and what the executives need to focus on. The author identifies three phases and illustrates with some examples (page 5). Solving the growth crisis during economic downturn is to identify hidden assets and using them a source to generate revenues (chapter 2); this is illustrated with examples on page 39-40. It is rather ironic that in this chapter, the authors discuss GM and Chrysler and positive impact their business decisions had with regard to identifying and using the hidden assets to increase revenue. Now we know that these to companies ended in bankruptcies because of their failure to remain competitive. Ford was not mentioned in this chapter but it remains strong with no government help. I think the editors could have excluded this chapter from the book as it stands out as odd in the present day circumstances. Sometimes layoffs and downsizing may not be the best solution to fight the economic crisis since your competitors are too eager to absorb your good mangers (Chapter 3). This point is further supported in chapter 6 where the author suggests that cutting capital budget, which increases cash flow rather than cutting costs by layoffs. Individual and organizational resilience (chapter 4), and quiet business leaders who work patiently (chapter 7) are important factors during turbulent times for a company. I found the last chapter on patching most interesting; this chapter shows how patch work as opposed to reorganization (mergers) of a company is useful in handling some tough times (summarized on page 157).

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Vivados
Great content pertinent to the current business market economy. Easy to follow interesting topics that provide insightful examples of how to manage as an executive during a turbulent time in history. The book does not claim to solve all the problems, however, the educated approach, as is the case with all Harvard Business, helps examine what can be done to offer today's leaders direction without destroying the framework of the current business structure. The short article format offers readers flexibility regarding various topics. The higher educational organization of the content is factual rather than just canned concepts. I know that I will be able to shelf the book and pick it up at a later time as a useful resource now and into the future.
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